Porsche 911 UK Enthusiasts Online Community Discussion Forum GB

Welcome to the @Porsche911UK website. Register a free account today to become a member! Sign up is quick and easy, then you can view, participate in topics and posts across the site that covers all things Porsche.

Already registered and looking to recovery your account, select 'login in' and then the 'forget your password' option.

996 with replacement engine - what SHALL I worry about?

tikkathree

Montreal
Joined
18 Aug 2013
Messages
539
I'm going to look at a 996 which had a replacement engine fitted by a Porsche dealer in April 2011 and which has now run 30,000 miles approx.

I'm sure that the paperwork will confirm what the vendor is saying about this event in the car's life (as well as everything else which has been serviced/replaced).

This replacement engine: will it be a 996 engine or a 997 engine? Is there a difference? How will I be able to identify what it is? Is a later engine less likely to suffer the catastrophic failures due to bore scoring etc or are the prospects just the same?

Other than the low engine mileage compared to the car's 89000 miles is there any way this isn't entirely a good thing?

The car is 2003 with a full service history (last major service July 2013), lots of other things done and plenty of MOT.
 
Do the usual checks and bargain hard as it has had a replacement engine. TBH that's a good thing, but haggle anyway as the car isn't as it left the factory. If all else checks out, buy it and enjoy.
 
Shurv said:
Do the usual checks and bargain hard as it has had a replacement engine. TBH that's a good thing, but haggle anyway as the car isn't as it left the factory. If all else checks out, buy it and enjoy.

Thanks Shurv. In my newbie state it seems to me better to buy a 996 which has had the engine sorted rather than buy one "all matching numbers" where there is a statistical likelihood of "replacement/rebuild required" being just around the corner, or the corner after that!
 
I had pistons and blocks replaced by Porsche Leicester, essentially a large part of having a new engine.
Comparing it to before the work was done, it runs smoother, it is quieter, more fuel efficient and has better power response.

Just so you know, a new engine from OPC would not very likely include all new ancillaries, so alternators, starter motors and so on are most likely from the original engine.

It is definitely a plus point for me. In terms of matching numbers, I certainly wouldn't worry about that it is not a collectors item. If someone tried to haggle me down on price when I sell mine because it has had this work done, Id correct them curtly and show them the door if they disagreed. The cost of the work I had done was £20k and that does not make it a less attractive prospect than something which has done 10ks of miles, not to mention the likelihood of my engine vs the car with the original engine having IMS issues or scored bores. I know full well which I would go for every day of the week.
In fact I was thinking of selling mine, but with a rebuilt engine it seems silly to do so.
 
In my view a replacement engine from Porsche will be no better that the one that went pop. They won't have changed anything so it will still have all the inherent problem of the original just with less mileage. Therefore no better of worse than anything else out there. If it had been rebuilt using new liners etc by someone like Hartech that would be different.
 
Sausage said:
I had pistons and blocks replaced by Porsche Leicester, essentially a large part of having a new engine.
Comparing it to before the work was done, it runs smoother, it is quieter, more fuel efficient and has better power response.

Just so you know, a new engine from OPC would not very likely include all new ancillaries, so alternators, starter motors and so on are most likely from the original engine.

Ah right. Thank you.

Sausage said:
It is definitely a plus point for me. In terms of matching numbers, I certainly wouldn't worry about that it is not a collectors item. If someone tried to haggle me down on price when I sell mine because it has had this work done, Id correct them curtly and show them the door if they disagreed. The cost of the work I had done was £20k and that does not make it a less attractive prospect than something which has done 10ks of miles, not to mention the likelihood of my engine vs the car with the original engine having IMS issues or scored bores. I know full well which I would go for every day of the week.
In fact I was thinking of selling mine, but with a rebuilt engine it seems silly to do so.

I'm not disagreeing with you: you spend all that money just putting the car back on the road, some cheeky young puppy wants a discount.

Rebuilt engine? Keep it enjoy it!
 
From what has been written above I'm pretty sure I'll be wrong here, but I thought on the modern 911s there was no such thing as 'matching numbers', as the engine number and chassis number weren't related in the first place. I'm probably getting it mixed up with another marque. I think I fried my brain reading too many car books. :eek:

MC
 
I'd treat it as a 2003 car with 89k miles and get it inspected and valued accordingly.

Note: 89k miles is above average and a car with a replacement engine is viewed by most people (rightly or wrongly - probably wrongly in the case of a 996) with a lot of caution which always makes resale more difficult.
 
MisterCorn said:
From what has been written above I'm pretty sure I'll be wrong here, but I thought on the modern 911s there was no such thing as 'matching numbers', as the engine number and chassis number weren't related in the first place. I'm probably getting it mixed up with another marque. I think I fried my brain reading too many car books. :eek:

MC

As OP can I say that I'm not beating myself up over matching numbers on anything. I used to collect historic military training rifles, so pre WWII, where matching numbers on all the component parts was seen as part of "collectibility" and matching was better than non-matching and yet we all knew that there were rifles about which had been made up.
I'm assuming that the number on the replacement engine will match an invoice.
So, the replacement engine, though younger, is still at risk of scoring it seems. I'm hoping that the current owner having paid for the replacement engine will have taken care to run the engine in a way designed to minimise the risk of scoring.
 
T8 said:
I'd treat it as a 2003 car with 89k miles and get it inspected and valued accordingly.

Note: 89k miles is above average and a car with a replacement engine is viewed by most people (rightly or wrongly - probably wrongly in the case of a 996) with a lot of caution which always makes resale more difficult.

T8: if the walkround/read the file/meet the owner/test drive goes well, a PPI would be a sound idea.

I'm building up a picture of the 996 as a car quite likely to have had a replacement engine.
There are interesting parallels to my current MGF which was prone to HGF especially if not warmed properly and maintained properly reducing the reputation of the car to disaster zone. And yet...
 
T8 said:
I'd treat it as a 2003 car with 89k miles and get it inspected and valued accordingly.

Note: 89k miles is above average and a car with a replacement engine is viewed by most people (rightly or wrongly - probably wrongly in the case of a 996) with a lot of caution which always makes resale more difficult.

It amazes me how people think a 10/12 year old car of this ilk is high mileage with 70/80K miles when average mileage has always been accepted as 12K a year, especially with all the mileage correct firms around I find it very hard to believe all these mileages are true.
 
JohnnyDangerous said:
It amazes me how people think a 10/12 year old car of this ilk is high mileage with 70/80K miles when average mileage has always been accepted as 12K a year, especially with all the mileage correct firms around I find it very hard to believe all these mileages are true.

Firstly, 89k isn't 70/80k.

Secondly, if you make a list of all the 10/12 year old 996s advertised on the internet and work out their average miles per year I bet you any money you like the average will be damn sight nearer 6k p.a than than 12k p.a.

12k per year is not the 'accepted' average mileage per year for a 996.

Some may be clocked but given that so many have history to corroborate the mileages I don't think it'll be a very high %.
 
AM123 said:
Hi

Is this a silver Carrera 4s?

a. I'm not telling you - I've got first dibs! :pc: :pc:

b. No it isn't. :thumb:

c. If I told you would you believe me? :floor:
 
Our of curiosity, does 89k - 30k = failed IMS at 59k?

Anyway, whether it does or not, the car you're buying now is the car as it is now. So, just treat it as such and buy it with the caution you would any 996.

The fact that it's got a replacement engine is neither here nor there.
 

New Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
124,313
Messages
1,444,073
Members
49,445
Latest member
AlfaMax1996
Back
Top