Porsche 911UK Forum

Welcome to the @Porsche911UK website. Register a free account today to become a member! Sign up is quick and easy, then you can view, participate in topics and posts across the site that covers all things Porsche.

Already registered and looking to recovery your account, select 'login in' and then the 'forget your password' option.

And the 8th greatest car in the world is.

Porsche

Well-known member
Joined
31 Dec 2002
Messages
12,731
header.jpg



[b:x3YDVLiAau]




10.
[u:x3YDVLiAau]
Another brilliant bit of lateral thinking on the part of 4Car readers, amongst the Ferraris and Porsches in our top ten, a classic, humble British hero. The Land Rover Series I made its debut in the late 1940s, and within a decade had become the recognised transport of intrepid adventurers across the globe.
spacer.gif


9.
[u:x3YDVLiAau]
Back in 1987, Enzo Ferrari decided the best way to celebrate 40 years of making the cars bearing his name was to create a totally focussed race car for the road. And in the F40, we have one of the most inspirational Ferraris of all time and one of the last to be touched by Enzo himself.
spacer.gif


8.
[u:x3YDVLiAau]
All prospective employees of 4Car are asked one question. "How do you feel about Porsche 911s?" And on the basis of its ranking here, we reckon that thousands of 4Car readers would make excellent staffers. Simply put, there is no GT that is better to drive, better built, or better evidence of engineering development triumphing brilliantly over physics (that's not the best place for the engine...)
[u:x3YDVLiAau]

[u:x3YDVLiAau]

[u:x3YDVLiAau]

[u:x3YDVLiAau]

[u:x3YDVLiAau]

[u:x3YDVLiAau]

[u:x3YDVLiAau]
spacer.gif


7.
[u:x3YDVLiAau]
One of the greatest examples of Anglo-American cooperation, the AC Cobra combined the balance, finesse and lightness of touch of a traditional British open sportscar with the iron fist of a Ford 289 V8 (4.7 litres). The result was one of the most characterful and desirable sportcars of the 1960s, something that 4Car readers were quick to recognise.
spacer.gif


6.
[u:x3YDVLiAau]
4Car asked design supremo Ian Callum, the guy responsible for the DB7, whether there was a bad angle anywhere on the stunning DB9. "Yes," he said. "Crawl underneath it and the view's not so good." We're also happy to report that this is the best Aston to drive of all time.
spacer.gif


5.
[u:x3YDVLiAau]
Famously, this was the car that Ford developed to kick Ferrari's butt after the Italian maker decided against selling out to the Blue Oval. A one-two-three finish at Le Mans made the point rather neatly, and this remains the most inspired car that Ford has ever produced. And even though it's a loud Yank, you voted for it. Well done!
spacer.gif


4.
[u:x3YDVLiAau]
This car was the product of pure genius. We take front-wheel drive and transverse-mounted engines for granted these days, but back in the late 1950s, this was a fantastically radical solution to packaging a small car. Then the Mini only went on to win the Monte Carlo rally...
spacer.gif


3.
[u:x3YDVLiAau]
The most beautiful car to emerge from Coventry, the E-Type was also a performance sensation, famously recording a 150mph top speed in the hands of Autocar magazine road testers. 4Car has spoken to Jaguar's then chief test driver Norman Dewis to chase up rumours that the car was a bit hooky. Norman simply described the engine as 'very well run in...'
spacer.gif


2.
[u:x3YDVLiAau]
This is the car that created the cult of the GTI. Now in its fifth generation, the original Golf GTI almost didn't happen back in the 1970s as the marketing folks at VW couldn't see that people would want to buy a small, sporting hatchback. A bit like the producer who dismissed the Beatles as a passing fad, really. Engineers persevered anyway, and a star was born.
spacer.gif

And the winner is...


Migration info. Legacy thread was 27823
 
winner.jpg


Its official: the McLaren F1 road car is the greatest automotive achievement of all time, as voted by the readers of 4Car. And I promise you, the fact that the F1 was also my own nominee for top spot had absolutely nothing to do with the final outcome. Honest.



You're a remarkably discerning lot, it has to be said. While I've had the enormous privilege of having driven the F1, I'm pretty sure that's not true of the vast majority of those who voted for it. So you were voting strictly on the basis of your knowledge of how significant this ground-breaking car really is, which is pretty impressive. And all these years later, the headline figures still amaze - three seats with a central driving position like a Formula One car, a 627bhp V12, 240mph and about one million dollars to you, sir.



As with so many of the finest things in life, it's existence is owed to the commitment and talent of a driven individual. In this case, its designer Gordon Murray. A veteran of Formula One race-car design, Murray set out with one purpose: to build the best road car of all time. "The F1 was created as the purest driver's car, compact and above all ultra-lightweight," he says. "It also embodies the most advanced engineering, intricate and elegant detailing and peerless quality."



Its chassis and bodywork are constructed from immensely strong, yet incredibly light and frighteningly expensive carbon fibre. So strong, in fact, that when the first prototype crashed in Namibia during testing, despite numerous rolls, the driver walked away unscathed. Meanwhile, no stone was left unturned in Murray's pursuit for perfection. Electric fans assist the creation of downforce, Kenwood created a premium sound system weighing just 8.5kg, the engine has no fly-wheel and the clutch is carbon fibre. When the car was still in production, each F1 took 2,250 hours to construct, obviously at huge expense.



Our own columnist Jay Leno owns an F1 (along with a mind-blowing selection of other hardware). So what does he reckon? "Well, the F1 is the greatest car of the 20th century," says Leno. "It sounds odd to say that but of all the cars from the year 1900 to the year 2000, the greatest of them all is the F1. There's a great deal of satisfaction in that when you drive it, knowing this is the best, the fastest. The weight of it feels German and the handling feels British."



The first time that I achieved 210mph-plus without the help of British Airways was aboard a McLaren. And I was there on the day that Andy Wallace (a brilliant driver and raconteur extraordinaire) set a road car speed record of 240.1mph at VW's test facility at Wolfsburg early in 1998. To say that this car changed the way I viewed the art of the possible is huge understatement. I'm with Leno on this one - Murray's achievement in creating a lightweight, shatteringly fast supercar that could be enjoyed by three people is an achievement unlikely to be matched, ever. Did I mention the engine bay lined with gold (for its heat reflecting properties) or the onboard toolkit made of titanium (for extreme strength and lightness)? Quite sensational.



So it's no surprise to me that you voted the McLaren F1 to be the greatest car of all time. Because, quite simply, it is.



Migration info. Legacy thread was 27824
 
So whos owned the most? A miserable 3 for me. No prizes for guessing the F1 isnt in those 3!

Migration info. Legacy thread was 27843
 
Number 2, and currently 4 (1966) & 8 (1989).

Migration info. Legacy thread was 27856
 

New Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
124,043
Messages
1,436,639
Members
48,433
Latest member
benny-g
Back
Top