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Carrera S Restoration Thread

Some great content in here. Thanks for sharing.
Has cleaning the hvac fan solved the erratic temperature?
I think I might be suffering the same thing...
 
rob_p said:
Some great content in here. Thanks for sharing.
Has cleaning the hvac fan solved the erratic temperature?
I think I might be suffering the same thing...

Yes - it seems to have done. Quite easy to do and completely free so worth a try!
 
A great write up of an interesting project. Keep it coming :)
 
At least the Christmas lockdown is giving us all time to spend on car jobs! Although some of the bits I have ordered are taking a very long time to arrive...

Main task for me though was sorting out the threaded wheel bolts. Luckily my Dad is an engineer served his apprenticeship as a tool maker at Parsons in Newcastle working on turbines. Fixing something like this is bread and butter for him so, once I had the relevant parts I drove the car up to my parents (before this tier 4 lockdown stuff!). The cool thing was getting use a tool that he actually made in sixties to use for cleaning the threads on the hub.

gbkYS4w.jpg


Cleaning the threads did not take long as only the first couple of threads were damaged.

giieR5v.jpg


We didn't have a stock big enough for the die nut but managed to clamp it in a vice and then run the bolt through the die to re-cut the threads on the bolt. A little bit of copper grease and everything was running smoothly - which was a big relief as replacing the hub would have been a big pain when it was completely unnecessary...

With that fixed I decided to get my double DIN head unit install finished. I had not been able to get the FM signal since installing the new unit and some research suggested there is a white wire in the loom which supplies power to the aerial. For some reason this is not connected to anything with the new harness adapter, which seems strange. Luckily there was a Y connector with a spare switched live on the harness so I ran a wire and have scotch locked this for now to test and now have FM. I have ordered the ISO pins so I can take this into the harness properly later on.

fCqwOKI.jpg


The new radio also has DAB, and although I dont really use it as the signal in my area seems to be rubbish, I wanted it to work. I had ordered a discreet JVC DAB aerial and managed to find an easy route under the dash and up the A pillar to run this so it pops out just under the headlining on the windscreen. I've mounted the aerial on the black surface of the screen so it is all but invisible.

rUrdKLO.jpg


Reception seems to be good when there is a signal. There is practically no signal outside my house and FM seems to work fine so can't see myself using it but at least it's working now!
 
James Ball said:
A great write up of an interesting project. Keep it coming :)

Thanks! Have a few more jobs to keep me busy over Christmas!
 
I've been ticking off the jobs over Christmas and happy with progress.

I had the common oil pressure erratic reading issue so had bought a URO part a couple of weeks back in preparation to fit this along with a set of crow feet spanners. It looks really awkward to get to but with the right combination of tools is not too bad. I had the 19mm spanner fitted to a medium length extension and 3/8 ratchet, but it was really tight and I couldn't release it. I tried my bigger 1/2 ratchet with an adapter and still it wouldn't budge.

VW3hHMu.jpg


I started to wonder if access from underneath would be easier but had the heat shields in the way. In the end I used a 1/2 inch breaker bar and that popped it off easily. From there I could remove it just with my fingers. The new part was easy to tighten up by hand and then nip up using the german torque setting of 'guten tight'.

New sender in place at the back on the right:

L4AtbNx.jpg


Pressure is all good and the needle moves smoothly between readings so I think that's job done and there's no weeping from the new sender.

I've noticed on some night drives that the lights could be a little better, so I upgraded the HID's with Osram Nightbreaker units. Best price was Powerbulbs.co.uk at about £87, still pricey but worth a go. I also upgraded the side lights with some error free LED's, mainly because the colour was so yellow compared to the HID's but also to add a bit of light. I'm not sure there is a massive difference with these but I do think I'm switching to high beam less... :dont know:

This is before with Philips Blue halogen side lights:

4SPAPTX.jpg


And after with the LED's and Nightbreakers:

hnepPZb.jpg


I've also been replacing some of the missing emergency items and found a toolkit and air compressor on eBay:

WQDxUQv.jpg


These air compressor's seem to sell for silly money, £100 as buy it now. I just missed out on one which went in an auction for £36. Eventually I bought one for £80 which also came with the carpeted tool tray, the tool kit, spare tyre gel and a warning triangle. I don't need the last two and have two tool kits now (although one was missing the headlight tool). I'll pop the others on eBay and see if I can recover some of that! It all goes towards more parts after all!
 
Another time consuming little project was the interior door handles. These were a bit scratched and tatty, caused by someone opening the door with their keys in the hand no doubt. I had touched them up already with a silver sharpie, which was a good match and made a difference but still not great...

7IdRKqX.jpg


A rub down with 600 paper seemed to get through the marks:

0mlH49D.jpg


Followed by 2 coats of primer:

628aPUg.jpg


Drying time was a bit of a pain so I decided to make use of the oven and popped them on a baking tray and grease proof paper at 100 degrees for about 15 minutes between coats, waiting for them to cool again before the next coat! Obviously Mrs Stan was very happy about this! :hand:

Some Porsche Arctic Silver I had leftover from my 996 days was a perfect colour match for the interior silver:

2qvdSPM.jpg


Followed by 2 coats of clear coat lacquer:

m8cXNwv.jpg


Re-fitted these have really lifted the interior, a nice job ticked off I think.

GnNiHYZ.jpg


EyvLXch.jpg
 
stanuk964996 said:
Another time consuming little project was the interior door handles. These were a bit scratched and tatty, caused by someone opening the door with their keys in the hand no doubt. I had touched them up already with a silver sharpie, which was a good match and made a difference but still not great...

Excellent work :thumbs:
 
will.wessonuk said:
Great work. It looks very good with the suspension changes!

Thanks. I think the combo of Eibach's and 15/7mm spacers works well. Picked up some parts this morning and couldn't resist the photo op. I think the 997 looks well against the modern stuff!

qWEcXrD.jpg
 
Ticked off another little annoyance the other day with my non-working boot light. A quick check with my multimeter determined I had power to the switch/latch so it wasn't a programming issue, which I have read about on some cars. Easy to check by popping off the connector under the carpet:

z2Zb1RS.jpg


4cVVxN2.jpg


The latch comes out easily with 2x 10mm bolts and the switch itself is on the left under the plastic cover.

WYsUsUu.jpg


Once out the metal backing plate just comes off to reveal the mechanism and the plastic cover holding the microswitch.

npQl4PC.jpg


MCWsG6M.jpg


Two plastic tabs secure the switch to the lock mechanism, so carefully pry these off with a small screwdriver being careful not to snap them - especially in this cold weather!

OJOy1wr.jpg


The switch itself is the grey box at the bottom with a plunger activated by the white cam. This cam was stopping just short of activating the switch as the switch itself worked once separated from the mechanism. You can see we have light (hurrah!) once the switch is manually depressed.

avgkKDN.jpg


The cam mechanism was gritty and obviously dirty so I soaked it in isopropyl alcohol and gave it a liberal dose of WD40 but the action was still not enough to activate the switch once re-assembled.

dZx2nno.jpg


Grease would have been too heavy and I didn't have any light oil to hand but I did have some olive oil leftover from Christmas dinner! A little teaspoon of extra virgin did the trick! A life lesson there I think! I cleaned the remaining parts and applied some copper slip to the bolts and mating surfaces and it's been working perfectly since. Another satisfying free fix, especially when the replacement part is about £150!

The money shot:

luoS4MT.jpg
 
Looking good Stan keep the posts coming. Out of curiosity is your 964 the same featured on Jayemm YT blog?

k


stanuk964996 said:
will.wessonuk said:
Great work. It looks very good with the suspension changes!

Thanks. I think the combo of Eibach's and 15/7mm spacers works well. Picked up some parts this morning and couldn't resist the photo op. I think the 997 looks well against the modern stuff!

qWEcXrD.jpg
 
Alam said:
Looking good Stan keep the posts coming. Out of curiosity is your 964 the same featured on Jayemm YT blog?

:yes:

That is mine, yes...
 
Lovely thread. Wish I had the quarter of your DIY skills!!

And shows the finished result with eibach perfectly.. not too low. Not too high. Basically perfect.
 

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