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996 driving/handling

PETE T

New member
Joined
2 Feb 2007
Messages
35
hi i have driven my 996 c2 53 plate for a couple of hundred miles now and when i push through corners and bends i cannot get the fact that the engine is at the back out of my mind,also the car tends to understeer at anything aproaching decent speeds is this the built in saftey of the 996 or is it me getting old/not wanting to bend my car,some one posted a thread to me saying it was worth paying to have lessons in the 996 when i got it a week ago. Is this the case does the 996 have different handling /driving methods than other rear wheel drive cars.the car has been set up set up at opc dealership has done 16k miles seems to have good grip at the back but understeers when pushed,very little body roll,any comments,tips would be helpfull.regards pete


Migration info. Legacy thread was 116432
 
They are prone to understeer due to the lack of weight over the front. Often you read road tests of cars which seem to indicate that cars begin to underteer first as speed rises before becoming more neutral then into oversteer, as you say, engineered-in safety.

It could well be that a different driving technique could make it feel more satisfying- I've always gained most satisfaction from a car when I've gotten it on a proving ground with an instructor.


Migration info. Legacy thread was 116438
 
As a factory setting, all 996s - even GT3s will understeer to an extent when pushed hard into bends. Whilst set up like this the most efficient technique is to go slower into then hard and fast on the way out using the extra grip afforded by the weight over the rear axle. The old adage of 'slow in fast out' is quite apt!

To lessen the intital understeer you'd have to get a geometry set up from one of the bigger independants who can lessen these characteristics and give a sharper turn in, though the C2 is not infinately adjustable in this department.

A more grippy tyre could also give you more confidence on the initial turn in speeds.


Migration info. Legacy thread was 116440
 
thanks,slow in fast out thats a technique i was used to in the 80s driving a ford capri on the oval tracks will do some reading on tyres and such to see what else can be done to lesson the efects of the understeer.cheers pete

Migration info. Legacy thread was 116444
 
Its worth getting your geo checked out once a year, esp. if you plan to track the car at all, so if you're near JZM or someone like that - they'll be able to dial out a bit of the understeer and make the front end more 'pointy'.

They are grippy cars though and are capable of lots of traction on power out of a bend!


Migration info. Legacy thread was 116448
 
assuming you've had tyres checked, same brand front/rear correct pressure etc, obvious but sometimes even obvious can be overlooked. Followed a 911 the other day and when it slowed down I could clearly see two different tread patterns on each rear! mad or what?


Migration info. Legacy thread was 116720
 
All production cars have built in understeer to some extent, simply because most drivers panic and lift off throttle if the car starts to slide. If you are already oversteering that's not good!

Classic recent example of a car sold to Joe Public with alleged 'handling' issues was the Audi TT: If you had an early one without ESP (like me) and braked hard from 100mph plus, back end almost lifts off the tarmac... if you then try and steer at the same time, it tries to kill you! (Succeeded in a couple of cases in Germany :eek: ).

Now, any decent race instructor will smack your legs if you ever brake whilst cornering hard (unless being really flash and left foot braking), and it says not to do that in the handbook, but the families concerned got a lot of money out of Audi, and all cars were recalled to have ESP, rear spoilers and soggy suspension fitted (to frighten the life out of the numpties, long before cornering speeds got that critical... :wink: )

So... we all get lumbered with understeer as a result, and I reckon it won't be too long before all cars have to have stability control as standard - by law - and goodness knows what else to protect us from ourselves! :evil:


Migration info. Legacy thread was 116742
 
slow in, fast out... harder on the brakes, load up the front, get the rear light, turn-in, back on the gas, load up the rear, use the traction... use the rear weight to swing the car around the bend by getting on the gas a bit sooner towards the apex.

best to try on circuit at a place like Bedford.

Migration info. Legacy thread was 116777
 
wil do,dont fancy practising on the roads.cheers pete

Migration info. Legacy thread was 116881
 
Yep-Bedford is a great place to learn. I had a day there and had some instruction. It was not long until I was spinning off as regulaly as Sundeep :wink:

Seriously though it taught me how to get over the understeer issue without hitting anything. Its flat out now!


Migration info. Legacy thread was 116890
 
Previous poster said:
Quote: Originally posted by Wattie on 12 February 2007

Classic recent example of a car sold to Joe Public with alleged 'handling' issues was the Audi TT: If you had an early one without ESP (like me) and braked hard from 100mph plus, back end almost lifts off the tarmac... if you then try and steer at the same time, it tries to kill you! (Succeeded in a couple of cases in Germany :eek: ).
More than just a couple, and to compound the insult, Audi acknowledged that the production TT had designed-in lift-off over-steer. I saw several post accident photographs at the time and strangely, nearly all the cars were fitted with steel rims and not alloys.




Migration info. Legacy thread was 116910
 

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