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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6379
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2013 3:05 pm    Post subject: New Badges Reply with quote

I've been deliberating over this one for a couple of weeks........ do I or don't I replace the front bonnet badge.

Whilst I understand the argument for not unless damage ie retain the original aged effect ultimately I decided that the gasket was looking untidy and that if I was going to replace that which I knew OCD would require then I might as well replace the badge as well.

I set myself just one criteria, I had to have an original OEM 993 badge and not a 996 badge Surprised Hand

So I duly sourced and ordered a "new old stock" 993 bonnet badge, gasket and retaining nuts.





and with suitable trim tools for removal




I ordered the retaining nuts as they are cheap and I'm not sure how reuseable the original ones will be.

One thing is obvious though.... the gasket is a tight / impossible fit. So I will either be glueing it to the back of the badge prior to fitment as it will need some retention assistance I think or I am considering not using it and simply trimming the old gasket when it is removed to give a cleaner fitment ie remove the black raised border of the gasket.

Whilst I was ordering this I decided to also change the "soft" 3d effect badge on my steering wheel with a proper metal item. I've heard all the arguments before about not fixing metal badges to airbags but the airbag would deploy on a hinge (?) and so it should not be an issue in terms of flying off and hitting me in the face in the event of activation. Thats my logic anyway unless anyone can prove otherwise.

If you do see someone with a slightly crumpled 993 and Porsche crest impression on their forehead though, that may be me Very Happy

I went for a 356 badge as being the right size....




but I needed to Dremel the rear pin off....






and affix some suitable sticky tape.....






all ready for fitment....




and finally I am not usually one for sticking extra badges everywhere but seeing as my first Porsche ownership experience just happens to be in the 911's 50th anniversary year it would be a shame not to fix a suitable commemorative badge for this year only (in a Porsche OEM commemorative way of course)......




I'll see how it looks on the car and decide whether to keep it on or not.


Now that I have some jobs to do fixing this lot on I just have to remember where I left the car Dont know Question
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Julian Weston
Trainee


Joined: 18 Nov 2003
Posts: 97
Location: London


PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2013 8:09 pm    Post subject: Badge Reply with quote

Hi Jon,

I had the same issue with the new badge rubber, putting it is very hot water helped but I still needed a friend to sold it down whilst I bolted it on. I like the rear badge, where did you get it?
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6379
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2013 9:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been told the problem with the bonnet badge backing gaskets is they are not genuine porsche items and the genuine ones fit a lot better.

I'm probably going to get one from porsche and compare.

The anniversary badges are from the link below. They are great quality, very reasonably priced and very quick delivery.

They also do a different version sticker

http://www.isaydingdong.co.uk/ourshop/prod_2700718-Porsche-911-at-50-Laser-Cut-Self-Adhesive-Car-Badge-65.html
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dommorton
Zolder


Joined: 16 Mar 2008
Posts: 5062


1998 Porsche 993 Carrera 4S

PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2013 7:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good work on the correct 993 badge.

I replaced the one on mine too as someone fitted a 997 part when the car was repainted nooo

Look at the difference here. The 997 one is pretty poor in comparison.

http://www.911uk.com/viewtopic.php?t=82955
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6379
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2013 8:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yep I have an original NOS 993 badge. The weight and quality of enamel is impressive.

I'm, going to delay fitting it though until I source a genuine gasket for it.
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6379
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2013 8:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I fitted the celebration and steering wheel badges today.......

I was unsure of the best location for the celebration badge. Immediately above / below the Carrera 4S badge looked too fussy so ended up fitting it higher up.

First impressions are I have mixed feelings but I think its growing on me. Bear in mind this is a bit of fun for this year to celebrate the 911's 50th Anniversary and so I think I'm edging to leaving it on. Just not sure its the best location for it ?

What do you think / suggestions ?








I also fitted the steering wheel badge. Sorry the pics are a bit dark in my underground garage Embarassed

Soft 3d effect one fitted on installation of the wheel.....




New metal one......


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dommorton
Zolder


Joined: 16 Mar 2008
Posts: 5062


1998 Porsche 993 Carrera 4S

PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2013 9:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Incorrect non black Porsche script on the wheel badge though Grin

Think I preferred the smaller one? Dont know

911 50 badge is a bit odd there. I'd have it with the other badges if it is to stay.

Those gaskets are a swine. Even genuine are a pig to fit and have to be stretched in to place.
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cambjones
Barcelona


Joined: 20 Apr 2010
Posts: 1405


1997 Porsche 993 Carrera 4

PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2013 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

dommorton wrote:


911 50 badge is a bit odd there. I'd have it with the other badges if it is to stay.
.


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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6379
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2013 10:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

dommorton wrote:
Incorrect non black Porsche script on the wheel badge though Grin



Hand

Its an early pre '65 badge ie small one Very Happy


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dommorton
Zolder


Joined: 16 Mar 2008
Posts: 5062


1998 Porsche 993 Carrera 4S

PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2013 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Exactly. So incorrect for a 97 car Rolling Eyes
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6379
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2013 12:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah but the later bonnet badges are too big for a steering wheel so I purposely went for the early badge which is a lot smaller Wink
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mohitos
Barcelona


Joined: 10 Jul 2012
Posts: 1420
Location: London


PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2013 1:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think I'd stick it on the bottom of the rear screen, where it can do no harm.
 
  
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6379
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2013 1:16 pm    Post subject: Re: TPMS Preparation Reply with quote

jonttt wrote:
TPMS

Stage 1 - Sourcing and Tyre valve stem preparation


Tyre Pressure Monitoring System (or TPMS) is a technology that is becoming more and more common place.

Back in the late late 80's early 90's it was a new technology. In fact the Porsche 959 was the first passenger car fitted with a TPMS system.

Early basic systems saw some luxury cars fitted with a system that measured the rotational speed of a wheel and could detect a tyre that was losing pressure from a reduction in overall diameter and subsequent affect on rotational speed (ie a smaller diameter wheel has to rotate faster to to achieve the same linear speed). This basic system is known as iTPMS (i for indirect as it uses the ABS wheel speed sensor fitted outside of the wheel itself so cannot provide actual pressure readings) For example my 2001 BMW Z3m has such a system fitted but it was only during the last year or so of production of Z3's that the system was fitted.

The technology has moved a long way and now many cars are fitted with systems that can accurately measure and display both tyre pressure and temperature whilst providing warnings to drivers beyond predefined boundaries. So far as I know TPMS will be mandatory on all new passenger cars in the near future.

I learned a long time ago the benefits of correctly set tyre pressure especially on performance cars and not just for the obvious reasons but it can have a massive effect on tyre wear. I once went through 4 sets of front tyres on a Mini Cooper S Works in 20,000 miles only to discover the tyre pressure had been completely wrong all the time !

The end result is that I am now paranoid about correctly set tyre pressures. Given some of my cars are nowhere near daily drivers and I feel as though I am checking tyre pressures manually every time I drive them.

So when I purchased my 993 one of the first projects I set myself was to identify and install a TPMS system.

The industry standard way of fitting a TPMS system (including OEM) is for small lightweight sensor / transmitters to be fitted within the tyre attached to the bottom of the valve stem. There is an alternative method using metal straps which are secured around the alloy (within the tyre). I did not really explore the metal strap option as I wanted to try an OEM style install.

Initial research showed that the first stumbling block I would encounter would be due to the fact that I have Hollow Spoke alloy wheels PC
These use a none standard tyre valve stem which is both longer and thinner than "normal".

As most TPMS kits come with valve stems adapted to secure the TPMS sensors onto then I would need to find either a suitable valve to fit or adapt the Hollow Spoke Stems.

I narrowed the choice of TPMS to the TyreSure (a rebranded Orange) system. This is a few years old now but well proven, they manufacture OEM sensors (not Porsche) and their retrofit kit is offered for sale by Porsche resellers.

The UK retail price for the system is c£170 but I managed to secure an Ebay purchase (via Malta) for <£100 delivered of a new sealed kit.

It is worth noting that the x4 tyre sensors / transmitters have built in batteries which are none replaceable ie you have to replace the whole sensor when the battery goes. They are marketed as having a 7 year operational life but I am always sceptical of such claims as they tend to be maximum in ideal conditions etc... Plus they have no "on/off" switch and I do not know how they "sleep" etc... (edit: I believe they "sense" rotation) so I have taken a chance purchasing what could be old stock with a shorter shelf life. But for my initial trails I was happy with the significant discount.

TPMS system received....




The kit is made up of x1 display unit for inside the car with a USB cigarette socket power lead, x4 sensors / transmitters for attaching to the tyre valve stems, x4 adapted standard tyre valve stems, x4 securing screws.




My car has had the standard 993 4S "solids" upgraded at some point in its life to "Hollow Spokes" but there is no history to show when this happened. I therefore have no ideal how old the current valve stems are. As these special valve stems use rubber seals I decided it would be easier / quicker / safer to buy x4 new valve stems from Porsche...... but they are not cheap so factor in c£40 for a set of 4.




So I set about closer examination of how the kit is supposed to work and how I could get it to fit to the Hollow Spokes.

This is how a kit valve stem fits together....








Essentially it is a standard valve stem with a ball socket at the end. The ball socket has a hole drilled through it (to maintain air flow through the valve) which is tapped to accept a screw. A hollow (to maintain the air way again) screw is then used to secure the sensor / transmitter to the valve stem.


If you compare the kit valve stem to the OEM Hollow Spoke stem you can see that the stem is both too wide to go through the valve hole in the Hollow Spoke alloy and it is not deep enough to sit on the outer and inner edges of the alloy.






I had read on the internet that some people had got around this problem by fitting the ball joint from the kit valve to the OEM valve but this would mean a much longer securing screw would be needed.

I did not see the need for this. Although the OEM valve does not have a ball joint it was basically the correct diameter to fit into the socket on the sensor and allow rotational movement for adjustment when fitting and be secured by the screw. So I thought I would give a direct connection a go by simply drilling and tapping the OEM valve......




There was a big unknowns ie would the OEM valve accept a 4mm wider hole and retain integrity ? Only one way to find out......

Ideally this would be carried out with a bench drill but I don't have one so a vice would have to do......

I started off by drilling a "half way house / pilot hole" using a dremel and 3mm drill (the biggest I had for a dremel).




This went through easily and you realise there is an internal "step" in the hole diameter so the 3mm drill only needs to pass through a few mm.

I then used a standard drill with 4mm bit. Again internet research implied a 10mm hole but I was worried that this would affect the strength of the valve stem so I went with what I thought was enough to allow secure attachment of the screw.






The drilling process went well and I am as happy as I can be that there was no detrimental effect on the strength of the valve stem from the increased diameter hole.

So it was then a striaght forward process of tapping the hole with an M5 x 0.8 thread.....






Once tapped the securing screw (using a T20 torx driver) could be tested to ensure enough thread to secure (and to help clear excess metal swarf)....






It was then a matter of trial fitting and to see if the unit could be put together and secured without the need for a ball socket....... I found that the securing screw actually ended up being too long. Rather than drill the hole deeper and risk weakening the valve I decided to simply pad it with a nut.

Once tightened this worked really well. The unit can be tightened as securely as the original kit valve.....




So it was simply a matter of repeating for the other 3 units....




So that leaves 2 stages to go:

1) fitting of the tyre valves (requires tyre fitter to remove tyre, fit new valves with sensors attached, refit wheels and balance

2) fitting of the display unit inside the car (I will trial via cigarette lighter socket and then hard wire in)

I'm off on holiday for a while though and my car is still having some jobs done on it so those stages will need to wait a few weeks............

ps I have no idea how easy it is to fit the kit valves to none Hollow Spoke 993 Alloys (eg Cup II's or solid spoke turbo twists). If they fit then obviously none of the above adapation of OEM valve stems is needed Wink



OK time for an update on the TPMS install........

I've had the sensors fitted by my local underground tyre fitter on the "dock road". You know when you are in a salubrious place when the large sign on the wall states "Polite Notice to all Customer - NO SPITTING". I joke not Surprised

To be fair the guys where great, both taking car of the wheels including how they jacked the car up and spending some time with me "fine tuning" the sensor fitment.

For reference I paid £40 for fitting the sensors, balancing and a repair to one of the rear tyres which we found a nail through the centre.

The problem we faced on fitment was that as the valves where secured in place ie tightened to the correct torque so that the rubber seals were air tight the sensor did not have enough tolerance to the wheel. In effect the nuts I had used as spacers where very slightly too big and did not allow enough screw thread past the sensor. We solved this by using a combination of washers to allow us to fine tune the sensor securing screw fitment.

Here is one the sensors securely fitted....




So you can fit adapt the hollow spoke valves by simply drilling and threading and then using the standard TPMS kit sensor securing screw. You just need to ensure you have enough suitable washer to fine tune the spacer distance to fit.

So job done Hand Mad

Turned the system on and .............. one sensor not working PC Sad

So a little research, dialogue with the manufacturer (in Tiawan which was fun) etc..... and I have established the following.......

The Orange (Tyresure) system was modified (read improved) sometime in 2012. Prior to this date the sensors worked as follows (bear in mind these are sealed units so once the battery is fitted in manufacture there is no off button) -

- ambient air pressure = sleep mode (ie very little power useage but some)

- tyre pressure (ie when fitted) the sensor permanently sends a signal every 30 seconds even when the car is parked up.


The change to the system in 2012 was to use a more intelligent "G series" sensor which work as follows......

- ambient air pressure = sleep mode (ie very little power useage but some)

- for 24 hour after installation = transmit every 30 seconds

- car speed under 30km/hr Then transmits 3 times every 10 minutes

- car speed over 30km/hr transmit every 20 seconds

- fault detected transmits every 30 seconds even when parked


Here is the crunch = the newer G series intelligent sensors are not backward compatible and cannot be connected to the older display units PC

So armed with this information I am assuming as I bought mine "cheap" off eBay it is probably old stock using the older sensors. If this is the case then although in sleep mode is as per the new sensors it will be older and hence one of the sensors has probably run out of power.

I will therefore need to order a new sensor but the old type. I can get these for c £35 delivered from Tiawan but am waiting for the UK distributor to quote me happy Very Happy or not Judge It will then cost me £10 to get it fitted which should be a 5 min job as the adapted valve is already fitted.

This leaves the dilema of the other valves ie how long will the batteries last in those if one has gone Question

I have decided just to replace the faulty / dead battery one. Hopefully this will allow me enough time to test the system and see how much I like it. First impressions (albeit with 3 tyre readings) are excellent. If I get a real benefit from the system then I will probably stump up for a full newer system using the G series sensors which I can get for c£110 from Tiawan. Those will suit my needs better as my car will spend long spells not being driven so battery life should be much longer.

I now just have to work on fitting the display in the car and permanent wiring Thumb

More to follow when I finish the job bye
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TMin
Nürburgring


Joined: 23 Feb 2009
Posts: 424
Location: NE London


PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2013 9:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jonttt,

Can you share where u found the NOS 993 badge. Unless that was a one off.

Tim
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6379
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2013 10:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It was from an ebay seller called MBS car parts. They seem to sell ad hoc new old stock parts. They only had one of the badges listed but it may be worth you asking them Dont know

http://stores.ebay.co.uk/MBS-Car-Parts-Porsche-Stock/911-993-/_i.html?_fsub=2907807017
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6379
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 5:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I dicided to try and fit the bonnet badge today using the gasket I had. It was not as hard as I thought it would be and I just retained the gasket in place during fitting with some very thin double sided tape.

The gromet/retaining nut design has obviously changed at some point as the original ones effectively screwed into the rear badge pins but the new ones just had a very soft / sticky rubber which the pin pushes through.

In the end it took all of 2 minutes to change the badge.

You can see on the original badge where the enamel had started to discolour.....






and the new badge fitted....


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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6379
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 6:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm almost there with the interior of the car now. I have been "de Blueing" it and the final piece was to replace the blue handbrake lever.

Now a new standard handbrake is c£290 Surprised so once again I was on the eBay bargain trail and chuffed to bits when I sourced a perfect black item for <£100 delivered Smile

It is second hand but as new and even still had the metal attaching rod which you usually need to transfer over from your old handbrake lever.




So on with the install............

This is a very easy DIY and just a little fiddly lining up holes etc.... when refitting.

Firstly remove the rear storage tray / cassette holder in the normal way. This then reveals two securing screws for the handbrake undertray. The 3rd retaining screw is under the handbrake itself but is pretty easy to get at.




Look how much crap is in the screw indent Surprised




You can then slide the base cover over the handbrake lever (helps if handbrake raised and gear stick in 1st to give more room)




I found the obligatory coin under there Rolling Eyes




Now to get the old handbrake out.......

You have to remove a retaining clip (just use a flat head screwdriver to lever out as you pull it up)






once the retaining clip is removed you can knock through the main retaining bolt






Then it is simply a matter of removing the two adjusting bolts from the rear of the mechanism (nb the back one acts as a lock nut for the first so unscrew that first to give the other room to unscrew).....








As the nuts get towards the end of the rod they are attached to you can start to pull the handbrake lever forward to allow room for the nuts to be unscrewed off.......




Then I noticed my car had made another 1p. Who says widebodies don't make money Hand




anyway both nuts removed....




You can now pull the handbrake lever fully free.....




At this point you will get a big piece of metal fall out and you will panic "what have I broken" Embarassed
Don't worry it the ratchet mechanism which is easy to put back into the new handbrake lever for refitting.

The original handbrake lever with a 964 part number...




If your fitting a brand new handbrake lever you would now have to swap over the metal rod to the new one but my second hand one already had this fitted so saved me a job.

Refitting the new lever is a simply reversal of removal but first you need to get the ratchet back in place in the lever. There are only two ways it can go and the right way is so the teeth mesh with the handbrake correctly and the small retaining indent is visible at the bottom. This indent slides under the metal bar below the handbrake which you have probably not noticed is there yet......








Here you can see how the indent go under the metal bar on the car to secure the ratchet mechanism in place during refitting.....




So now its simply a matter of pushing the metal rod back in place just enough to place the two nuts back onto the thread.

Then push the handbrake so the main retaining bolt can be pushed back through whilst at the same time ensuring the ratchet indent is under the metal bar (its easier than it sounds). Once the main securing bolt is through the lever you can put its retaining clip back in place.

Now simply do the rear adjusting nut up to you get 4 to 5 ratchet clicks to fully engage the handbrake. Once its right then do up the rear locking nut to fix it in place.

Put back the under tray (reversal of removal) and the job is done.

The finished install........




I'm really pleased with how this has all come together. I remember sitting in the car when I was deciding whether to purchase or not and telling myself to see past the sea of blue. Its now as I imagined it and probably my perfect spec inside ie full leather and two tone dark blue / black Very Happy
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6379
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 6:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I managed to fit in a 2 hour blast in the glorious sunshine today. Stayed off the local coast roads (full of tourists) and stuck to my favourite B roads.

The car is really beginning to feel like mine now, I just love it. They really are just such a solid feeling car on the road and boy do they get some looks from passer by Smile

One things has become clear, I looooooove the MPL clutch slave cylinder. Now that I'm used to it it really has transformed the drive of the car for the better making it a much easier and even more pleasurable driving experience.

I am still smiling an hour later thinking of that glorious engine noise on full chatter mid overtake with full height brambles roadside wrapping the sound around the car...... fantastic
ps thats something I just could never do in the F430, widebody or not these cars just feel so nimble on the narrow B roads. The Ferrari's feel massive in comparison.
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dommorton
Zolder


Joined: 16 Mar 2008
Posts: 5062


1998 Porsche 993 Carrera 4S

PostPosted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 7:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a very good point. Even in widebody form, these cars are actually pretty small compared to most of today's offerings.
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6379
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 9:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some of the overtakes I did today I would not have attempted in a larger car !
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