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911Time
Monza


Joined: 25 Sep 2018
Posts: 160
Location: Staffordshire


PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2019 11:12 pm    Post subject: DSC Sport V3 PASM Controller Installed Today - 991.1 Reply with quote

Hi guys, I've been considering DSC Sport controller, after the option to reprogram the PASM system was bought to my attention by fellow members, when I was considering a 997 GTS and wondering whether the ride would be OK with my skeletal issues.

Having ruled out a 997 (much as I loved it), there's no doubt that the ride in the 991 is definitely better than the 997 (no offence) but clearly there's still room for improvement and even Porsche themselves seem to have recognised this, with the upgrades made to the suspension settings on the 992.

Prior to buying, I had some very enlightening discussions with the guys at DSC, about the 'basic' setup in their V3 unit, the way they've opened up the response range from the original Porsche (Bilstein) unit and how by using the suspension speed/travel sensors individual inputs, they've created a system that reacts to each individual wheel inputs, in a way that the original Porsche set-up did not - making for a more compliant AND reactive system, with more distinct variations across the Normal, Sport and Sport Plus (where fitted) settings.

All sounded very good and the whole thing can be adjusted via laptop, if you really want to create a bespoke set-up to your own liking or for track use.

As I've said elsewhere, I bought my unit from Nine Excellence and got a very good price and next day delivery (arrived yesterday) Thumb

As I have to be very careful physically nowadays, I asked one of my mates to help install it - bit cramped in the back but we did it ok and got some pics too.

PLEASE NOTE: The install is actually very simple BUT the official video and others I have seen, fail to adequately explain how the connectors come apart - they just say "slide off", when in actual fact there are two parts to the black connectors - you will see from the pics below that there are white plastic 'nipples' on the controller unit and part of the connector has diagonal slides that they sit in, the idea is that having turned over the unit (from its original installation position), you pull the lower part of the black connector to the left (holding the unit in your right hand), which raises the upper part of the connector (where the wires enter) and disconnects the multiplug.

My mate (who's into cars but not an engineer) thought the multiplugs just pulled out and was all for getting something (like a screwdriver) to lever them off - thankfully I stopped him and asked to have a closer look first, or it could've been a very expensive mistake Rolling Eyes

Anyway, all done now and having done a few hundred miles on the original set-up, I'm looking forward to trying out the DSC unit Thumb

Installation Instructions

IMPT: First make sure your ignition is off and the key is out.

New DSC Sport V3 Controller




Drop the rear seat backs (if fitted).





Lift the rear carpet from the middle - it's quite hefty with a thick foam back but pulls up easily once you get the hang of it. It's a good idea to prop it carefully with something solid, to help keep it out of the way whilst you work - we used an extension bar from my tool kit.

The PASM controller is the one in the middle, housed in a foam housing (you can lift the top of the foam unit) and you just carefully pull the unit towards you.



When you get it out, flip it over (so the wires and connectors are towards the back).



Now you can see the two black plastic connectors, each one is in two parts (though that's not easy to see at first), as I described earlier, with the white plastic 'nipples' of the unit located in diagonal slots or slides in each connector. Take the unit in your right hand and slide the lower part of the first left-hand black connector left (there is actually a place for your thumb to pull it left) - it might be stiff but persevere and the lower part will begin to slide, which in turn raises the upper part of the connector - disconnecting the wires.







Now you can move your attention onto the larger, right-hand connector and repeat the process BUT this time you are moving the slide to the RIGHT.





Carefully put the old unit on one side and grab the new DSC controller. Installation is the repeat of the process above. Positioning the connectors and sliding the lower portion of each left and right to engage them.







Flip the unit over, so the wires are facing the front, lift the top of the foam housing and carefully refit the unit, making sure to reposition the wires in the same places as they were on removal.



Remove the prop (if you used one) and push the carpet behind the left and right seat bolts, sliding the carpet behind the trims on either side, before pushing it down in the middle and raising the seat backs.







Job done!! Now, go and find some bumpy, twisty roads.... Smile Thumb
_________________
Mark


I'm not a perfectionist - I just want everything done 'Right' Wink

Current: GT Silver 991.1 C4S with a few 'special bits'. Previous: C63 Estate, BMW e92 330d Coupe (700Nm/Custom Exh/Map/BBK/Quaife/Breytons), ML63AMG, Alpina e46 B3S Coupe, Alpina e36 B3 Coupe, Lotus Excel SE, Alfasud Green Cloverleaf Ti, Lancia HPE, Capri 2.0S, Marina 1.8 (don't laugh it was my first road car) plus boring company cars. Bikes: Suzuki TL1000R and BMW R1100S AC Schnitzer.
 
  
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spongebob squarepants
Zolder


Joined: 20 Dec 2009
Posts: 5562
Location: Manchester and Iraq


PostPosted: Sat Apr 20, 2019 3:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thumb look forwards to your thoughts on the difference. As you say the 991.1 is an improvement over the 997, but especially with 20” alloys there’s room for more Thumb
_________________
991 C2S PDK with X51 430 powerkit in racing yellow, PCCB, PDCC, PSE, Carrera S alloys, Sports design package with ducktail.
“Herman yellow, the last of the naturally aspirated”

EX 997.2 Carrera 4S PDK
EX 997.2 Carrera S PDK
EX 993 C2 manual in guards red
EX 997 C2 gen 2 PDK
EX 993 Targa
EX 993 Carrera 4 manual
EX 996 3.4 Cabriolet

Racing Yellow, there really is no substitute
 
  
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Aikidoka
Trainee


Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Posts: 50
Location: London


PostPosted: Sat Apr 20, 2019 5:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This was my first upgrade to my 991.1. GT3 and it has transformed the car. Ken at 9e recommended it and installed it without any issues and set it up for fast road and it has been a revelation. There is far more compliance and it does seem to help mitigate dive and squat.
_________________
991.1 GT3 with Brooke race exhaust and DSC module (Ken at 9e)
 
  
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911Time
Monza


Joined: 25 Sep 2018
Posts: 160
Location: Staffordshire


PostPosted: Sat Apr 20, 2019 8:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Took the car on a road trip across to Lake Vyrnwy today, taking our usual route into Wales, which includes local roads and some fast A-roads but mainly quiet B-roads through mid Wales.

One trip may not be enough to give a full review but my initial impressions of the DSC unit are as follows:

Normal Setting: The change isn't 'night & day' (the car doesn't suddenly ride like a Limo but it wouldn't on 20" alloys on sports springs) BUT on our poor quality roads, the sometimes brittle edge to the ride has gone, the car now rides over potholes and uneven tarmac with far more compliance and there is a real sense that the body remains more level now, whilst the suspension does its job independently - rather than simply feeding energy from every bump back into the chassis.

Sport Setting: The car feels a lot more composed than before and again, each suspension unit now seems to be doing its job independently, which means not only does the car ride better in a straight line (especially along broken tarmac) but it feels better balanced and mid-corner bumps are less likely to knock it off line, or lead to those slightly hair raising moments, when rapid steering changes are necessary.

On uneven B-roads with twists, turns and variable surfaces, the DSC controller gave greater confidence to keep the engine on song in the lower gears, relying on the suspension to soak up the bumps in order to keep laying down the power from one corner to the next, making more use of the car's prodigious performance, (whenever it was safe to do so and the opportunity allowed Laughing)

So far, on the smiles per mile counter I can't see a downside, other than perhaps the inevitable hit on fuel consumption, that comes from being able to use that glorious engine more of the time.

DSC V3 Thumb from me.
_________________
Mark


I'm not a perfectionist - I just want everything done 'Right' Wink

Current: GT Silver 991.1 C4S with a few 'special bits'. Previous: C63 Estate, BMW e92 330d Coupe (700Nm/Custom Exh/Map/BBK/Quaife/Breytons), ML63AMG, Alpina e46 B3S Coupe, Alpina e36 B3 Coupe, Lotus Excel SE, Alfasud Green Cloverleaf Ti, Lancia HPE, Capri 2.0S, Marina 1.8 (don't laugh it was my first road car) plus boring company cars. Bikes: Suzuki TL1000R and BMW R1100S AC Schnitzer.
 
  
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