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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6370
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Fri Jun 14, 2013 5:35 pm    Post subject: MPL Clutch Slave Cylinder Reply with quote

I have been trying to source an upgraded MPL Slave Clutch Cylinder since buying my 993 after reading several rave reviews and comments from my Indy....... but speaking to MPL they had none left in stock and where awaiting a new batch to be manufactured.

Sure enough a couple of weeks ago they appeared on eBay with a BuyItNow price of £179.

I had read that they previously also put some up for auction starting at 99p.

Sure enough a few days later 2 went on auction (one on German Ebay and one UK) but on a 9 day auction.

This left me a dilemma as my car was due in for some warranty work in 7 days. So I could either buy at £179 and get it fitted straight away or take a chance on getting cheaper but I would have to wait to get it fitted.

I decided to take a chance and wait for the auction. In the end the german one went for c£125 but I got the UK one for <£100 delivered Thumb

I received delivery today (too late for the current work being done on the car as expected Rolling Eyes ) so will have to wait to get fitted.

It does seem to be a quality piece of engineering with clear instructions confirming which parts need to be "rescued" from the OEM unit.












and the MPL brochure explaining its advantages over the OEM part:


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Kimbo
Paul Ricard


Joined: 05 May 2011
Posts: 3480
Location: East Sussex


PostPosted: Fri Jun 14, 2013 6:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Numbercruncher wrote:
You'll be wanting your own mod soon Jon ala Mr Hollamby Very Happy


It's possible. Lots of patent applications, many years of waiting, but worth it in the end, if only for the fame, but the money's nice too.

Kim Hollamby also highly recommends the MPL Slave Cylinder and it's unfortunate he didn't come up with the idea, and ended up paying £180 from Germany for his own one.

Good thread. How many hours are there in your day, where you come from?
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6370
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Fri Jun 14, 2013 7:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lol, Its just say I lead a varied life Wink

Today was not untypical, completed the purchase of a warehouse, spent 2 hours on the phone in a tesco car park on a conference call (handy for paying the trolley guy to grab me a sandwich, I know all the tricks) but I missed the office fish and chip lunch day, finalised a new advertising campaign (did well 10 minutes left to deadline), finished work early to be met by boxes of 993 goodies and daughter being sick on freshly washed quilt. Currently sat in casino waiting for Friday night poker tournament to start so could be a late one and I have dance at 10am tomorrow (for my daughter). Yep the 993 keeps me busy lol

Ps I also had chance to play around with a tpms system I've just sourced for the 993 but it needs some fettling first so more on that another day Wink
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jonttt
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 17, 2013 2:16 pm    Post subject: TPMS Preparation Reply with quote

TPMS

Stage 1 - Sourcing and Tyre valve stem preparation


Tyre Pressure Monitoring System (or TPMS) is a technology that is becoming more and more common place.

Back in the late late 80's early 90's it was a new technology. In fact the Porsche 959 was the first passenger car fitted with a TPMS system.

Early basic systems saw some luxury cars fitted with a system that measured the rotational speed of a wheel and could detect a tyre that was losing pressure from a reduction in overall diameter and subsequent affect on rotational speed (ie a smaller diameter wheel has to rotate faster to to achieve the same linear speed). This basic system is known as iTPMS (i for indirect as it uses the ABS wheel speed sensor fitted outside of the wheel itself so cannot provide actual pressure readings) For example my 2001 BMW Z3m has such a system fitted but it was only during the last year or so of production of Z3's that the system was fitted.

The technology has moved a long way and now many cars are fitted with systems that can accurately measure and display both tyre pressure and temperature whilst providing warnings to drivers beyond predefined boundaries. So far as I know TPMS will be mandatory on all new passenger cars in the near future.

I learned a long time ago the benefits of correctly set tyre pressure especially on performance cars and not just for the obvious reasons but it can have a massive effect on tyre wear. I once went through 4 sets of front tyres on a Mini Cooper S Works in 20,000 miles only to discover the tyre pressure had been completely wrong all the time !

The end result is that I am now paranoid about correctly set tyre pressures. Given some of my cars are nowhere near daily drivers and I feel as though I am checking tyre pressures manually every time I drive them.

So when I purchased my 993 one of the first projects I set myself was to identify and install a TPMS system.

The industry standard way of fitting a TPMS system (including OEM) is for small lightweight sensor / transmitters to be fitted within the tyre attached to the bottom of the valve stem. There is an alternative method using metal straps which are secured around the alloy (within the tyre). I did not really explore the metal strap option as I wanted to try an OEM style install.

Initial research showed that the first stumbling block I would encounter would be due to the fact that I have Hollow Spoke alloy wheels PC
These use a none standard tyre valve stem which is both longer and thinner than "normal".

As most TPMS kits come with valve stems adapted to secure the TPMS sensors onto then I would need to find either a suitable valve to fit or adapt the Hollow Spoke Stems.

I narrowed the choice of TPMS to the TyreSure (a rebranded Orange) system. This is a few years old now but well proven, they manufacture OEM sensors (not Porsche) and their retrofit kit is offered for sale by Porsche resellers.

The UK retail price for the system is c£170 but I managed to secure an Ebay purchase (via Malta) for <£100 delivered of a new sealed kit.

It is worth noting that the x4 tyre sensors / transmitters have built in batteries which are none replaceable ie you have to replace the whole sensor when the battery goes. They are marketed as having a 7 year operational life but I am always sceptical of such claims as they tend to be maximum in ideal conditions etc... Plus they have no "on/off" switch and I do not know how they "sleep" etc... (edit: I believe they "sense" rotation) so I have taken a chance purchasing what could be old stock with a shorter shelf life. But for my initial trails I was happy with the significant discount.

TPMS system received....




The kit is made up of x1 display unit for inside the car with a USB cigarette socket power lead, x4 sensors / transmitters for attaching to the tyre valve stems, x4 adapted standard tyre valve stems, x4 securing screws.




My car has had the standard 993 4S "solids" upgraded at some point in its life to "Hollow Spokes" but there is no history to show when this happened. I therefore have no ideal how old the current valve stems are. As these special valve stems use rubber seals I decided it would be easier / quicker / safer to buy x4 new valve stems from Porsche...... but they are not cheap so factor in c£40 for a set of 4.




So I set about closer examination of how the kit is supposed to work and how I could get it to fit to the Hollow Spokes.

This is how a kit valve stem fits together....








Essentially it is a standard valve stem with a ball socket at the end. The ball socket has a hole drilled through it (to maintain air flow through the valve) which is tapped to accept a screw. A hollow (to maintain the air way again) screw is then used to secure the sensor / transmitter to the valve stem.


If you compare the kit valve stem to the OEM Hollow Spoke stem you can see that the stem is both too wide to go through the valve hole in the Hollow Spoke alloy and it is not deep enough to sit on the outer and inner edges of the alloy.






I had read on the internet that some people had got around this problem by fitting the ball joint from the kit valve to the OEM valve but this would mean a much longer securing screw would be needed.

I did not see the need for this. Although the OEM valve does not have a ball joint it was basically the correct diameter to fit into the socket on the sensor and allow rotational movement for adjustment when fitting and be secured by the screw. So I thought I would give a direct connection a go by simply drilling and tapping the OEM valve......




There was a big unknowns ie would the OEM valve accept a 4mm wider hole and retain integrity ? Only one way to find out......

Ideally this would be carried out with a bench drill but I don't have one so a vice would have to do......

I started off by drilling a "half way house / pilot hole" using a dremel and 3mm drill (the biggest I had for a dremel).




This went through easily and you realise there is an internal "step" in the hole diameter so the 3mm drill only needs to pass through a few mm.

I then used a standard drill with 4mm bit. Again internet research implied a 10mm hole but I was worried that this would affect the strength of the valve stem so I went with what I thought was enough to allow secure attachment of the screw.






The drilling process went well and I am as happy as I can be that there was no detrimental effect on the strength of the valve stem from the increased diameter hole.

So it was then a striaght forward process of tapping the hole with an M5 x 0.8 thread.....






Once tapped the securing screw (using a T20 torx driver) could be tested to ensure enough thread to secure (and to help clear excess metal swarf)....






It was then a matter of trial fitting and to see if the unit could be put together and secured without the need for a ball socket....... I found that the securing screw actually ended up being too long. Rather than drill the hole deeper and risk weakening the valve I decided to simply pad it with a nut.

Once tightened this worked really well. The unit can be tightened as securely as the original kit valve.....




So it was simply a matter of repeating for the other 3 units....




So that leaves 2 stages to go:

1) fitting of the tyre valves (requires tyre fitter to remove tyre, fit new valves with sensors attached, refit wheels and balance

2) fitting of the display unit inside the car (I will trial via cigarette lighter socket and then hard wire in)

I'm off on holiday for a while though and my car is still having some jobs done on it so those stages will need to wait a few weeks............

ps I have no idea how easy it is to fit the kit valves to none Hollow Spoke 993 Alloys (eg Cup II's or solid spoke turbo twists). If they fit then obviously none of the above adapation of OEM valve stems is needed Wink
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Last edited by jonttt on Mon Jun 17, 2013 9:43 pm; edited 3 times in total
 
  
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Zingari
Brands Hatch
Brands Hatch


Joined: 25 Oct 2009
Posts: 13023
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1993 Porsche 964 Anniversary

PostPosted: Mon Jun 17, 2013 3:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jon - Great work Thumb But what will the Mrs say about clamping the vice to the kitchen table Hand
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6370
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Mon Jun 17, 2013 3:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lol she was not happy.....

the story went

"how long will fathers day lunch be ?"

"10-15 minutes"

"OK I've just got a quick job to do"

wack

To be fair as it was a nice day I had intended to setup on the outside bench but the vice would not fit. Man logic did not factor in said lunch Dont know

So my Mrs and daughter had fathers day lunch on a kids 2 ft tall table and I was in the naughty corner but at least I did not have to use a straw Thumb

Once finished I quickly rectified the situation with a trip to the beach and large ice creams before settling down to watch the US Open golf all evening thumbsup
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
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Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Fri Jun 28, 2013 12:13 pm    Post subject: Stainless Steel Kick Plates Reply with quote

I was interested in sourcing a set of stainless steel kickplates which where an OEM option.

It appears that these are now only available with certain lettering (eg RS) and where pretty expensive.

It therefore appealed to me when a UK supplier was identified on Rennlist who was offering OEM alternatives including a new version with "Carrera 4S" lettering.

As I'm UK based I "volunteered" to be the guinea pig and try them out. The supplier is Type911.

They offer a few options but I wanted to try the new chrome inlay style with Carrera 4S lettering.......

"Stainless Steel Sill Trims
Laser cut polished stainless steel inserts in brushed stainless sills, great quality, self adhesive, fits 911, 964 & 993, choose from "911", "993", "Carrera", "Carrera S", "Carrera 4S", "turbo", "2S" or "4S" script. Price is for a pair"

The price including tax and shipping in the UK was c£128 (I think roughly 50% of the OEM price).

It took about 3 weeks for delivery but I think these are made to order at the moment as a new product.

They where delivered very well packaged to protect them.

First impressions are very good but on closer inspection there are a couple of issues. So the good and the bad.....

Good bits ....

- the stainless steel is very good quality with a good weight to them and they give the feeling of being very robust ie they will not easily bend / mishape.

- the appearance from a normal viewing distance is very good...



- they have full laser cut lettering with chrome inlay which is held in place by the provided taped fixing backing strip. These would easily lend themselves to various inlay options if required.

but the bad bits....

- on close inspection there is some room for improvement in the chrome inlay finish which is randomly raised in some areas and an inconsistent fit in terms of tolerance to the laser cut steel. This appears to be down to the actual type of inlay used reacting to the cutting process.





EDIT: just to clarify on the above pic that I expect the inset to sit flatter when fitted as it is only held in place by the sticky backing tape currently. The issue I am trying to highlight is the reaction of the insert chrome edge to the cutting process which is not perfect.

So I was left with a dilemma, do I reject them (I don't need to argue quality as these would simply fall under European distance selling rules giving me 7 days to return them for a refund) or keep them. I have decided to keep them on the following reasoning:

- the quality of the steel and laser cutting is very good and in line with what I would perceive to be OEM quality (I cannot comment in fit yet)

- I like the "3D" effect of the chrome inlay compared to normal (ie cheaper) etching.

- the appearance from normal viewing height is fine and its only my OCDness that has an issue with the fine detail finish.

- if the inlay finish / fit deteriorates with use them the quality of the basic laser cut steel will lend itself to some nice alternative finishes ie the inlay is simply held in place via the taped backing so can be easily changed with the steel acting as a natural template.

- price I perceive as reasonable for the laser cutting and quality of steel used. nb If they had been twice the price they would have been going back.

At the end of the day I like them

Fitting should be a relatively easy process requiring the simple removal of the existing kick plates which are glued in place (time will be mostly removing old glue) and sticking these down with the backing tape already in place.

These will also meet my requirement to be fully reversible to OEM if required.

I will point the supplier to this post as I believe in customer feedback.

ps here are some OEM pictures for comparison...and why I prefer the laser cut finish......






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1997 Porsche 911 993 C4S My Journal
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Ex 2014 Porsche Boxster GTS My Journal
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Last edited by jonttt on Fri Jun 28, 2013 3:52 pm; edited 1 time in total
 
  
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Zingari
Brands Hatch
Brands Hatch


Joined: 25 Oct 2009
Posts: 13023
Location: Cheshire

1993 Porsche 964 Anniversary

PostPosted: Fri Jun 28, 2013 2:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just checked my sills and they look OEM pattern but bought from Porscheshop in Sept 2005 for £29 Surprised
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 28, 2013 3:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bargain for OEM ie 10% of the cost I have seen Thumb

There are ebay etched ones I have seen which are cheap but I have no idea of their quality. They may be a bargain if a direct template of OEM and good quality steel if used.
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
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Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Sun Jun 30, 2013 12:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Strasse have had my car for 3 weeks to complete some warranty work supplemented by upgrades I wanted and I picked it back up yesturday thumbsup

The main item of warranty work was a replacement Air conditioning Evaporator. The system had been working but would only retain gas for a few days before failing. The cause was identified as a failed evaporator which identified itself by a fluid leak via the passenger side front vent.

The evaporator itself is a few hundred pounds but the labour cost to change is very high as it involves a full strip out of fuel tank etc.... being located between the fuel tank and cabin bulkhead.

Needless to say I was pleased that this was all fully covered by the Strasse in house warranty which came with the car.

The air con was working fine beforehand for a few days ie readings of c8 degrees so I was pretty confident that the rest of the system was working fine. I now have these readings again and so the next week or so will confirm if I have a fully working system.

It will be nice to now that one of the more common expensive repairs due to age have been addresses at no cost to me Very Happy

Strasse also completed fitment of:

- new suspension Bilstein B8 & OEM M033 springs

- full geometry setup

- upgraded aluminium lower cam covers with new gaskets and bolts

- cat heat shield (mufflers were replaced when I had the RSR's fitted)

- new bolts etc... to exhaust system

- front brake shields

- stainless steel brake hoses

- new brake lines

- MPL slave clutch cylinder (more on that later)

- new clutch hose

So I've had chance to put the car through its paces to see what difference the new suspension and clutch salve cylinder have made........

Its worth noting that my car was on OEM 4S suspension all round so already had M033 springs (lowered but "normal" spring rate, the M030 is the harder spring as per the Turbo). The front dampers had been replaced c £10k miles ago so did not really need replacing. The rears where original showing signs of corrosion to both dampers and especially the springs. They did not NEED replacing but I worked on the basis that the rears carry all of the weight and after 60k miles would be tired compared to new. It was therefore as much OCD to fit a complete set of new dampers and springs.

So its worth noting I'm comparing to a setup which did not need replacing. Also I was after a setup which I perceived to be pretty close to how it left the factory.

Also the car had previously had a full geometry setup within the last 10k miles and so I am assuming geometry changes is not a major factor (but it may be).

Driving my favourite local B roads and I have to try to filter out the placebo effect. The car definately feels more settled / predictable mid bend and does not scuttle around on an uneven surface as much as it did ie you feel more confident to get the power back on earlier past the apex than I did before. On the straight the car again feels more planted with less vibration in the cabin ie it feels like the new dampers have made a difference.

Not a massive difference and if the car was not a keeper then it probably would have not been worth the cost of replacement (assume c£1700 fitted or a few hundred cheaper if you fit yourself).

As a keeper though its great to now that its one big tick mark off the list Very Happy

Moving onto the MPL slave clutch cylinder...... Strasse had expressed some concern over a number of these units which they had reverted back to stock. Their concern was that swapping over old seals etc... from the OEM units causes failure more quickly and they have also seen evidence of scoring in the cylinder (it may well be that the 2 are linked due to dust seal failure etc.. ?). They also said that some people preferred the feel of the OEM clutch.

So if you are going down this route it may be worth sourcing a new seal kit but I am not sure if these are available other than with a complete new OEM unit ?

So I was keen to try this mod out and see for myself what I thought......

First impressions are very good. I don't know how anyone can say they make no difference. It is markedly lighter in use than the OEM unit and will make the car much much easier to drive in stop start traffic.

The biting point is fine but at first it feels less precise than OEM. However having put in a good fast road run with plenty of gear changes needed I feel a big element is just getting to now effectively new car again as the change is that big. It is precise but just not as agressively so as OEM.

The only thing that concerned me was a "clicking" / notchy feel at full clutch depress. This did not affect on the go gear changes but stopped at traffic lights with the clutch pedal fully depressed it could be felt / heard. However this has now completey gone and so I assume was just the seals / springs bedding into their new home.

So the big question is which do I prefer. I think that if this was a track car I may well stay with OEM which is a proven product not likely to fail and would have a better feel suited to track use. However for a road car such as mine I much prefer the MPL unit. Time will tell how reliable it proves Wink


So all in all I'm very pleased to get the car back and have been buzzing around Liverpool with a big grin on my face Very Happy
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Last edited by jonttt on Sun Jun 30, 2013 11:10 pm; edited 1 time in total
 
  
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6370
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Sun Jun 30, 2013 1:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

3 weeks without my car meant I was itching for some tinkering Very Happy

Now I had already replaced the leather on my OEM gear stick which I have been more than pleased with. However I am always on the look out for a bargain and could not believe it when a Tequipment Carbon / allow gear stick for a 4 wheel drive 993 was put up for sale on eBay. These retail for c£650 Surprised and so where on my "would be nice to have but I have better things to spend my money on" list. But with the, what must be very rare, option to pick one up for £150 delivered I bought it straight away.

The only down side was that it came with no gear gator and these are not available seperately from Porsche. Not to worry as I have used a great manufacturer in the states who is very popular on the BMW scene. I was also aware that they specialised in older Porsches.

The company is Redlinegoods.com and you can browse their products HERE

They are a great bunch of guys and you don't normally get hit with any import or VAT as they label their stuff as "leather sample" to get around various animal product import restrictions.

So armed with my new gearstick and leather gator it was time to fit Very Happy .....

One very expensive nearly new Tequipment Carbon gear stick for a 4 wheel drive 993 .......




You can see that unlike the OEM unit this is retained via a hex bolt which is then hidden under the leather.

For the leather Gator I went for the more expensive Nappa leather to match my steering wheel with silver stitching........




Fitting was simply a matter of sliding the end over and turning the leather inside out......




and then pushing the gear stick onto the gear shaft all the way down......








Then secure the hex bolt in place.

The leather can then be pulled back down and around the retaining ring.




The fiddliest bit is pushing the retaining ring in place to secure the bottom of the leather in place.

It is worth noting that the leather is a perfect fit. RedLine have done the business again thumbsup

So the fitted item.......




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jonttt
Long Beach


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 11:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some other mods from the weekend I did not have chance to post up yesturday........

Front Protection Bar....




Rear centre console cassette holder delete....








nb the above is a temporary delete solution as I have plans for this.....




and now to one of the most controversial modifications you can do to any 1990's motor vehicle.......... cup holder installation Surprised

Now I understand the arguments for and against and believe me I have seen other forum threads as long as your arm on the subject Dont know but for me its quite simple = I would like somewhere to safely put a drink whilst driving.

The OEM solution is a clip on unit that attaches to the door pocket. I did not like this solution at all. In my research I came across a neat, removable, easily accessible and unobtrusive solution from the USA so I ordered one to try (nb the is a LHD and RHD version)........








This is really well made and easily just screws onto the seat runner.....








I'm very pleased with this controversial modification and will see how I get on with it in practice.
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Zingari
Brands Hatch
Brands Hatch


Joined: 25 Oct 2009
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1993 Porsche 964 Anniversary

PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looking good Jon Thumb That leather 'sample' looks like a Wizard's sleeve Grin
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jonttt
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 5:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have no idea what you are talking about Grin
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Lig
Spa-Francorchamps


Joined: 14 Apr 2013
Posts: 317
Location: West Yorkshire


PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 6:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wizard's sleeve, now that made me giggle.... My mate at uni used to say his ex had a fanny like a wizards sleeve...

Sorry guys Floor

Always good to keep up with this thread BTW - Whats the front protection bar thingy? Cant make it out on the diagrams...

[Lig - on his own in a London hotel after a couple of ales.....]
 
  
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6370
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 7:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The carnewal front protection car fits under the front bumper to protect the underside of the car ie it hits anything first.

It requires no drilling as it bolts into existing holes including a large bolt through the central drainage hole in the boot.

Sorry no pics on my car as I forgot to take any Embarassed
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6370
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Wed Jul 03, 2013 10:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I needed to get the wheels off yesturday to fit the TPMS sensors so took the opportunity to take a pic of the new Bilstein B8 Dampers, OEM M033 springs and Stainless Steel brake hoses fitted.




I know the wheel arch is not up to OCD standards but it was steam cleaned and waxoiled by Ninemeister a couple of years ago (c1,000 miles) and so cleaning would mean removing the waxoil which I don't want to do Wink
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Owl
Silverstone


Joined: 17 Dec 2012
Posts: 118
Location: North West


PostPosted: Wed Jul 03, 2013 11:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Car's looking good there Jon. Thumb

Have you noticed any discernible difference with having the s/s hoses fitted to the brakes?

I know the standard brake set up is generally pretty good for road use but it would be one of the things I might consider doing at some point if there is a real world difference??
 
  
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jonttt
Long Beach


Joined: 20 Aug 2012
Posts: 6370
Location: Liverpool


PostPosted: Wed Jul 03, 2013 12:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I noticed no difference on a fast road run but it was not a long one so not sure how hot the brake fluid actually got.

I replaced as the rears had split cosmetically which I believe is a common problem with water getting behind the rubber ?

The cost of the stainless steel kit (ie x4) was c £60 so probably cheaper than OEM rubber items (I never bothered to check) so I upgraded to steel ones.

I would only expect a real difference when the brake fluids get hot transferring heat to the rubber hoses which would more likely deform and not be as efficient in transferring hydraulic pressure to the brakes.

There is probably enough tolerance in the OEM hoses for this not to be a factor in road use ?
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2017 RR Evoque Autobiography
 
  
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Owl
Silverstone


Joined: 17 Dec 2012
Posts: 118
Location: North West


PostPosted: Wed Jul 03, 2013 1:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Jon - what you say makes sense.
 
  
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