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Brakes 996tt few basic q's

Tim F

Silverstone
Joined
28 Sep 2013
Messages
104
Couldn't see an FAQ on this so feel free to point one out if there is one! I have EBC yellow stuff on the car at the moment, not all that happy with the brake performance (not to mention the dust). It sees ok but not much more than that. How much difference will better pads make? Any recommendations for 99% road use?

Also which is the most effective big brake kit? I know Brembo do one and I believe you can fit 997 GT2 as well?

Any other useful info?

Thanks, Tim
 
996tt has very good brake setup as standard and unless you track there is no point of getting bigger calipers.

EBC are not the best pads for Porsche. They are ok for cars like VW or Ford but not Porsche, specially 996tt.

To start you should look in to your calipers? what's your milage and has the calipers been serviced before?
Than for fast road you can look at Ferodo ds2500, Pagid RS 14/19 and Performance Friction pads.
Braided lines are the must as well and specially if your rubber ones are older than 4 years.
Brake fluid change (not top up) needs to be done at least every 2 years. I will recommend every year (it's 2h job for all 4 corners).

Thomas
 
Callipers have 40k on them and unlikely to have been serviced. Pads and disks were put on by new by the last owner very recently. Is there any way to check calliper condition quickly?

Cheers, Tim
 
Oh the garage I'm at said not to worry about the lines, any reason why they'd need replacing, this is conflicting advice! :D
 
Tim F said:
Oh the garage I'm at said not to worry about the lines, any reason why they'd need replacing, this is conflicting advice! :D
Rubber lines will expand under hard braking making the pedal feel spongy.
This is eliminated by installing braided lines.

Your garage just checked the lines for any leaks so no need for replacement from they point of view. If you want get the most from your brakes than they are the must.
They will not stop the car quicker, they will make your brake pedal solid hard.
 
Upgraded mine to GT3 motorsport callipers and GT3 discs.

These are 6 piston callipers with 350mm discs.

Big difference.

Got the setup through 9excellence.

The standard brakes are adequate for road use and track use, alot of people find them to be inadequate but I think its just down to them being very little servo assisted compared to modern cars, when you press the pedal hard you will find that they do stop, and stop well. Make sure your discs are not in need for a change, fresh fluid, maybe look into braided lines for a more progressive/accurate pedal feel.

There is however a noticeable improvement with the 6piston setup. A setup which I believe should have been standard on the Turbo from factory
 
Remote said:
Upgraded mine to GT3 motorsport callipers and GT3 discs.

These are 6 piston callipers with 350mm discs.

Big difference.

Got the setup through 9excellence.

The standard brakes are adequate for road use and track use, alot of people find them to be inadequate but I think its just down to them being very little servo assisted compared to modern cars, when you press the pedal hard you will find that they do stop, and stop well. Make sure your discs are not in need for a change, fresh fluid, maybe look into braided lines for a more progressive/accurate pedal feel.

There is however a noticeable improvement with the 6piston setup. A setup which I believe should have been standard on the Turbo from factory

Hence why i'm upgrading. Just got the 6 pots and acquiring the rest of the bits, Tom has helped me out from Porsche calipers.

I let my brother in law and a close friend drive mine and they both commented on the poor brakes, which I had to agree with. It already has braided lines and considering the work that's gone into the car (700hp) from the previous owner i'll assume the brakes had sine decent pads so I haven't bothered to investigate its gt3 calipers all the way.
 
What do you mean by poor brakes? Was it fade on the track or just that they needed pushing hard?

MC
 
Never ever, ever, ever, ever for the love of all thats holy, bother fitting yellow stuff pads.
They should be branded "Yellow stuff, for when standard just isnt crap enough"

Oh that goes for ANY car not just Porsche

G
 
MisterCorn said:
What do you mean by poor brakes? Was it fade on the track or just that they needed pushing hard?

MC

That was also my first thought. Not much point suggesting solutions without understanding the true nature of the perceived problem.
 
Braided lines

Thomas

Would you advise replacing a corroded rigid brake line with a braided hose, or are they only replacements for flexible hoses?

Thanks,

M
2004 C4S
 
If you mean me, i'm not after a solution, i've already actioned one which is 6pots.

Poor to me was no bite or feel, I thought they would rip my face off to look at them but instead I found myself slowing down a lot earlier as I had no confidence in them.

I'm expecting a bit more from the gt3 calipers and the general consensus appears to be more to my expectations.

I'll be running performance friction 06 pads and new fluid, ant recommendations on fluid? I don't need track fluid, just something decent. It currently has the blue stuff in it.
 
Re: Braided lines

str12 said:
Thomas

Would you advise replacing a corroded rigid brake line with a braided hose, or are they only replacements for flexible hoses?

Thanks,

M
2004 C4S
They are only to replace the flexi ones.

I will suggest of replacing corroded pipes as soon as possible as the screw might damage the caliper thread when undo the pipe.
This is most common problem if you leave it for long while corroded.
They are quite cheap and will last another 4-5 years.
Also replacing all bleed screws every I will say 3 years is handy too.

Beware as some garages only bleeds outside of the caliper. The inside one will get stack for good and will snap on the caliper next time someone will try to bleed it or remove it.
I know some garages which seams quite cheap do it when replacing brake fluid just to save time.
 
e8_pack said:
If you mean me, i'm not after a solution, i've already actioned one which is 6pots.

If you mean me, no, I didn't particularly mean you. :D
I was drawing attention to the fact that we don't really know what aspect of the OP's car's brakes he was complaining about:
a) their absolute ability to decelerate the car when braking hard,
or
b) the fact that Porsche brakes are not over-servoed like so many other cars, and need higher pedal forces than Porsche newbies coming from other brands are accustomed to. A feature which you yourself also alluded to in your first post above, and which comes up for discussion here on the forum every few weeks.

Depending on which of these is the case, the ensuing discussion would need to take quite a different course. Without clarifying the true nature of the complaint, the thread is less likely to lead to a quick resolution for the OP.
 
Solid or braided

Thanks for the reply Thomas.

I asked because my OPC noted minor corrosion on a front brake line but since they route above the front suspension it needs to be dropped and they want £700 to replace.

M
 

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