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Straight to the point 996 buying advice needed

chriswt

Active member
Joined
1 Apr 2013
Messages
27
I'm looking at getting a no thrills 996 having seen how much car you can get for the money.

I'm certainly not put off by all the anti-water cooled nonsense or the engine failure stories although they do need a bit of consideration hence my post.

I've read up quite a bit now but can't find a simple summary of what 996 to buy:

1. Do you buy any car you like provided that its been given the all clear mechanically by a Porsche specialist know that engine failure is low risk?

2. Do you only ever buy cars that have had an engine rebuild?

3. Further to that they should they only be engine rebuilds that include modifications to prevent further failure rather than just a replacement engine?


I'm looking to spend anywhere between £10k-£15k for a weekend car which I want to ultimately keep for a long long time.

Currently I'm of the mind set that I should spend under £10k for a leggy but well looked after bog standard 996 and then be ready to spend £5-6k on an engine rebuild in the future.

Thanks
 
Number 1, but make sure they inspect the bores. Then fit a low temperature thermostat.

MC
 
MisterCorn said:
Number 1, but make sure they inspect the bores. Then fit a low temperature thermostat.

MC

thanks

I've not looked into inspection options yet but would make sure they come recommended by you forum guys.
 
If you buy a cheaper good long legger get it onto a maintenance plan like Hartechs then if the worst does happen they'll fix it, if it doesn't its there for mods etc...

Dave
 
My view (and only my view)

Buy a leggy 3.4 on the basis that:
1, they're cheap
2.they suffer far less on the bore scoring front as they get older than 3.6s
3.IMS issues seem to affect lower mileage cars, if they have made it to 80k they seem to be ok
4. They are a sweeter engine than the 3.6, more revvy but slightly less torque

Suggest you treat the purchase a bit like an endowment mortgage, low up front investment but there is a possibility you'll have to pay more to settle the mortgage in a few years if the stock market goes foobar.

Be careful of cars with "new" engines there are some shocking practices around in rebuilding or salvaging engines which are invisible externally, I'd only buy one that has been rebuilt/ replaced by a very reliable source such as Hartech etc, otherwise you'd be better buying one with a shot engine (if you can find one) and getting it replaced yourself

Other opinions are available :D
 
I would only buy a 996, that has a original Porsche replacement engine from 07 forward...
That's what I did, so I don't worry about it...(But failure can still happen.)
If you are looking anyway, why not look for one with a new Porsche replacement engine? :?

Regards
Stefan
 
I'd buy a good long legs small price, and keep the money aside for what ifs coz they may not come and a lower mile dearer car may still have issues, all a gamble but I've had many a long legger that puts a smile on my face! :thumb:
Seriously consider maintenance plan and just enjoy a car that won't depreciate much if you look after it, it didnt cost alot and it is a 911 :wink:

Dave
 
Stefandk said:
I would only buy a 996, that has a original Porsche replacement engine from 07 forward...
That's what I did, so I don't worry about it...(But failure can still happen.)
If you are looking anyway, why not look for one with a new Porsche replacement engine? :?

Regards
Stefan

Why from 2007 onwards?

I assumed that if the engine was replaced with the same unit it could still go pop which is why the Hartech/Autofarm engines appealed more.
 
smigga said:
I'd buy a good long legs small price, and keep the money aside for what ifs coz they may not come and a lower mile dearer car may still have issues, all a gamble but I've had many a long legger that puts a smile on my face! :thumb:
Seriously consider maintenance plan and just enjoy a car that won't depreciate much if you look after it, it didnt cost alot and it is a 911 :wink:

Dave

Thanks for some sound advice.

I'm from Dan Saff rather than Op Norf so the Hartech maintenance plan would mean lots of long journeys to get anything fixed.
 
chriswt said:
Stefandk said:
I would only buy a 996, that has a original Porsche replacement engine from 07 forward...
That's what I did, so I don't worry about it...(But failure can still happen.)
If you are looking anyway, why not look for one with a new Porsche replacement engine? :?

Regards
Stefan

Why from 2007 onwards?

I assumed that if the engine was replaced with the same unit it could still go pop which is why the Hartech/Autofarm engines appealed more.

Correct me if I am wrong, but I think the IMS was updated in 2007 with a larger one, and also the newest RMS :bye:

Regards
Stefan
 
spectraluk said:
Stefandk said:
If you are looking anyway, why not look for one with a new Porsche replacement engine? :?

+1

If I was looking for a 996, I would surely buy yours :thumb: :thumb:

Regards
Stefan
 
Buy a leggy cheap one :thumb: Rationale is the engine has lasted without issues so 'may' be OK. If something drastic does happen you are best selling the car for parts/scrap and buying another as any rebuild costs is likely to take you over 50% of what you paid in the first place.

This is a 'risk management' method and actually against your objective of keeping it for a long time (somewhat subjective if you haven't had one before). In which case you need to buy at the top of your budget and the best you can afford.
 
I chose option 2 from your list: I spent under your budget on a car from a Porsche independent specialist who has serviced the car for the last year, with a full service history - by that I mean receipts for everything, not just stamps in a book - that had had a full rebuild 2 years ago at Hartech with all the improvement and strengthening work I could ever want.
 
Zingari said:
Buy a leggy cheap one :thumb: Rationale is the engine has lasted without issues so 'may' be OK. If something drastic does happen you are best selling the car for parts/scrap and buying another as any rebuild costs is likely to take you over 50% of what you paid in the first place.

This is a 'risk management' method and actually against your objective of keeping it for a long time (somewhat subjective if you haven't had one before). In which case you need to buy at the top of your budget and the best you can afford.

I know the 'risk management' method sort of flies in the face of the 'keeper' objective but surely there are cars out there with a good solid history and great condition which although might only cost £10k still be worth investing in long term? - I might be kidding myself. :?

I'm not so worried about spending 50% of the value of the car on an engine rebuild as I guess the cars value is 'subjective' and there are plenty of people who happily lose 50% of their car's value in depreciation and not worry in the slightest. Its all about the 'man maths'!!! :)
 

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