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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6382
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 5:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I dicided to try and fit the bonnet badge today using the gasket I had. It was not as hard as I thought it would be and I just retained the gasket in place during fitting with some very thin double sided tape.

The gromet/retaining nut design has obviously changed at some point as the original ones effectively screwed into the rear badge pins but the new ones just had a very soft / sticky rubber which the pin pushes through.

In the end it took all of 2 minutes to change the badge.

You can see on the original badge where the enamel had started to discolour.....






and the new badge fitted....


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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6382
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 6:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm almost there with the interior of the car now. I have been "de Blueing" it and the final piece was to replace the blue handbrake lever.

Now a new standard handbrake is c£290 Surprised so once again I was on the eBay bargain trail and chuffed to bits when I sourced a perfect black item for <£100 delivered Smile

It is second hand but as new and even still had the metal attaching rod which you usually need to transfer over from your old handbrake lever.




So on with the install............

This is a very easy DIY and just a little fiddly lining up holes etc.... when refitting.

Firstly remove the rear storage tray / cassette holder in the normal way. This then reveals two securing screws for the handbrake undertray. The 3rd retaining screw is under the handbrake itself but is pretty easy to get at.




Look how much crap is in the screw indent Surprised




You can then slide the base cover over the handbrake lever (helps if handbrake raised and gear stick in 1st to give more room)




I found the obligatory coin under there Rolling Eyes




Now to get the old handbrake out.......

You have to remove a retaining clip (just use a flat head screwdriver to lever out as you pull it up)






once the retaining clip is removed you can knock through the main retaining bolt






Then it is simply a matter of removing the two adjusting bolts from the rear of the mechanism (nb the back one acts as a lock nut for the first so unscrew that first to give the other room to unscrew).....








As the nuts get towards the end of the rod they are attached to you can start to pull the handbrake lever forward to allow room for the nuts to be unscrewed off.......




Then I noticed my car had made another 1p. Who says widebodies don't make money Hand




anyway both nuts removed....




You can now pull the handbrake lever fully free.....




At this point you will get a big piece of metal fall out and you will panic "what have I broken" Embarassed
Don't worry it the ratchet mechanism which is easy to put back into the new handbrake lever for refitting.

The original handbrake lever with a 964 part number...




If your fitting a brand new handbrake lever you would now have to swap over the metal rod to the new one but my second hand one already had this fitted so saved me a job.

Refitting the new lever is a simply reversal of removal but first you need to get the ratchet back in place in the lever. There are only two ways it can go and the right way is so the teeth mesh with the handbrake correctly and the small retaining indent is visible at the bottom. This indent slides under the metal bar below the handbrake which you have probably not noticed is there yet......








Here you can see how the indent go under the metal bar on the car to secure the ratchet mechanism in place during refitting.....




So now its simply a matter of pushing the metal rod back in place just enough to place the two nuts back onto the thread.

Then push the handbrake so the main retaining bolt can be pushed back through whilst at the same time ensuring the ratchet indent is under the metal bar (its easier than it sounds). Once the main securing bolt is through the lever you can put its retaining clip back in place.

Now simply do the rear adjusting nut up to you get 4 to 5 ratchet clicks to fully engage the handbrake. Once its right then do up the rear locking nut to fix it in place.

Put back the under tray (reversal of removal) and the job is done.

The finished install........




I'm really pleased with how this has all come together. I remember sitting in the car when I was deciding whether to purchase or not and telling myself to see past the sea of blue. Its now as I imagined it and probably my perfect spec inside ie full leather and two tone dark blue / black Very Happy
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6382
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 6:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I managed to fit in a 2 hour blast in the glorious sunshine today. Stayed off the local coast roads (full of tourists) and stuck to my favourite B roads.

The car is really beginning to feel like mine now, I just love it. They really are just such a solid feeling car on the road and boy do they get some looks from passer by Smile

One things has become clear, I looooooove the MPL clutch slave cylinder. Now that I'm used to it it really has transformed the drive of the car for the better making it a much easier and even more pleasurable driving experience.

I am still smiling an hour later thinking of that glorious engine noise on full chatter mid overtake with full height brambles roadside wrapping the sound around the car...... fantastic
ps thats something I just could never do in the F430, widebody or not these cars just feel so nimble on the narrow B roads. The Ferrari's feel massive in comparison.
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dommorton
Zolder


Joined: 16 Mar 2008
Posts: 5062


1998 Porsche 993 Carrera 4S

PostPosted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 7:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a very good point. Even in widebody form, these cars are actually pretty small compared to most of today's offerings.
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6382
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 9:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some of the overtakes I did today I would not have attempted in a larger car !
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6382
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Sun Jul 07, 2013 2:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Was going to fit the sill trims today but.......... too nice so did a few "chores".

I grabbed a couple of pics on my iPhone whilst out on my travels.........










and the best thing is I got to drive it as well Bandit
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6382
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Tue Jul 09, 2013 10:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I finally got around to fitting the engine air filter and cabin pollen filters yesturday.

For the pollen filters I followed OC's great little guide HERE

This is one of those fiddly little jobs that would take you 5 minutes when you've done it once but the first time I spent 20 minutes and some swear words trying to get the cover back on the first one Damn

However once you realise you have to try and drop them in from as square above as possible and get a certain part dropping into a grove then its dead easy Rolling Eyes

Trim removed to reveal a nice clean area to work




LHS Pollen filter cover off




New and old for LHS




New and old for RHS




New RHS pollen filter fitted




I have no benchmark to know if these needed changing or not. Compared to normal air filters they look not too bad but by changing them now at a known date / future driving I can check them and compare to the ones I have taken off over time.


and then to one of the easiest maintenance jobs you will get on most engines = change the engine air filter

my "sport" engine air filter cover to be removed by simply releasing two clips and pulling off a rubber hose...




Old and new filters for comparison. This filter definately needed changing...




and fitted in place




the view from the air intake when the cover is replaced




Another couple of OCD jobs off the list Very Happy
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6382
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Thu Jul 11, 2013 10:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some more goodies arrived yesturday.......


Whilst I was changing the handbrake lever last week I had chance to examine the under tray more closely and it did not meet OCD standards Rolling Eyes

So I decided to get a replacement but thought it worthwhile getting a carbon fibre one to match the gearstick.....

I sourced one from Eurocup GT but ended up getting the matching rear RS tray as it was cheaper to buy the two together Rolling Eyes

I was expecting a carbon wrapped item (ie OEM tray wrapped) so was very pleased to get genuine carbon fibre.

However there were two issues. Firstly they only sent the handbrake tray and not the rear RS tray PC but also there is a slight flaw in the carbon top finish which I have rejected.

I have spoken to them on the phone today and they where very polite, apologised for getting the order wrong and are sending out replacement items today and I will return the one I have. I'm a great believer in anyone can make mistakes its how you deal with them that matters. so far so good.

Here is the Handbrake tray. You can clearly see the genuine carbon fibre weave. It is very light and strong but you can also see the slight flaw on the left hand side (a bit is raised)....








The second item I bought off them was a strut brace. I've ran strut braces on most of my performance cars and even body and butt braces on some (although I have had to remove the body and butt braces off my roady due to clearance issues).

This one seems very well finished and is very light so will be interesting to see if it makes any perceivable difference on the twisties. I'm sure it will look cool though Smile

I'll post up more when I get the chance to fit it. The only difficult bit should be getting a neat cut in the boot carpet for it to fit through.

My daughter thought it was a new toy when I unpacked it Hand






Surprisingly prices for Porsche Strut braces seem cheap compared to good BMW ones for some reason Dont know
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6382
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 8:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another eBay bargain Very Happy

I only have a couple of spaces left for stamps in the cars service book but had read that new service books where hard to get hold of. So I've had it in my mind to speak to my local OPC (which is not that local) about sourcing one. I was pleasantly surprised one day last week when logging into eBay to find a brand new (still sealed with OPC stickers) was advertised for sale at £16 Buy It Now. I could not click on the BUY button quickly enough Very Happy. I think these are c£25 from an OPC (if they can get them) and I would have been prepared to pay a lot more which is what I call a real bargain Bandit




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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6382
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 11:40 am    Post subject: Front Strut Brace Reply with quote

Front Strut Brace fitment:

Firstly for those who are not sure what the purpose of a font strut brace is on a 993 here is the theory.....

"A strut bar, strut brace, or strut tower brace (STB) is used in conjunction with MacPherson struts on a monocoque or unibody chassis to provide extra stiffness between the strut towers.
With a MacPherson strut suspension system (where the spring and shock absorber are combined in the one suspension unit), the entire vertical suspension load is transmitted to the top of the vehicle's strut tower. In general terms, a strut tower in a monocoque chassis is a reinforced portion of the inner wheel well and is not necessarily directly connected to the main chassis rails. For this reason there is inherent flex within the strut towers relative to the chassis rails.
A strut bar is designed to reduce this strut tower flex by tying two parallel strut towers together. This transmits the load of each strut tower during cornering which ties the two towers together and reduces chassis flex. To accomplish this effectively (especially on MacPherson strut suspensions), the bar must be rigid throughout its length."

These are usually easy installs as on most cars the top of the front suspension is easily accessible. The main issue can be clearance over the engine ie on most cars there is an engine between the front suspension towers which the bar needs to clear yet allow the bonnet to close. Of course this is not an issue with a 911 so there is no excuse for clearance issue in the design of a strut brace for the car.

So installation is simply a matter of removing the relevant top suspension nuts to allow fitment of the bar, lining it up and cutting the boot carpet to allow it to be refitted. nb this can be done without affecting the suspension at all ie no need to do anything when removing / replacing the suspension tower nuts.

Boot carpet pulled back (nb you don't need to remove it completely but just enough to get access to the top of the strut tower)

This shows the 4 retaining nuts for the top of the strut tower on each side of the car.




The two foremost nuts should be removed......



nb. its worth noting that various designs of strut brace will have differing mounting brackets and ways to adjust fitment but the principles will be the same Wink

It is not unusual for there to be some contours around the strut tower which the base of the strut bar mounting plates need to accommodate. In the case of the 993 there is a slightly raised edge to the strut tower hole.




You can see that this makes the mounting bracket base slightly wobbly when put in place (you can see a gap here on the LHD of the mounting plate)

nb remove the brace itself from the mounting brackets if possible to make fitment easier.




Don't worry about this as I found when I replaced the suspension nuts and tightened them back up that the base plate fitted snugly in place.

The strut brace mounting bracket is angled so you need to ensure you fit the correct LHS and RHS (they are not marked up). Its obvious when you do it which way is correct.




Put the mounting brackets in place and tighten the securing nuts previously removed back up.

You can see here that once tight the bracket is a very snug and tight fit....




It was then simply a matter of pulling the boot carpet back over and creating a slit with a stanley knife to allow the top of the mounting bracket to be pushed through it. I mad the slit small at first and gradually increased it until the brace securing hole at the top was visible.

The brace if then fitted to one bracket and its length adjusted to line up the securing hole on the other bracket. OCD dictates that the adjustment should be even on both sides Rolling Eyes

Once both sides of the brace are secured to the mounting brackets the job is done Very Happy






I'm not sure what difference this will make to the handling yet (theory is all well and good but I know from experience some cars benefit from braces more than other eg softops which are more prone to chassis flex). The fact that the 993 RS's have these fitted as standard (so far as I know) means that there must be some benefit ? but for road use time will tell.
But it does look cool anyway Smile
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berni29
Watkins Glen


Joined: 24 Oct 2009
Posts: 2196
Location: Kent


PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 11:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi

There is a discussion about whether the bar should be in slight compression or tension. Most people including myself would fit the strut with the front wheels off the ground and very slightly compressed from what I have read. Then with the wheels on the ground the brace will be exerting a pressure on the towers, ie pushing them outwards.

Doing this is high on the list for my car, but I like the RUF type which require longer studs I think.

One last thing, there is a price to pay with these things if you have an accident at the front. The brace can make things worse (damage greater) by affecting the other tower due to them now being linked (if you are unlucky with the angles)

By the way, does anyone know where I can get a RUF strut at a reasonable price?

Lovely write up again!

Berni
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993 C2 Tip 1994 187k miles. Black and Grey. M029 & Bilstein HD's, Elephant Racing RS bushes F&R, RS mounts, strengthened engine carrier, 100 cell cat inserts, HID's. Solid steering arms mod, top of the engine rebuilt, mapped by Wayne, suspension set up by Chris.
 
  
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6382
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 12:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Berni,

I have not seen the recent discussion on here but have heard the debates over fitting techniques and benefits / downsides before but you are correct in pointing them out.

I don't fit them with any load by raising the wheels for fitment but ensure they are fully braced in the normal rest position ie wheels on the floor.

I am working on the basis that my new suspension setup has settled now but will check the strut tension through this year.

It is also worth noting that fitting a strut brace which is not a factory standard fitment should be disclosed to your insurance company Cop
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berni29
Watkins Glen


Joined: 24 Oct 2009
Posts: 2196
Location: Kent


PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2013 2:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi

Yes I agree it is best to tell the insurance company. I seem to remember a thread on here when Dom did a group buy of the RUF or a Perfect Power copy a while back from memory. There is also the Fabspeed EVO Front Strut Bar which i like the look of. Both freely available in the US of course but not in the UK from the looks of it.

Berni
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993 C2 Tip 1994 187k miles. Black and Grey. M029 & Bilstein HD's, Elephant Racing RS bushes F&R, RS mounts, strengthened engine carrier, 100 cell cat inserts, HID's. Solid steering arms mod, top of the engine rebuilt, mapped by Wayne, suspension set up by Chris.
 
  
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6382
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 4:55 pm    Post subject: Re: Stainless Steel Kick Plates Reply with quote

jonttt wrote:
I was interested in sourcing a set of stainless steel kickplates which where an OEM option.

It appears that these are now only available with certain lettering (eg RS) and where pretty expensive.

It therefore appealed to me when a UK supplier was identified on Rennlist who was offering OEM alternatives including a new version with "Carrera 4S" lettering.

As I'm UK based I "volunteered" to be the guinea pig and try them out. The supplier is Type911.

They offer a few options but I wanted to try the new chrome inlay style with Carrera 4S lettering.......

"Stainless Steel Sill Trims
Laser cut polished stainless steel inserts in brushed stainless sills, great quality, self adhesive, fits 911, 964 & 993, choose from "911", "993", "Carrera", "Carrera S", "Carrera 4S", "turbo", "2S" or "4S" script. Price is for a pair"

The price including tax and shipping in the UK was c£128 (I think roughly 50% of the OEM price).

It took about 3 weeks for delivery but I think these are made to order at the moment as a new product.

They where delivered very well packaged to protect them.

First impressions are very good but on closer inspection there are a couple of issues. So the good and the bad.....

Good bits ....

- the stainless steel is very good quality with a good weight to them and they give the feeling of being very robust ie they will not easily bend / mishape.

- the appearance from a normal viewing distance is very good...



- they have full laser cut lettering with chrome inlay which is held in place by the provided taped fixing backing strip. These would easily lend themselves to various inlay options if required.

but the bad bits....

- on close inspection there is some room for improvement in the chrome inlay finish which is randomly raised in some areas and an inconsistent fit in terms of tolerance to the laser cut steel. This appears to be down to the actual type of inlay used reacting to the cutting process.





EDIT: just to clarify on the above pic that I expect the inset to sit flatter when fitted as it is only held in place by the sticky backing tape currently. The issue I am trying to highlight is the reaction of the insert chrome edge to the cutting process which is not perfect.

So I was left with a dilemma, do I reject them (I don't need to argue quality as these would simply fall under European distance selling rules giving me 7 days to return them for a refund) or keep them. I have decided to keep them on the following reasoning:

- the quality of the steel and laser cutting is very good and in line with what I would perceive to be OEM quality (I cannot comment in fit yet)

- I like the "3D" effect of the chrome inlay compared to normal (ie cheaper) etching.

- the appearance from normal viewing height is fine and its only my OCDness that has an issue with the fine detail finish.

- if the inlay finish / fit deteriorates with use them the quality of the basic laser cut steel will lend itself to some nice alternative finishes ie the inlay is simply held in place via the taped backing so can be easily changed with the steel acting as a natural template.

- price I perceive as reasonable for the laser cutting and quality of steel used. nb If they had been twice the price they would have been going back.

At the end of the day I like them

Fitting should be a relatively easy process requiring the simple removal of the existing kick plates which are glued in place (time will be mostly removing old glue) and sticking these down with the backing tape already in place.

These will also meet my requirement to be fully reversible to OEM if required.

I will point the supplier to this post as I believe in customer feedback.

ps here are some OEM pictures for comparison...and why I prefer the laser cut finish......







In between children's birthday parties and summer fetes I managed to find a couple of hours to have a go at fitting the stainless steel sill plates.

This is one of those jobs were you could do it in 20 minutes (both sides) or to meet OCD standards spend 2 hours on 1 side Surprised . Yep I spend 2 hours fitting the passenger side Rolling Eyes

First job was to pull away the door rubber. You only need to do this for the bottom section. It can retain itself but also has some sticky stuff behind but it pulls away (and goes back later) easily enough.

nb I have seen some cars with the bottom of these rubbers very worn with use (ie constant rubbing from entering / exiting the car) so if yours are in bad shape be careful as I think they would be pretty easy to rip if worn.




Note the brown gooey stuff near the rubber is the glue used with it.

The black plastic sill trim is held in place with 2 strips of sticky tape. This is very well stuck in and its a much easier job to lift the trim and not damage the paintwork with a proper trim removal tool. You can buy kits of various trim tools on eBay and its worth paying a bit extra for a good set. The tools tend to be stronger and the plastic they are made of just right to be useful yet not cause damage. With a proper trim tool you can apply enough leverage to force the trim free from the tape without fear of damaging the paint. The plastic trim is also flexible enough to bend away.

The hard bit is starting it off ie getting the trim tool underneath and then its simply a matter of working it along levering as you go.




Once the trim is removed you are left with remnants of the securing tape and 16 years of dirt.




There is a sill access plate which is now revealed. This was the only area which showed any signs of rust so I removed it for rectification.




I could feel with my finger through the hole and it was obvious that this was only surface rust so I sanded down and applied a rust treatment.






If there is one job I hate it is removing stubborn sticky residue. Now I could have just pulled off the easy bits and stuck the new trim in place but that may not have given an even fit and I like shiny Smile

yuk.....




So 1.5 hours of careful solvent use and rubbing to dissolve the glue (interrupted by the odd beer and a sandwich).....



ps the access plate has had a coat of primer and paint once the rust treatment had cured. There is a small amount of glue residue left as I ran out of solvent Embarassed

I treated the access hole cover plate and refitted this but I used a small bead of blue tack to secure in place. Partly to keep metal off metal and not really to stick it down as the new sill trim tape will do that.

So finally the easy bit which was fitting the new trim. This is simply a matter of removing the backing tape to stick in place. There is no real lining up to do as its that good a fit it just fits straight where it should.

I'm really pleased I did not send it back. I think it goes really well with arctic silver and blends in better than the original black plastic trim. The stainless steel is very high quality and looks it when fitted. To people who do not know better it looks like a piece of factory trim which is what I wanted. Obviously its easily reversible to OEM if needed.





and for easy comparison the drivers side OEM trim...






The drivers side will have to wait for another day, the sun is shining and 2 hours on this is enough for one day Wink
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Ex 2014 Porsche Boxster GTS My Journal
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berni29
Watkins Glen


Joined: 24 Oct 2009
Posts: 2196
Location: Kent


PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2013 1:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi

Thank you very much for taking the time to document this job. I never knew that there is an access plate under the sill trim. I will be straight in there with my new inspection borescope and rustproofing fluid next week. Excellent!

I will do a post on what I find.

Berni
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993 C2 Tip 1994 187k miles. Black and Grey. M029 & Bilstein HD's, Elephant Racing RS bushes F&R, RS mounts, strengthened engine carrier, 100 cell cat inserts, HID's. Solid steering arms mod, top of the engine rebuilt, mapped by Wayne, suspension set up by Chris.
 
  
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6382
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2013 10:15 am    Post subject: Carbon Fibre Handbrake and RS storage Trays Reply with quote

Carbon Fibre Handbrake and RS Storage Trays fitment

Well I can't fault EurocupGT (aka Porscheshop) for their customer service. One phone call to inform them the order was incorrect ie part missing and a defective finish and they have send me both the missing part and a replacement for the other by return post no quibbles Thumb

These really are genuine high quality carbon fibre parts which fit perfectly......










Finished install pics not the best as underground car park using flash so I will take some more when in daylight another day....




mmmmmm I'm so tempted now to order a new OEM carbon fibre handbrake.......... can I wait to see if one ever comes up on ebay Dont know
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1997 Porsche 911 993 C4S My Journal
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6382
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2013 3:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have added an index to the first post in this journal linking to various topics throughout the journal for ease of reference (ie click on lin ks in first post of this thread).

Guess I've been busy these last few months given this list does not include jobs I've had others do for me such as new dampers and springs, full geometry setup, Billet lower cam covers, new front brake shields, all exhaust heat shields replaced, stainless steel brake hoses, ...... I'm sure there is more Dont know

Here is the list added to the first post as it stands today Surprised


Initial Interior Clean & Wiper Widget Install

Side & front indicator lens change; DME relay preventative change

Tor-B Diagnostic Cable

Becker Cascade Headunit Install

Leather Gear Gaitor Replacement

PA1000 Alarm Board Replacement

Door End Cap & Pedal Cover replacements

Tor-Light HID Install

365mm Raid Steering Wheel Install (smaller and thicker than OEM)

RSR Muffler and Big Oval Exhaust Tips Install

Motorsound Airbox Install

Spoiler protection caps, drainage plug and key lock plug installs

Aluminiun Bezel Rings Install

Light Switch Bulb Replacement

Turbo S Front Duct and LED Light Install

Battery Isolator fitment

LEd Rear Number Plate Bulb Replacement

OEM Overmat and retinaer Install

MPL Slave Clutch Cylinder

Tequipment Carbon / Alloy Gear Stick Replacement

RS Storage Tray, Front Protection Bar and Drinks Holder

Front Bonnet Badge - Part 1
Front Bonnet Badge Install - Part 2

Tyre Pressure Monitoring System Install (TPMS) - Work in Progress

Hand Brake Lever Replacement

Engine Air Filter and Pollen Filter Replacement

Front Strut Brace Install

Stainless Steel Sill Trim Install

Carbon Fibre Handbrake & RS Storage Trays Install
_________________
1997 Porsche 911 993 C4S My Journal
2011 Porsche 987.2 Boxster Black Edition My Journal
Ex 2014 Porsche Boxster GTS My Journal
2017 BMW 740 Msport
2017 RR Evoque Autobiography
 
  
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6382
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2013 7:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interior Shots:

The interior of the car is more or less as I want it now.

before:




after:


_________________
1997 Porsche 911 993 C4S My Journal
2011 Porsche 987.2 Boxster Black Edition My Journal
Ex 2014 Porsche Boxster GTS My Journal
2017 BMW 740 Msport
2017 RR Evoque Autobiography
 
  
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6382
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2013 7:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another eBay bargain........ picked up a brand new fitted indoor car cover for c50% of the normal price Very Happy

All tucked up.......


_________________
1997 Porsche 911 993 C4S My Journal
2011 Porsche 987.2 Boxster Black Edition My Journal
Ex 2014 Porsche Boxster GTS My Journal
2017 BMW 740 Msport
2017 RR Evoque Autobiography
 
  
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6382
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Thu Jul 25, 2013 10:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Update on Warranty work:

I've had an ongoing issue with the air con not working on the car. This has been fully covered by Strasse's "in house" warranty ie they cover all costs themselves.

Initially the evaporator was replaced and was found to be damaged (not corroded) but the system still would not hold refrigerant for more than a few days.

Further investigation has now resulted in a new condensor also being fitted.

It has been regassed today and the plan is I'll pick it up on Monday if it hold the refrigerant over the weekend.

Strasse have been really good over this and not tried to wriggle out of anything in any way ie their warranty has done what it said on the tin and you can't ask for more than that Thumb

So I'm a happy camper and off to Silverstone this weekend (Fri & Sat) as part of the BMW club but will probably spend longer oggling 993's Surprised

nb I will be checking for working headlight switch bulbs Grin

ps just had an unexpected windfall so with money burning a hole in my pocket I am desperately trying to avoid paying c£500 for a carbon handbrake lever what PC
_________________
1997 Porsche 911 993 C4S My Journal
2011 Porsche 987.2 Boxster Black Edition My Journal
Ex 2014 Porsche Boxster GTS My Journal
2017 BMW 740 Msport
2017 RR Evoque Autobiography
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
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