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wheel polishing

Tim Storey

Well-known member
Joined
12 Nov 2006
Messages
1,233
Morning all, quiet here in work but i guess thats not a bad thing...

So, the car desparately needs a clean but the weather hasn't been dry enough to give it a proper going over and polish etc. So quick question for those in the know? Would you or do you polish black lacquered wheels? i've got the autoglym deep polish, super resin polish (Halfords 3 for 2 on all autoglym stuff) the whole lot in fact but was wondering whether it can be used on lacquered wheels or if anyone polishes their coloured or otherwise wheels?

cheers

Tim


Migration info. Legacy thread was 104502
 
be careful with the autoglym stuff especially near any trim as it will leave a white residue (chalk based).

I have waxed wheels before and it makes cleaning them much easier.


Migration info. Legacy thread was 104509
 
so i'm not being overly obsessive then? thats a minor relief....

Migration info. Legacy thread was 104510
 
No, not yet...

I keep wanting to take the wheels off the megane to clean them as you can't quite get behind the spokes, but then I came to my senses... she is the dirty girl after all! :wink:


Migration info. Legacy thread was 104512
 
yeah my golf is looking a little dirty, but its a diesel so they're meant to be dirty right?......besides, dirty hides a lot of things...... :wink:

Migration info. Legacy thread was 104516
 
I use Collinite 476 on my wheels - that's a good general use polish and very hard wearing (also use it on my pickup).

Migration info. Legacy thread was 104517
 
are they polished/alloy wheels? Looking at mine they're lacquered black 2-piece split rims and i figured with a bit of polish they might stay cleaner longer or be easier to clean....

And whats worse? I'm becoming obsessive about it. When we first got the car i was adamant that it would be driven first and cleaned second. The last couple of times i've cleaned and polished the car it was 8 pm, cold and dark, BUT dry hence the polishing..... I think i might be in love.... :D


Migration info. Legacy thread was 104519
 
Previous poster said:
Quote: Originally posted by nicola on 29 December 2006
she is the dirty girl after all! :wink:

just like her owner :wink:

Migration info. Legacy thread was 104525
 
Previous poster said:
Quote: Originally posted by Tim Storey on 29 December 2006

are they polished/alloy wheels? Looking at mine they're lacquered black 2-piece split rims and i figured with a bit of polish they might stay cleaner longer or be easier to clean....



I have the Carrera 5 spokes:

[u:VhrNZBsD9U]

As far as G told me the collinite is good protection on any alloy wheels.

Migration info. Legacy thread was 104536
 
Previous poster said:
Quote: Originally posted by Tim Storey on 29 December 2006

Morning all, quiet here in work but i guess thats not a bad thing...

So, the car desparately needs a clean but the weather hasn't been dry enough to give it a proper going over and polish etc. So quick question for those in the know? Would you or do you polish black lacquered wheels? i've got the autoglym deep polish, super resin polish (Halfords 3 for 2 on all autoglym stuff) the whole lot in fact but was wondering whether it can be used on lacquered wheels or if anyone polishes their coloured or otherwise wheels?

cheers

Tim



a question for Elite..

on that basis I've moved this post to spit & polish as it applies across the board

Migration info. Legacy thread was 104539
 
So Poo, whats the collinite? Is it solely for wheel or all over?

(Mentally calculating taking one wheel off at a time and using 3 coats of collinite with 24 hourse between each coat.... :? )


Migration info. Legacy thread was 104553
 
Previous poster said:
Quote: Originally posted by Tim Storey on 29 December 2006

So Poo, whats the collinite? Is it solely for wheel or all over?

(Mentally calculating taking one wheel off at a time and using 3 coats of collinite with 24 hourse between each coat.... :? )
It's a wax. I don't put it on the bodywork of the Porsche, but you could. I do use it on the bodywork of the pickup, because it lasts a very long time and gives a harder coat than zymol - so better protection for driving accross fields. But IMO it doesn't give the finish that zymol does. This winter I have used in on the front and rear bumpers though.

I think it was about £15 for a good sized tub. It is very useful stuff. Elite (G) advised me to use it in the first place.




Migration info. Legacy thread was 104559
 
hmmm bumpers sounds prmoising. I used the autoglym bumper care stuff and its horrible. Gives a really greasy feeling touch to them and takes forever to polish up.... think i'll try and get hold of some of that collinite stuff

Migration info. Legacy thread was 104572
 
Wheel surface Cleaning:
[/b:jmPwSlCRf3]

Clean, properly conditioned wheels, tyres and fender wells greatly enhance the overall appearance of your
vehicle. Today's wheels come in a variety of materials and finishes. Clean one wheel at a time, wash wheels
and wheel-wells before the rest of the vehicle to avoid dirt and etc. coming into contact to newly washed surfaces.




It is important to keep wheel surfaces clean, as well as improving the overall look of the vehicle leaving them dirty can have many adverse effects; the black powder coating on the surface of your wheel has four components; a static friction charge (caused by the pads contact with the rotors) that attracts dirt, road tar and other contaminants kicked up by both your vehicle and others. Friction heats the pads and callipers to extremely high temperatures, and causes tiny particles of hot metal to wear off and sent flying in different directions.






Many of these hot metal particles land on your rim and literally fuse themselves to the surface. Finally there is brake pad adhesive,
modern brake pads are complex compounds of metals, synthetic materials and adhesives (the binder system) which is designed to wear away under friction like the rest of the pad. The adhesives used in brake pads can be very difficult to remove and they are also corrosive
and will etch the wheel surface, the metal particles from the pads and rotors will become a conduit for rust compromising the paint surface of your wheel.



Road dirt / Tar should be removed with a solvent type cleaner (Stoner’s Tarminator ) and any bonded contaminants or over spray removed with
Detailer's Clay, then clean surface with a chemical cleaner / polish
wash and dry wheel surface thoroughly.
Once the brake dust has been removed with a 100% acid-free wheel cleaner apply a citrus based cleaner to the surface, agitate with a boar’s hair wheel brush and rinse off, dry thoroughly and then apply a polymer sealant for protection, this will also make future cleaning easier. A polymer is recommended

as it has a higher melting temperature (350oF) compared to Carnauba wax (180oF) a wheel surface will reach a temperature in excess of 120oF due to rotor friction and in excess of 195oF when parked in the sun.
Stubborn brake dust- Power Wheel Cleaner
even though it does not contain harsh acids, it dissolves the adhesive that is mixed with the brake dust. (This is why brake dust is so difficult to remove.) Just spray on wheels and tires, agitate with brush if needed, and hose-off. Don't worry if you accidentally spray your vehicle's body, it will not harm the paint.
Periodically remove the wheels (one at a time) to enable the back of the wheel,
callipers
and give better access to the wheel wells. Should the wheel surface have small scratches they can he removed with a mildly abrasive polish. The inner rims are usually unfinished
aluminium
, remove any road tar with isopropyl alcohol (IPA) or a solvent cleaner
(Stoner™ Tarminator)
and then use detailer’s clay to remove any surface / imbedded contaminates. Dependant upon there condition clean with P21S Total Auto Wash and then sprayWheel Cleaner (Regular or Gel)
allow to dwell for five to ten minutes (5-10) and then use a stream of clean water to remove residue.
If this doesn’t remove the imbedded brake dust (sequestered brake dust will etch aluminium over time) the surface will need to be levelled using fine grade (2000/2500/3000) Nikken finishing papers and a block.
Apply a protective product, a polymer is recommended
as it has a higher melting temperature (350oF+) compared to Carnauba wax (185oF+/- ) as a wheel surface will reach a temperature in excess of 120oF due to rotor friction and in excess of 195oF when parked in the sun.
[/list:jmPwSlCRf3]

[/i:jmPwSlCRf3]


Caution-

avoid metal polishing products that contain anhydrous ammonia, solvents or acids, or zinc, which is often present in
aluminium
in large quantities, as it can be dissolved very easily by ammonia, the related anhydrous chemicals and acids. Avoid wheel cleaners that contain Hydrofluoric acid, Oxalic, or strong mixes of Sulfuric / Phosphoric acids.




Migration info. Legacy thread was 104591
 

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