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First Porsche/car purchase advice - 997.2

dng

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Joined
5 Mar 2022
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Looking at a 997.2 but have a few questions as a new buyer to cars/porsche. Ideally an S, coupe, black, other then that pretty flexible on any other specs

Pricing = I have budgeted up to £45k max. I am noticing the 997.2 s around £37k - £48k price right now, is that the current market price? Obviously that varies per car £37k being 85k miles type

Sourcing = So far I have looked for probably 2 weeks and found nothing, I have heard they are harder to source but did not expect it to be this limited , however makes sense given its a sought after and "old" model. I am using pistonheads, autotrader. I am London based but could travel. Anyone have recommendation on independent dealers to contact? So far I have contacted Portiacraft

Other things = I have heard about people getting a Purchase inspection - how do I go about this? Would it be needed if I purchase from a notable independent dealer still?
I am paying in cash fully - so I assume I have bargaining power off the list price perhaps? Do I need to do anything different paying fully in cash/debit card to give me some buyer protection?
How would you approach the purchase with steps broken down as simple as possible? book a test drive, negotiate terms, then do I need to insure it or do anything else on that day ? What other costs do I need to consider?

summary:
making first car purchase using cash (only driven a shared family vehicle), any advice even simple things about 997.2 purchasing is appreciated
 
Might be worth going to somewhere like Paragon or Ashgood. I personally wouldn't bother with a pdi from somewhere like that. Doubt if you'll get much discount for cash, it's actually better for the dealer if you have finance as they usually get a commission.
You'll need tax and Insurance when you collect it but not before.
Good luck 👍
 
You will be covered by the dealers Insurance for test drive.

Northways, RSJ, 911 Virgin and Cameron Sportscars also worth a shout I would suggest.

You will have protection for 6 months on a dealer purchase I think under consumer rights act. In addition Most dealers will offer a warranty of some sort. You could get the car inspected post purchase by a Porsche Centre and get a Porsche warranty for peace of mind. Not cheap though...

I'd not bother with a PPI from a respected specialist, particularly on a 997.2.

Good hunting!
 
Robertb said:
You will be covered by the dealers Insurance for test drive.

Northways, RSJ, 911 Virgin and Cameron Sportscars also worth a shout I would suggest.

You will have protection for 6 months on a dealer purchase I think under consumer rights act. In addition Most dealers will offer a warranty of some sort. You could get the car inspected post purchase by a Porsche Centre and get a Porsche warranty for peace of mind. Not cheap though...

I'd not bother with a PPI from a respected specialist, particularly on a 997.2.

Good hunting!

Thank you for sharing - so if its a respected specialist - turn up, test drive and then basically just settle the bill
 
I'd add Dove House and Harbour to the list of indys. It would be worth calling them to state what you are looking for - they might know of a customer that is looking to change.

The gearbox will have an influence on value - manuals are relatively rarer than the PDK options and seem to be priced a bit higher.

The right cars at the good dealers will likely sell fast. The car I bought from Dove House went on after hours, I phoned at 8:59 the next morning to pay a deposit and they had 10+ calls about it before lunch. Ashgood appear to sell a bunch of things that are posted on their instagram before they are posted on the website.

I'd follow the social accounts of those that use them and if you feel confident enough that it is the right car when it comes up, phone and pay a deposit and view later.
 
I purchased a 997.2 C4S in 2016, buying the first car I viewed, which felt risky I can tell you!

I did my research and paid the extra to go gen.2 to avoid the nightmare fear of the engine going bang (even if only 5% probability). So you are clearly in the same place.

I ended up buying from a garage who were selling on commission for a private seller. Car still had a year of Porshe warrenty which takes a load off the mind if you can find it. However, I had only the service stamps in the book and no service details and Porsche would not give me these for data security reasons ggrrr.

What is worth knowing is that you can ask the dealer to give you the details from the ECU of how the car has been driven over its life. Can't remember the tech terms - somebody will help here - provides information on how long it has been in different rev ranges. Should be able to tell if it has been tracked. I concluded mine had been owned by an accountant :)

Secondly although the exterior colour was safe (deep navy blue) it was far from what I wanted. I was thinking of letting it go, until my son suggested wrapping to change the colour. This is worth knowing as we know that these cars are spec and colour sensitive, which means you can wait for ages for the right profile to come up, indeed if ever! It is an option when the interior and all else except colour are right, to go for it and just wrap to colour of choice. Might knock 6-12m off the hunt.

When I purchased in 2016 there must have been about half a dozen gen.2 coupe manual cars on the market, so quite limited choice. I looked a couple of weeks ago to check prices and there was 1.......
 
If your looking for a test drive, even if it's more just to try the S itself then it might be a good idea to ask on here if there's anyone close to you with a similar car who would give you a run out.

I only say this because one or two dealers will not allow you to take their cars out on a run, RSJ being the most notable.

I don't want to sound the bringer of bad news but you've picked the worst time of year to buy a car, especially a Porsche. It's March April when people start looking to fill the hole in the garage and as you've alluded, good cars get snapped up quickly. That and the fact there is a shortage of good stock means you'll have to have deep pockets to buy the right car.

One thing you are doing right is coming on here and asking questions, I didn't when I went after a car and I got mildly stung!
The 997.2 is a very good car and the .2 has a good engine and gearbox (PDK) I've given up with manuals completely, the PDK is such a fantastic gearbox I can't see the point in a manual. With spec you def need Sport Chrono, don't get to hung up on Sports seats as the std seats are very very good and obviously service history is a must, preferably OPC.
Good luck with your hunt just don't buy the first car you see, be patient.
 
As an afterthought, when you have purchased, put some wedge away for repairs and servicing. I bought mine with low miles and full service history, but I knew what needed doing as I had a pre purchase check doing beforehand which gave me some wiggle room on the price.

I paid 48K in 2017. I've spent 7k on it since the on servicing and repairs. I bought it with 32000 miles and now it has 59000. Surprisingly it's still worth close to what I paid for it which I was shocked about. C4S PDK Cab with max spec
 
I think most of your question have been answered by others however I would say that you might want to keep your search a little wider in terms of a non-S 997.2 or even 991.

I would buy on condition - rather than just a spec list.
I'm sure you could get a well sorted non-S for significantly less than your budget and I'm sure you would love it.

Equally your £45K budget could get you in a 991 if you are prepared to look around for a bit.

Its not uncommon for others to spend 6 months+ looking for a good value car with a good spec that is in good condition.

Good luck with the search and keep asking questions. :)
 
andrews7889 said:
I think most of your question have been answered by others however I would say that you might want to keep your search a little wider in terms of a non-S 997.2 or even 991.

I would buy on condition - rather than just a spec list.
I'm sure you could get a well sorted non-S for significantly less than your budget and I'm sure you would love it.

Equally your £45K budget could get you in a 991 if you are prepared to look around for a bit.

Its not uncommon for others to spend 6 months+ looking for a good value car with a good spec that is in good condition.

Good luck with the search and keep asking questions. :)

Another question I had - if I buy privately vs independent dealer ( Im leaning towards independent for the less time needed/hassle/no need for PPI/some warranty e.t.c), it would be wise to get a PPI because I know very little about cars/porsche

how would that process work privately. I pay the seller a deposit, and tell him that the car needs to be at X location for the PPI and obviously cover the cost of the PPI?
Im a bit confused as I would obviously not own the car yet but I would only want to pay fully provided it had a good PPI?
 
When I sold a C4S, we did that. We dropped car with local Porsche independent agreed with buyer. They made a report. He paid for the car.

You might not find all private sellers are up for that, but you can ask. There are also people that work mobile doing PPI.

For a private sale of a 12 year old 911, you probably want to check the seller as much as the car. If they've had it a while they'll have the service history and all the repairs while they owned it. They should have started replacing suspension parts, likely brakes and probably more besides. Expect to see and hear about that.
 
I agree with others, no need for a PPI on a gen 2 but look out for the brakes (disc/pads) and importantly air on condensers.
 
As above, buy on condition and history.

Speak to Mark at Stirlings - not what you pay, but what it will cost you in the first year! Prep and recommendations therefore also key.
 
Seventy Seven said:
As above, buy on condition and history.

Speak to Mark at Stirlings - not what you pay, but what it will cost you in the first year! Prep and recommendations therefore also key.

+1 for Mark @ Stirlings. I'd certainly add them to the list of aforementioned reputable dealers.
 
Echo the comments on test drives. If you've never owned any Porsche before, it's quite difficult to drop a relatively large amount of cash on one without actually knowing if I'd actually like driving it!!

A couple of dealers wanted a (refundable) deposit before a test drive which I guess weeds out the time wasters and some had a no test drive policy when I was looking. Maybe they just didn't like me.

I bought mine from a non specialist so had a PPI, the dealer was very good about letting them do it. I tried the specialists mentioned, and even though the market was a bit quieter when I bought, some were ok at getting back to me but most I had to chase, so bear that in mind.

Whilst all the specialists mentioned have a good rep, one actually did some work on my car, damaged it and didn't tell me. Another Indy found the damage which was a little annoying to say the least. So even though you're buying from one, still do your due diligence (if not necessarily a PPI).

All in all, they're great cars and easily used as a daily. Don't discount the 3.6, they're still pretty sweet but generally less well optioned
 

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