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Seriously... who has winter tyres for winter?

Do you fit winter tyres?

  • Yes

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0

tikkathree

Montreal
Joined
18 Aug 2013
Messages
539
Okay, I'm reading about winter tyres to keep away satan and prevent erectile dysfunction, prevent HGF in MGFs, etc.

I might be asking the wrong question in the wrong place but asking isn't going to cost me money so here goes...

Hands up please in favour of winter tyres.

Keep your hands up if you live south of the Tees-Exe line in the UK. (Those of you with a penchant for O level Geography will appreciate the reference.)

Keep your hands up if you actually drive your 911 right round the calendar.

I posted to a different thread earlier this evening which suggested there to be about 60 of us here so I'm hoping to extrapolate some kind of worthwhile statistic.

Thanks guys.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/motoring/motoringvideo/9715518/Winter-tyres-put-to-the-test.html


 
Hand up: I live down south but on a hill that doesn't get gritted so without winter tyres I'm left stranded at either the top or bottom of the hill at the first sign of snow - the grip in the snow is impressive but I have to be very cautious in the wet.

Hand up: I use my car all year round and this year the long range forecast indicates, apart from the mornings, the temperatures will seldom drop below 6C or 7C this winter so not sure if I'll bother changing over.
 
I use mine all year round and live in the centre of England (unless the decide to move it).

I have put winter tyres on for the last two years, and will again this year (as I have them) For 90% of the time I am at a disadvantage if I wanted to drive very fast, 5% of the time it's about the same, and 5% They are really good.

However that 5% is an important 5%, as its when conditions are at their worst.

The weather is generally mild round here. If I didn't already have them, (they are less than half worn now), I wouldn't be buying them.
 
I will put winter tyres on my 335d this winter. I need to get out and about in all weathers and i live in rural east northants with lots of windong country roads that quickly get covered in snow.

As ever, going is important, being able to turn is recommended, and stopping is critical. With winters i can do all three.
 
have them on the Z4 for a couple of years now ever since the GF got caught in the first snow of the year and couldn't get the thing moved out of the car park.

haven't decided how much i'll be driving the 964 during the winter, but it'll be winter tyres if i do

Michael
 
Live in the south and my 911 is for all year round, but if it gets really bad I can steal the missus 4x4 jeep. :D

Never fitted winter tyres either.
 
Just bought my first set yesterday, and I live in a rural location in Northampton and we have had some harsh winters as of late. My car gets used daily, though I will not fit them for a while yet as it is so mild.

After lots of research I established that is not good practice to keep swapping tyres on the rims (though many do) so I bought the rims as well.

Cost is a major factor so I got a good set second hand at what I considered to be a fair price, and if they are not as good as I hoped (or if I change the car) then at least I should be able to sell them on again without too much of a loss.

What put it into perspective for me is the following:
1. If I do not turn up for work and they do not class it as a "snow day" (which they never have, even though I could work from home) then they will take a days leave of me;
2. Even if I had a minor bump that could have been avoided with more suitable tyres, how much would that cost to fix?; and
3. I transport my daughter in the car and she is priceless.

Ashley
 
athomp04 said:
What put it into perspective for me is the following:
1. If I do not turn up for work and they do not class it as a "snow day" (which they never have, even though I could work from home) then they will take a days leave of me;
2. Even if I had a minor bump that could have been avoided with more suitable tyres, how much would that cost to fix?; and
3. I transport my daughter in the car and she is priceless.

Ashley

+1 :thumb:
 
I had a set for my previous car, I have a set for the wifes MX5.

I don't have any for the Porsche yet, due to me being ***** and wanting to get the correct 10j rims for the rears. I know I could use standard 11j and have a small but acceptable difference in the rolling radius between fronts and rears, but I don't want to.

The 10j's for Turbo or C4s are rare as the proverbial.

So although being an all year round daily driver, if necessary I'll leave it at home and take the wifes MX5 with winters on. Added bonus, it has 14" wheels and a full set of Goodyear Ultragrips cost me just £200 fitted two years ago :)
 
Got to spend a load of cash on the house soon, so am thinking I might get a set of winters for the old banger (Puma) and use the 911 on the warmer days :?:
 
If we had a winter that was more than three snowy days a year then I'd bother, but by winter we actually mean a day when snow makes the front page, some buried sheep and a three month period where there might be a nasty frost. I don't put winter tyres on our daily cars, and when I mentioned this thread at work nobody else does, in fact apart from one guy nobody knew why you would even do that in this country.

Bizarre.
:)
 
It is not about how much snow there is, winter tyres offer far better grip, especially when stopping, when temperatures drop below 7C.

Winter Tyre Myth 1: 'The temperature can get quite low, but it only snows occasionally where I live. My normal tyres are fine."

Incorrect - Although other 'non-winter' tyres can work well in mild winter conditions, the winter variety continue to work at an optimum level below the 7°C. This is the case for all conditions – wet, dry, snow/ice/slush, etc. Thanks to the special rubber compound that a winter tyre is made up of, it does not harden in cold conditions. This means that the tread flexibility remains supple and continues gripping just as well as before.

Winter Tyre Myth 2: 'The distance it takes to brake is no different compared to the tyres I already have on my car."

Incorrect – When compared with the stopping distance of a summer or all-season tyre, the braking distance of a winter tyre (dependent of the on speed of the car and the condition of the road) is up to 10% shorter. To put that into context, that's around two vehicle lengths. So the use of winter tyres in winter can be the difference between crashing or not.

http://www.blackcircles.com/tyres/winter-tyres/winter-tyre-myths
 
Why wouldn't you fit winter tyres (assuming the average temperature is below 7C)?

The only downside is the initial outlay. After that it's win, win in my opinion. Your summer tyres will last that much longer so overall your running costs won't change, your stopping distance and grip is improved reducing the risk of an accident (and making a claim on your Insurance) and you less likely to get stuck if it does snow.

The wheels themselves can always be sold at later date for similar money and since people are always exchanging their cars you can often find a set of used wheels already fitted with winter tyres at a reasonable price.

When stopping remember to keep an eye on the person behind because they might not have winter tyres so could go into the back of you.
 
snow plough

Snow tyres are needed to push the plough (optional extra).
 

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