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PCCB replacement pads - HELP/ADVICE

mikecrossuk

New member
Joined
8 Sep 2010
Messages
33
Hi All,

I'm looking for some assistance regarding replacement brake pads for ceramic rotors.

Last month I got a puncture on the passenger front side and as the two rear tyres were an advisory on the last MOT decided to upgrade all 4 corners with Michelin Pilot Sport 4S's.

Whilst the car was in the garage I'd asked for them to check the Brake Pad wear level and ever since there's been what I describe as a knocking noise coming from the front passenger side. I took it back to the garage who've advised that the car has Pagid pads in and the pad is moving up and down in the caliper ever so slightly causing the knocking noise.

My concern is I've owned the car 2 1/2 years and apart from the odd squeak with them being PCCB's the pads have never made a knocking noise so why would they now and its only the passenger side.

Has anyone any experience with Pagid pads being slightly smaller than OEM pads? Does this slight movement up and down sound plausible?

I believe the pads are approximately 50% worn and from advice from other PCCB owners on posts they recommend changing them at 50% to preserve the rotors, which I'm more than happy to do but i'm slightly dubious that changing the pads will resolve the issue.

What brands do people recommend as from what I'm reading Pagid get a decent rep.

Also can anyone send some links to the correct pads for a 2009 997.2 with PCCB's as It seems to be a minefield.

Many Thanks in advance and Merry Christmas

Mike
 
You have had 4 tyres replaced and the pads inspected for wear ..

To inspect pads you visually look at them .. perhaps a mirror to see the inner pad with the wheel on .. there is no physical removal of anything for this operation so i'm struggling with an inspection of the pads causing anything .

The pads are held in place by backing plates .. these are items that lock into the caliper pistons and have a sticky back that binds to the pads .. these stop rotation and also the dreaded squeaking you get with PCCB,s .

To test pad rotation ( knocking from pads ) drive the car slowly in reverse and lightly touch the brakes .. you will hear a clunk .. do the same forwards and the same again .. do it as much as you like but this is the best i can tell you without removing the pads and inspecting them as to check these .

Non porsche pads can do this noise if the backing plates have come unstuck on all models ... i'm unsure on porsche pads but i don't remember these doing this ... on porsche pads it does cause a squeak when slowly stopping .

So a test for pads but if not that what are we left with ..

Do you have center locks ? they have to be done up in a certain procedure and to a certain amount of torque ... could they be loose perhaps ..

Flat tyre .. suspension issues perhaps ..

For me a road test so i can hear the noise .. if an unfamiliar one to me then something called a chassis ear is used .. it's basically microphones attached to different places on the suspension to try and track down which component is causing the noise .

Not the cheapest of jobs as it takes 2 people to drive the car and listen whilst switching through the different sensors and a repositioning of the sensors is often needed and more driving ... time consuming basically .

I can't comment on replacing half worn pads though as it's not something anyone has ever told me or explained to me the reason .
 
Hi DeMort,

Thanks for the response.

At first I thought suspension due to the flat tyre, i.e. Top Mounts etc however the garage are 100% its the pads moving or "rotating"

I'll carry out the test Tomorrow and will report back my findings.

It sounds like potentially the backing plate has become unstuck.

They are not centre lock wheels and from what I can find online I think the justification to change the pads at 50% is to prevent excess wear on the ceramic rotors.
 
As a fellow PCCB owner I can confirm the original OEM pads are Pagid, though in a Porsche box, the only shame is the reference number on the back of the pad does not align to anything Pagid sell. I ended buying new pads direct from Porsche which work out about around £440 for a set. Though, as a person that has bought new front PCCB's the pads are inexpensive compared to front discs. All I will say it required a good chat to my other half to gain agreement for a second set, amazing discs and would spec a car with them again. Just make sure you let them cool when you come to a stop after a hard outing, circa < 200 degC. My first set had heavy blisters where the heat had remained by being covered by the callipers and retaining the heat.

One of those life lessons, you only do once.
 
Hi Chris,

Thanks for the response.

I've just had a price through from Porsche and found that as you say they are Pagid pads they provide and the garage said the Pagid part number installed doesn't match anything from Pagid so that ties up with what your saying too.

I'll look back into it after new year and hopefully get it resolved.

:thumb:
 
To be honest i think i have changed pads on a PCCB car twice in my career .. they just don't really seem to wear out !

I have changed discs though from damage due to a garage not removing the wheels correctly .. ie not using the tools to noises .. rattling on Turbos and various issues .

As such if owners say it helps the longevity of the discs then that's fine , i would just report they are at 50 % worn to be honest .

Squeaking noise to me is going to be backing plates unstuck .. done a few of these over the years .

That's pretty much all i know about these !!
 
I think your answer could be in Demorts post above... The PCCB discs are very easy to damage if things are not done correctly and with great care. I would get the disk checked as a first port of call, by a trusted different garage.
Pagid are OEM supplier, the pads will not be the issue unless its something has not been refitted correctly. I have fitted Pagid pads on my car (non pccb) and they are perfect and I fitted a set on a friends pccb car and they are also perfect.
 
darkhorse said:
I think your answer could be in Demorts post above... The PCCB discs are very easy to damage if things are not done correctly and with great care. I would get the disk checked as a first port of call, by a trusted different garage.
Pagid are OEM supplier, the pads will not be the issue unless its something has not been refitted correctly. I have fitted Pagid pads on my car (non pccb) and they are perfect and I fitted a set on a friends pccb car and they are also perfect.

Apologies for the late response it's been a busy Christmas and New Year.

I'll get it booked into a garage. I'm aware the Ceramic rotors are very brittle and susceptible to chips/cracks if wheels aren't installed or removed correctly but this is fairly evident to eye and from what I can see there are no issues with them. Are there any other tests or things to look out on PCCB's apart from the above?

Mike
 
mikecrossuk said:
darkhorse said:
I think your answer could be in Demorts post above... The PCCB discs are very easy to damage if things are not done correctly and with great care. I would get the disk checked as a first port of call, by a trusted different garage.
Pagid are OEM supplier, the pads will not be the issue unless its something has not been refitted correctly. I have fitted Pagid pads on my car (non pccb) and they are perfect and I fitted a set on a friends pccb car and they are also perfect.

Apologies for the late response it's been a busy Christmas and New Year.

I'll get it booked into a garage. I'm aware the Ceramic rotors are very brittle and susceptible to chips/cracks if wheels aren't installed or removed correctly but this is fairly evident to eye and from what I can see there are no issues with them. Are there any other tests or things to look out on PCCB's apart from the above?

Mike

Hi Mike, is there any evidence of the 'wear markers' showing on the discs? If so this will be really obvious, from past experience it doesnt really matter if there is, but if there isnt then they will likely see you out!
 
Chips , wear or damage to a brake disc won't cause a knocking noise ...

991 turbo had an issue with the discs from new that did , but that was a design fault and a stop sale fault .. that won't be your issue .

If the knocking noise is constant with brake depress then something is moving .. hence i wondered about loose wheel .. suspension damage etc ... might be the top strut mount .. damage is hard to assess on here :)

Pads unstuck and that's a squeal on stopping .. not a knocking noise .
 
spongebob squarepants said:
mikecrossuk said:
darkhorse said:
I think your answer could be in Demorts post above... The PCCB discs are very easy to damage if things are not done correctly and with great care. I would get the disk checked as a first port of call, by a trusted different garage.
Pagid are OEM supplier, the pads will not be the issue unless its something has not been refitted correctly. I have fitted Pagid pads on my car (non pccb) and they are perfect and I fitted a set on a friends pccb car and they are also perfect.

Apologies for the late response it's been a busy Christmas and New Year.

I'll get it booked into a garage. I'm aware the Ceramic rotors are very brittle and susceptible to chips/cracks if wheels aren't installed or removed correctly but this is fairly evident to eye and from what I can see there are no issues with them. Are there any other tests or things to look out on PCCB's apart from the above?

Mike

Hi Mike, is there any evidence of the 'wear markers' showing on the discs? If so this will be really obvious, from past experience it doesnt really matter if there is, but if there isnt then they will likely see you out!

From memory I think I can see a wear marker on one of the fronts and one of the backs so that got me too looking at more info.

These markers are apparent on "some" brand new cars and they're designed to be sacrificial so that they break down when the discs need changing

I've checked the wear and from memory they're worn 0.2mm from new using digital Vernier's and the indicator is smooth to touch.

The cars on 51,000 miles which would sit correct with the current wear assuming the cars not been tracked prior to my ownership.

Top struts seem to be the most logical to me. As DeMort eluded too I need to get it to a proper garage to fully assess.
 

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