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Mr 911
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Joined: 25 Sep 2015
Posts: 53



PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2019 2:08 pm    Post subject: Driving to Sweden - ANY ADVICE Reply with quote

Hi everyone

Driving to Sweden shortly, via France, Belgium, Holland, Germany & Denmark. Has anyone done this?

I have a Green Card and an International Driving Permit, plus European Breakdown Cover, so I have taken care of the initial essentials

However, I was wondering if you guys had any other advice such as;

Do I need to put head-light de-flectors on as I know its mandatory in Sweden for example to use day-light driving lights. If so, how?

Also, since I have owned my 997, I have put nothing but Shell V-Power in it. I assume you can buy the same/ equivalent on route through the above countries? However, if I have to opt for use the normal unleaded, is this likely to affect/ damage my engine?

Sorry if some of the above sounds silly, its just I want to make sure everything goes to plan. thumbsup

Any comments/ advice would be greatly received

Cheers

K H
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pzero
General
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Joined: 18 Jul 2010
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2019 2:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds like a good trip.

No need to mess around with bits of sticky tape for your headlights, just flick the switch on the back of each headlight from "O" to "T". Instructions are in your handbook, alternatively have a search on here, there are more than enough threads describing how to do it.

As for petrol and differing grades of RON, again there are untold threads on here describing how this may affect performance and how Porsche engines cope and deal with various grades of fuel.

Good luck. thumbsup
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MaxA
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2019 2:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi KH

I might be able to provide a little insight as I tend to go the other way, from Finland across Sweden, Denmark etc.

In that order, driving in Sweden is no biggie, and if you stick to 130kmh on the motorway you’ll be fine as there aren’t too many traffic police anymore. There are however plenty of speed cameras on Swedish A roads, so be careful. Shell V Power is readily available. Credit cards are widely accepted. Both Stockholm and Gothenburg have congestion charges between 8-18 on weekdays. Usually, you just get a bill in the post. Pay it quickly.

Denmark won’t take long, but there are a couple of issues. You absolutely must indicate when changing lanes on the motorway, or you’ll get a ticket. Again, stick to 130kmh on the motorway. And Shell V Power and any 98/99 octane can be hard to come by. Fill up in Germany, arrive in Sweden on fumes. The cars ECU will manage however, so don’t panic if caught short. And they used to need a DanKort to pay for everything but credit cards are now more widely accepted … but perhaps not in a tiny little village store. It’s fun to drive across the bridges, but the tolls are quite high.

Germany is fun, and the unlimited autobahn is getting more rare with all the traffic, but you might get lucky. If you do, watch your mirrors like a hawk as - even if you’re getting a move on - there’s some bloke doing a great deal more and he won’t want to be held up. The speed differential on a two lane road (lorries doing 80 or 100, BMW doing 200 can be scary, especially if some groaner in a Yaris pops out into the fast lane in front of you). I think it’s common knowledge that you’re not allowed to run out of fuel on the autobahn.

I think the 911s have a switch somewhere in behind the headlights for driving on the continent, perhaps someone will oblige.

As to stuff to carry, you need a hi-viz and I’d suggest some spare glasses/sunglasses if you wear them. And always carry ID.

MaxA
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Jay.
Montreal


Joined: 20 Oct 2015
Posts: 535
Location: Brize Norton


PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2019 11:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MaxA wrote:
Hi KH

I might be able to provide a little insight as I tend to go the other way, from Finland across Sweden, Denmark etc.

In that order, driving in Sweden is no biggie, and if you stick to 130kmh on the motorway you’ll be fine as there aren’t too many traffic police anymore. There are however plenty of speed cameras on Swedish A roads, so be careful. Shell V Power is readily available. Credit cards are widely accepted. Both Stockholm and Gothenburg have congestion charges between 8-18 on weekdays. Usually, you just get a bill in the post. Pay it quickly.

Denmark won’t take long, but there are a couple of issues. You absolutely must indicate when changing lanes on the motorway, or you’ll get a ticket. Again, stick to 130kmh on the motorway. And Shell V Power and any 98/99 octane can be hard to come by. Fill up in Germany, arrive in Sweden on fumes. The cars ECU will manage however, so don’t panic if caught short. And they used to need a DanKort to pay for everything but credit cards are now more widely accepted … but perhaps not in a tiny little village store. It’s fun to drive across the bridges, but the tolls are quite high.

Germany is fun, and the unlimited autobahn is getting more rare with all the traffic, but you might get lucky. If you do, watch your mirrors like a hawk as - even if you’re getting a move on - there’s some bloke doing a great deal more and he won’t want to be held up. The speed differential on a two lane road (lorries doing 80 or 100, BMW doing 200 can be scary, especially if some groaner in a Yaris pops out into the fast lane in front of you). I think it’s common knowledge that you’re not allowed to run out of fuel on the autobahn.

I think the 911s have a switch somewhere in behind the headlights for driving on the continent, perhaps someone will oblige.

As to stuff to carry, you need a hi-viz and I’d suggest some spare glasses/sunglasses if you wear them. And always carry ID.

MaxA


You can download some pretty good "route" apps too for your phone, depending on your international data coverage.

Always carry some cash and a dictionary (or translator app) in case you need to fill up somewhere off the beaten track

Bring a load of water (I personally bring several bottles).

Summer isnt too bad but I always end up with a dirty windshield and go through windscreen wash very quickly
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infrasilver
Fast & Furious
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2019 12:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I drove there and back last year via Switzerland, Germany, Denmark etc and there was nothing special required. As already mentioned, switch your headlights over to Tourist setting and just have them on all the time, I only ever saw Police cars close to cities and not many at all, outside of any cities I saw none, I did push the speed limits when I felt the need.

If going into a city or by one. Gothenburg there are Road Toll camera's which you need to register in advance for, I didn't, Stockholm City and Gothenburg ring road and have not heard a thing from them.....yet!

The Toll bridges on route from Denmark to Sweden are very expensive but the views from them are quite stunning and they are a feat of engineering, luckily I claimed my Tolls back on expenses though.

One thing I did notice was massive piles of blood on the road, one very fresh, where I assume Moose/Elk had wandered in to the road. Most of the roads are sectioned off from the wildlife but every so often there is a break in the fencing and Moose signs are present, be aware on these sections, especially if travelling in the dark. Most locals have a ton of spot lights on the front for night driving because of this.
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Y2K
Nürburgring


Joined: 08 Mar 2016
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Location: Hampshire


PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2019 12:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great trip.

If stopping at Gothenburg and have spare time then head to Volvo Museum. Great collection there at the museum and Gothenburg is a great city (perfect for weekend city break) I didn’t have to pay any toll or congestion charge but that was in 2017.

Trollhattan up the road makes a good lunch stop; Saab Museum is a bit small though.

And obviously you have to stop by Oresund bridge for a picture. (Malmo side)



Cool self-service Shell at the side of a motorway in Denmark.



Have fun!
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Mr 911
Trainee


Joined: 25 Sep 2015
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2019 11:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many thanks everyone

I really value the comments and advice shared here

Cheers

K H
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infrasilver
Fast & Furious
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2019 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Y2K wrote:
Trollhattan up the road makes a good lunch stop; Saab Museum is a bit small though.


This is probably my favourite picture of 2018 in Trollhatten, I did an overnight stay en route to Denmark.


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MaxA
Barcelona


Joined: 11 Oct 2015
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2019 2:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a great picture ^.

We'll be back in Sweden again this summer to rip around the track at Knutstorp in Skåne.
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Hans Gruber
Monza


Joined: 24 Mar 2015
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2002 Porsche 996 Carrera 4S

PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2019 9:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice warm coat, flask of tea (preferably Yorkshire)

Boom.
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Alex
Le Mans
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2019 10:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Double check with your car insurance and request it in writing or email what cover your insurance is in any of the countries you travel in. Not all provide fully comp. on the mainland even though you have a fully comp. policy.
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