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Track day tyres

Russell Hird

Well-known member
Joined
11 Dec 2005
Messages
51
I am going to need new tyres soon, do any track day lovers have any tips as to the stickyist and gripiest road legal tyres on the market.


Migration info. Legacy thread was 89558
 
also booked for 8 th December to trash the new boots


Migration info. Legacy thread was 89559
 
Toyo R888 or something like that, try giving JZ a call, see you on the 8th

Migration info. Legacy thread was 89568
 
Trackday in December! I'd make sure I had the best wet weather road tyre you can afford.

Migration info. Legacy thread was 90016
 
Wet weather track/road tyres: Pirelli Corsa Systems, imho, are very good.

For fast road/wet weather track... also try Michelin PS2s... actually good enough in wet conditions and proper race circuits (NOT Bedford).

Dry conditions: Toyo R888s (great VFM), but I'm also going to be trying out some Yoko A048Rs next on recommendation...

Can't beat R-compound tyres for dry grip though... (Corsa/R888/MPSCs etc)

Migration info. Legacy thread was 90051
 
OC, why is PS2 no good for Bedford?

Migration info. Legacy thread was 90053
 
Bedford is a point'n'squirt circuit: it's very throttle, brake, throttle, brake... whereas a real race circuit (Brands, Donny, Silver, Goodwood, etc) are flowing and demand less of a tyre in terms of sticky grip. PS2s are no where near as sticky as R-compound tyres, but it has quite good lateral limits which suit the flowing nature of proper race circuits better.

Another tell-tale sign of Bedford compared to other race circuits is that the roll-bar settings for Bedford are completely different compared to race circuits in order to get the best out of the car. Bedford requires much softer settings to allow the car to squat/compress/roll through the tight 2nd gear corners in order to find grip/get the power down under load. Race circuits, however, allow you to crank the rollbars up to full stiff to keep body motion in check and let the lateral grip of the tyres do the work without losing speed (momentum driving).

Migration info. Legacy thread was 90074
 
That's very interesting about Bedford. Where does the Ring fit in?

Migration info. Legacy thread was 90093
 
Ring = a very bumpy race circuit! :twisted:

like all of Englands twistiest and finest A and B-roads strung together with no junctions or traffic! I can but imagine... :sigh:

Migration info. Legacy thread was 90099
 
If I understand it correctly, a race circuit needs hard suspension, but on the bumpy B-road (ie the Ring) you need soft suspension to stay on the road. So what would you use on the ring?

Migration info. Legacy thread was 90111
 
so that's my excuse for driving too slowly at Bedford the next time, wonder if I keep the anti-roll bar cranked up to max at bedford, I can prastice my drifting technique ! :D

Migration info. Legacy thread was 90112
 
Previous poster said:
Quote: Originally posted by Butzi on 14 November 2006

If I understand it correctly, a race circuit needs hard suspension, but on the bumpy B-road (ie the Ring) you need soft suspension to stay on the road. So what would you use on the ring?

Ah, that's why everyone loves the 'Ring!

But it's not quite that simple... The main objective is to maintain as permanent a contact patch between tyre and asphalt. Hard suspension on a smooth circuit reduces the opportunities for vertical shocks to lift the tyre off the surface. A bumpy circuit requires more compliant suspension to maintain contact between tyre and surface.

Stiffer rollbars can be used which also reduces the amount of rotational inertia (twist between left/right suspension points) that would otherwise try to lift the inner radii side of a car off the ground. The degree of stiffness affects the amount of rotational inertia (lateral pitch) that a car can exert on the opposite side to lift the wheel (so if the car pitches left, the force is to lift the right/inner wheel). What needs to be remembered is that rotational inertia exerts itself in a centripetal manner - outwards from the centre - or inwards towards the wheel being lifted. As we may remember from A-level physics, centripetal acceleration is roughly a function of mass, speed and radius.

Tight (slow) corners require softer rollbars that allow the tyres lateral frictional coefficient to increase under acceleration - or where there is more lateral twist to maintain the inside wheel in contact with the surface. More gradual (faster) corners require stiffer rollbars to minimise the amount of rotational inertia - thereby minimising the twist to keep both tyres in contact with the road surface.

Or to keep it simple, in general, softer rollbars on tight circuits allow the chassis slightly more roll allowing the tyres to "dig in"/work harder on the road surface through corners. Harder rollbars on tight circuits have the opposite effect.

So on the Ring, you want softer vertical suspension to maintain vertical (gravitational) contact between tyre and road, but stiffer rollbars because most of it is high speed open corners.

In contrast, at Bedford, you want firm vertical suspension because there are no bumps to deal with, but softer rollbars because many of the corners are slow/tight corners.

Phew! :anorak off:! :oops:
sheesh, you scientific types... :wink:

Migration info. Legacy thread was 90135
 
Great info there Ade, thanks. Hadn't occurred to me to consider the roll bar and vertical suspension separately!

Ever consider adding to the FAQ section on suspension set up? ie track vs road set up regarding camber, toe etc and the effect, (I remmember you wrote something on it in another post), and the effect of adjusting various componants of the chassis and the road condition for each setting?


Migration info. Legacy thread was 90151
 
Ade, 100% agree with Mick, that needs to go in a FAQ section it is a great summary.

Migration info. Legacy thread was 90153
 

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