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People without PPF on their 911s

Tiger911

Monza
Joined
5 Feb 2009
Messages
160
How has your 911 held up? Please share the year and mileage you have done and the condition of your front end and rear arches?

I am contemplating not PPF'ing my GTS, just wondering how bad things could get if I don't...Its on 12K miles and no noticible chips yet.

Do you regret not getting PPF?
 
2015, 19k miles, (11k in my ownership)
Condition of the bonnet is not too bad at all, one or two blemishes here and there, arches not bad either.
My GTS is in Carrara so it's far more forgiving than the darker colours.

Driving style can minimise some of the detritus that occurs. It's sounds obvious but keeping a reasonable distance, if able, from the car in front makes a difference. When on tour, in a group for example, that's when I've experienced the most stone chip damage.
 
My 991.1 C4S had 56k miles when I bought it and yes it had it's fair share of small stone chips to the front bonnet and bumper. Not enough to put me off buying it and some Chipex work hid most of it (but you'll never make them disappear without a paint job - well I can't anyway). They only really show under bright garage lighting.

On the rear wheel arches the existing protection is a bit blasted but not to the extent it has caused any damage to the paintwork - it's just that you can't polish it or get rid of the appearance without replacing the film (which I think is thicker than PPF?). Interestingly there are zero chips on the area outside the protection film of the rear arches and mine is a wide body as is yours.

I did have a chip on the passenger door which had been poorly repaired and bubbled with corroded Al which was more of a concern, about half the size of a little finger nail which had to be rubbed right back and painted but still shows.

If I bought a car like yours with PPF I don't think I could resist taking it all off to be able to polish the paintwork :grin:

I have no clue about PPF but it seems pretty pricey, so I guess you have to weigh the cost against an eventual respray at the front which seems to be the accepted norm.
 
If you do a lot of motorway driving/ track days PPF might be worth having a thought.
I am personally not a fan of it.
 
rear arches are worse than the front end on my car for some reason.
If your one to worry about paint appearance the answer is PPF
 
My new Spyder is at Topaz right now having PPF applied to the entire car. I also have it installed on the front of my 911. Well worth it I think (as long as you get it done properly).

My 911 was done in 2017 and years later it's perfect, not "Ok, not too many stone chips", perfect, no blemishes whatsoever (and no swirl marks)

Obvious reasons
- Protects the paintwork from stone chips.

But also
- Protects the paint from bad washing jobs, and swirl marks.
- Easy to wash once applied, removing flies splattered on the front becomes as
simple as just wiping with your wet sponge
- Gives a deeper shine to darker coloured cars
 
Personally I'm not a fan especially the cost of the stuff. If you only plan keeping a new car with PPF a few years you'll pass the problem onto the new owner when it starts to age.. But at least they won't have paid for it :grin:

I've yet to know of someone who buys a new car gets it PPF'd and keeps it 5yrs.

I believe there's some stuff that's "Self-Healing". What a load of pony :floor:
 
Zingari said:
Personally I'm not a fan especially the cost of the stuff. If you only plan keeping a new car with PPF a few years you'll pass the problem onto the new owner when it starts to age.. But at least they won't have paid for it :grin:

I've yet to know of someone who buys a new car gets it PPF'd and keeps it 5yrs.

I believe there's some stuff that's "Self-Healing". What a load of pony :floor:

I put PPF on my 911 and I've kept it five years. Not sure what five years has to do with it? Point is you're protecting the paint whilst you own it.

Self healing is legit. Stone chips appear in the film but when you wash it with hot water the marks disappear.
 
I've got 5-6 years of stone chips on the front bumper and bonnet, one 1cm bicycle scratch on the front wing, and some odd feral cat urine damage on the front bumper. It might give a purist some palpitations, but the car gets used. It's held up pretty well in my view.

No doubt one day it'll need repainting, but I can live with that.
 
MaxA said:
I've got 5-6 years of stone chips on the front bumper and bonnet, one 1cm bicycle scratch on the front wing, and some odd feral cat urine damage on the front bumper. It might give a purist some palpitations, but the car gets used. It's held up pretty well in my view.

No doubt one day it'll need repainting, but I can live with that.

So you see that as a badge of honour? Not an issue with that if you do.

Obviously people are free to do whatever they want. But it's funny the way some look at it. I'd argue that someone (like me) intends to drive my new car a lot and that's the reason for the PPF. If I was going to lock it away and admire it I wouldn't need the protection.

But having it on, I can drive it (hard) and have the car still look pristine after I wash it.

Like I said, whatever floats your boat but apart from the price there's no downside.
 
It's not so much a badge of honour, but it's the reality of driving a car in the desert, in the snow, on gravel, at the track. A car that has to share the garage with the kids bikes [they still remember I got a bit angry].

I did get the car de-dinged, paint corrected and ceramic coated after I bought it, and it is still super easy to keep clean but we are where we are. On reflection a PPF would have made a lot of sense; maybe I should get the PPF done after it's painted. Whenever that is.

In the meantime I can live with the odd stone chip, and like Magnus Walker says, 'dirt don't slow you down'.
 
I've heard a coupe of stories recently regarding old PPF looking tired, owners getting it removed and half the car paint coming off with it. Saw a photo and it looked quite serious. I'm sure there is a point of view that well fitted and good quality PPF will not do this and accepting that logic, how would anyone know what is going to be good quality and well fitted? Is there some sort of standard to look out for? Equally, I suspect that garaging or not the car with all the effects of heat and UV if left in the sun could be another factor that can vary peoples experiences. :?:
 
masher964 said:
I've heard a coupe of stories recently regarding old PPF looking tired, owners getting it removed and half the car paint coming off with it. Saw a photo and it looked quite serious. I'm sure there is a point of view that well fitted and good quality PPF will not do this and accepting that logic, how would anyone know what is going to be good quality and well fitted? Is there some sort of standard to look out for? Equally, I suspect that garaging or not the car with all the effects of heat and UV if left in the sun could be another factor that can vary peoples experiences. :?:

Some PPF experts do mention that it's not highly recommended on cars that had re spray.
 
masher964 said:
I've heard a coupe of stories recently regarding old PPF looking tired, owners getting it removed and half the car paint coming off with it. Saw a photo and it looked quite serious. I'm sure there is a point of view that well fitted and good quality PPF will not do this and accepting that logic, how would anyone know what is going to be good quality and well fitted? Is there some sort of standard to look out for? Equally, I suspect that garaging or not the car with all the effects of heat and UV if left in the sun could be another factor that can vary peoples experiences. :?:

This happens if the PPF is applied too early after the car is painted (or poor material is used). I'd imagine that a car that had a respray, it would depend on the quality of the respray.

This is why I sent me new car to Topaz in London as they are considered to be the best.The work is guaranteed for 5 years.
 
isysman said:
masher964 said:
I've heard a coupe of stories recently regarding old PPF looking tired, owners getting it removed and half the car paint coming off with it. Saw a photo and it looked quite serious. I'm sure there is a point of view that well fitted and good quality PPF will not do this and accepting that logic, how would anyone know what is going to be good quality and well fitted? Is there some sort of standard to look out for? Equally, I suspect that garaging or not the car with all the effects of heat and UV if left in the sun could be another factor that can vary peoples experiences. :?:

This happens if the PPF is applied too early after the car is painted (or poor material is used). I'd imagine that a car that had a respray, it would depend on the quality of the respray.

This is why I sent me new car to Topaz in London as they are considered to be the best.The work is guaranteed for 5 years.

so what is the cost to do the whole car ? which I think was the point zingers was making if like most people keep there new cars 2-3 years then move it on or relative to covering a low mileage v cost.
 

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