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1998 C2 will I be able to run on E10 fuel

simonkay1

Silverstone
Joined
23 Oct 2009
Messages
124
Is there anything that needs to be done to allow my early 1998 C2 run on this new fuel or should it be ok?

Thanks in advance
 
Having seen what E5 does to the internals of motorcycle fuel taps when left over winter, I wouldn't go near it with a barge pole.

Ethanol if left, goes off and turns acidic. It will eat away at aluminium and destroyed all the fuel taps on my 4 bikes which I recommissioned last year.

If they're not getting regular turn over of fresh fuel, I add a dose of Briggs & Stratton Fuel Fit, which is designed to stop it destroying petrol lawnmowers over winter. E10 will be twice as bad.

I will deliberately hunt for fuel with low Ethanol content.

This pushing of Ethanol is nothing more than profiteering and forcing petrol cars off the road at a younger age. I presume it carries less duty as 5-10% is apparently free from creating plant food? CO2 is NOT the enemy here.
Climate fascism is just being used as an excuse to push an agenda.

https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/146296/global-green-up-slows-warming
 
YPVS said:
Having seen what E5 does to the internals of motorcycle fuel taps when left over winter, I wouldn't go near it with a barge pole.

Ethanol if left, goes off and turns acidic. It will eat away at aluminium and destroyed all the fuel taps on my 4 bikes which I recommissioned last year.

If they're not getting regular turn over of fresh fuel, I add a dose of Briggs & Stratton Fuel Fit, which is designed to stop it destroying petrol lawnmowers over winter. E10 will be twice as bad.

I will deliberately hunt for fuel with low Ethanol content.

This pushing of Ethanol is nothing more than profiteering and forcing petrol cars off the road at a younger age. I presume it carries less duty as 5-10% is apparently free from creating plant food? CO2 is NOT the enemy here.
Climate fascism is just being used as an excuse to push an agenda.

https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/146296/global-green-up-slows-warming


That doesn't sound good seeing as there is a lot of Aluminium in our engines. I assume that the normal unleaded fuel will still be available but albeit at a premium price. :dont know:
 
Quite a lot of good information available from the various classic car clubs or forums. This has a some good reliable information
https://www.fbhvc.co.uk/fuels
As far as I can make out the top grades (Super etc) of fuels that we are recommended to use anyway will stay at 5% so probably for most 911 owners it shouldn't have too much effect in the short/med term. What happens after the 5 year moratorium period remains to be seen.

Cheers........Ian
 
https://www.porsche.com/uk/aboutporsche/pressreleases/pcgb/?lang=none&pool=uk&id=2011-05-23-classic

Compatibility of E10 fuel with Porsche vintage cars and recent classics
Verify your classic car's compatibility of E10 fuel with the help of our overview
E10 is a fuel which contains a higher proportion of ethanol than previous petrol formulations. The 'E" stands for ethanol. The number '10" indicates that the fuel contains up to 10% ethanol. Previously the proportion of ethanol in petrol was up to 5%.

E10 fuels are suitable for refuelling and thus for running all Porsche vehicles as of year of construction 1996. Specifically, the Boxster (model year 1997) and Carrera (model year 1998) models onwards.

These new fuels, which can include up to 10% ethanol in the future in accordance with new statutory regulations, can be used in all new Porsche vehicles without any problems.
 
Thanks guys, some good information there, especially the quote from Porsche that it is ok to use in our cars.

From my understanding of the info you have pointed me towards, using fuel with a lower Ethanol content (5%) seems to be the way to go along with corrosion inhibitor additives. However, it is worrying that it may also eat away at things like fuel lines, gaskets etc. along with the possibility of power loss due to leaner burning of the fuel.

I guess along with the Government, the manufacturers will be happy because they will be selling more spares.

Ho hum, the joys of owning a Classic car.
 
If you use the car as a daily, it won't be much of an issue.

The problem with Ethanol is shelf life. If it sits for extended periods of time, such as classic cars, lawn mowers, classic motorcycles etc, which could have the same fuel in for months, then it becomes an issue as it goes off and turns acidic.

The additive can be poured in to keep the fuel stable if storing up over winter.
 
This was why I asked the question in the first place, mine is not a daily driver and can sit for 4/5 weeks with the same fuel in the tank (sometimes longer). Would this be an issue with the new fuel?
 
I presume that most of us currently run on super E5 and will just continue to do so :dont know:
 
simonkay1 said:
This was why I asked the question in the first place, mine is not a daily driver and can sit for 4/5 weeks with the same fuel in the tank (sometimes longer). Would this be an issue with the new fuel?

In most areas of the country (apart from some parts of the West Country - maybe others, worth checking), Esso 99 is free of ethanol.
 
Funny in a way, I remember when you could buy E85 at (of all places Morrisons) and we sometimes had our cars queued around the block to buy it.

Why? Because the cars were turbo-charged and the higher the Ethanol content the higher the octane - E85 is 108 octane.

Nowadays, because it's the bike hauler and shopping fetcher I put 97 RON Sainsbury's Super Unleaded in the E63, which at 91 octane is giving it significantly weaker performance than the E85 I used to put in the T5 (from a fuel perspective). The amount of timing and boost that the Volvo could run on that fuel without knocking was immense, but the E63 will give 550 horsepower on the Sainsbury's stuff and anyway, I have a 911 for the "hair's on fire" side of driving.

If I had a 911 Turbo I would absolutely 100% be buying E85 in 208 litre barrels, with a flex fuel sensor determining how much of the good stuff was in the tank.

Anyway - these biofuels can give a significant performance advantage (although you'll burn more of them), and it's clearly the direction of travel for ICE (before we're all driving warp-speed milk-floats), so my suggestion is that we embrace it.
 
Esso 99 ron is Ethanol free. They say E5, but the reality is for now there is no ethanol at all.



Remember that E10 has a shelf life of only 2-3 months as well. For some who only use their cars occasionally it is something to consider.

Edit: Sorry, missed that you had already mentioned this.

lk993 said:
In most areas of the country (apart from some parts of the West Country - maybe others, worth checking), Esso 99 is free of ethanol.


In fact looking back I missed the reply about shelf life too.
 
Dammit said:
it's clearly the direction of travel for ICE (before we're all driving warp-speed milk-floats), so my suggestion is that we embrace it.

You first... :lol:

However, before filling up with E85 check your car is compatible with fuel. Most petrol vehicles aren't, and using it could cause loss of power, fuel economy, or even lasting damage to your engine.
 
I would think that any ICE car still running in 30 years will be running on Ethanol/Methanol or converted to EV. Changes are coming, and what they are is clear.

My 911 isn't turbo charged, so no need for super high octane fuel to resist knock. I would, as a matter of course, make sure my engine was happy with increasing amounts of ethanol in fuel when rebuilding it though.
 
YPVS said:
Having seen what E5 does to the internals of motorcycle fuel taps when left over winter, I wouldn't go near it with a barge pole.

Ethanol if left, goes off and turns acidic. It will eat away at aluminium and destroyed all the fuel taps on my 4 bikes which I recommissioned last year.

If they're not getting regular turn over of fresh fuel, I add a dose of Briggs & Stratton Fuel Fit, which is designed to stop it destroying petrol lawnmowers over winter. E10 will be twice as bad.

I will deliberately hunt for fuel with low Ethanol content.

This pushing of Ethanol is nothing more than profiteering and forcing petrol cars off the road at a younger age. I presume it carries less duty as 5-10% is apparently free from creating plant food? CO2 is NOT the enemy here.
Climate fascism is just being used as an excuse to push an agenda.

https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/146296/global-green-up-slows-warming

The fuel system has barely any aluminium components, aren't the hard line steel? Normally fuel taps are brass are they not?

Anyway Porsche say it's fine so it's fine. If ethanol content continues to increase its not a huge job to swap out the fuel hoses if required. The hard lines and fuel rail should be ok, maybe change the injector O-rings.
 

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