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cvega
Spa-Francorchamps


Joined: 25 Feb 2013
Posts: 253
Location: Cambridge


PostPosted: Fri Dec 28, 2018 11:51 pm    Post subject: 275/35 vs 265/35 Reply with quote

for some reason it's easier to find Michelin PS4 in the 275/35 size rather than 265/35, i'm on carrera wheels (1Cool, i assume this should work ok?
_________________

2003 996 C2
2017 Leaf 30kWh
gone: 2010 335d, 2007 Cayman S, 2008 Civic Type-R, 1992 MR2 Turbo ,1994 MR2 N/A
 
  
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asterix_the_gaul
Barcelona


Joined: 20 Dec 2008
Posts: 1275
Location: Cheshire

1999 Porsche 996 Carrera 2

PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2018 9:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You have a 2003 C2 car from looking at your signature, so that's supposed to run 285/30/18 at the rear, the pre facelift cars ran 265/35/18. There is some feeling that 285 rears are a bit wide and there is more than enough rubber on a 265 profile..
Running 275 35 18 is going to give you a bigger rolling radius at the rear, the tyre wall is going to be taller than the two normal sizes, your speedo may be a tiny bit out. Tyreleader has 265 35 19 PS4 in stock if you want that
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1992 944 S2 Cabriolet, Cobalt Blue/Classic grey -gone!
1995 993 C2 Cabriolet, Midnight Blue/Marble grey -gone!
1999 996 C2 Coupe, Ocean Blue/Graphite grey
2002 E46 M3 Cabriolet, Laguna seca blue/LSB
 
  
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Marky911
Magny-Cours


Joined: 04 Jun 2009
Posts: 2517



PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2018 11:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Asterix is right with pretty much all of that although as you say Asterix sone of it is opinion. I wouldn't be fitting 265s on a mk2 as it should have 285/30.

My Mk1 should have 265s but they look stretched and under tyred to me so I've gone for Mk1 GT3 sizes which are 285/30. People always go on about "too much grip". I'd wager nobody will feel any difference at road speeds. The Mk1 GT3 only had 360bhp vs 300/320 for C2s so not a quantum leap ahead that required loads more grip.

The side wall heights are as follows.

265/35 = 92.75mm
275/35 = 96.25mm
285/30 = 85.5mm

So the 275 is 3.5mm higher radius wise than a 265. Once it's worn a bit it'll be the same as the 265.

I'd be going that route. I nearly did with Michelin Supersports as they didn't come in the ideal size either.
Of just choose another tyre. You don't have to do the N rated thing on anything out of Porsche warranty.
 
  
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cvega
Spa-Francorchamps


Joined: 25 Feb 2013
Posts: 253
Location: Cambridge


PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2018 12:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks folks. My car is a 996.2 and has 225/40/18 and 265/35/18 as standard, and that's how websites selling tyres identify it based on license plate. (blackcircles.com for example). I put UNiroyal Rainsport 3's on the car and it ruined the handling - those tyres have super soft sidewalls. I have to replace them with MIchelins or ANYTHING harder Sad

However, it seems hard to find PS4's in both sizes at the same time at the moment that are not priced ridiculously. 275/35 seems to be cheaper. That's why I asked.
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cvega
Spa-Francorchamps


Joined: 25 Feb 2013
Posts: 253
Location: Cambridge


PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2018 12:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://www.willtheyfit.com/index.php?width=265&aspect=35&diameter=18&wheelwidth=10&offset=65&width2=275&aspect2=35&wheel_size=18&wheel_width=10&offset2=65

Interesting comparison.
Looks like the speedo will under-read (which is fine, since it over-reads now Smile), slight ride height gain and arch gap loss - which is fine for me at the moment, car is low slung as hell.
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asterix_the_gaul
Barcelona


Joined: 20 Dec 2008
Posts: 1275
Location: Cheshire

1999 Porsche 996 Carrera 2

PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2018 3:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Will they fit is a great resource for these kinds of questions: I have completely wrong rear tyres on mine aspect ratio wise but my speedo reads bang on to GPS. The tyre wall is noticeably taller at the rear but how often do you stand there looking. No where near needing to change mine yet so not thinking too hard about it, but if it went any lower I'm going to be scraping a lot more..
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1992 944 S2 Cabriolet, Cobalt Blue/Classic grey -gone!
1995 993 C2 Cabriolet, Midnight Blue/Marble grey -gone!
1999 996 C2 Coupe, Ocean Blue/Graphite grey
2002 E46 M3 Cabriolet, Laguna seca blue/LSB
 
  
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JTT
Trainee


Joined: 11 Nov 2015
Posts: 89
Location: Halifax, NS Canada


PostPosted: Sun Dec 30, 2018 3:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been running 275/35-18s for three years now without issue on a 2003
 
  
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cvega
Spa-Francorchamps


Joined: 25 Feb 2013
Posts: 253
Location: Cambridge


PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2019 3:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks chaps. For some reason PS4's are far easier to buy in 275/35 then 265/35.
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2017 Leaf 30kWh
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Martin996RSR
Spa-Francorchamps


Joined: 08 Dec 2016
Posts: 361



PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2019 2:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm currently running 255s on the back and if the rim was narrow enough I would go to 245. It's grip at the front that's the probelm, not the back. However, if it's just the aesthetic that you're after then go as wide as you want. 305 is over tyred just the same as 285.
 
  
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toobusy
Nürburgring


Joined: 12 Nov 2009
Posts: 378
Location: Rutland - UK


PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2019 3:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I put new tyres on I checked the Michelin website, they recommend 285/ 30s

https://www.michelin.co.uk/tyres/car-tyres#type=type_2&brand=porsche&range=911%20type%20996&model=911%20carrera%204&engine=3.6%20l%20320&year=1997%20-%202005&selectedFitment=285-30-18-0-ZR&selectedFilter=winter&fronthighwaypressure=36.26&frontnormalpressure=31.91&rearhighwaypressure=43.51&rearnormalpressure=36.26&frontDimension=225-40-18-0-ZR&rearDimension=285-30-18-0-ZR&retainFitment=285-30-18-0-ZR

They seem fine to me!
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Magic919
Suzuka


Joined: 05 Jun 2013
Posts: 1221
Location: Berkshire


PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2019 3:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I always had 285s on the rear of the 996.2. 265 is the 996.1 size.
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Marky911
Magny-Cours


Joined: 04 Jun 2009
Posts: 2517



PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2019 4:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Martin996RSR wrote:
I'm currently running 255s on the back and if the rim was narrow enough I would go to 245. It's grip at the front that's the probelm, not the back. However, if it's just the aesthetic that you're after then go as wide as you want. 305 is over tyred just the same as 285.


Trouble with that is that 265(Mk1)-285(mk2) is the proper size that Porsche designed the other aspects of the car around, such as suspension etc.
305 isn't.

Sounds like what you need is a set of space savers. Ultimate narrow contact patch for the driving gods.
Forget about all the work Porsche put in when designing the car. They messed up bigstyle those jokers, they don't know ***** from yellow clay. Wink
 
  
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Martin996RSR
Spa-Francorchamps


Joined: 08 Dec 2016
Posts: 361



PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2019 4:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Or Porsche thought 'hmm, our market research has indicated that potential customers regard a wide rear tyre as in indicator of performance and desirability and so we'll sell more cars as if we put the widest tyre on it that doesn't look daft.'

Take a look at ELA's thread regarding his build. He uses 255 section rears. Presumably you should post the same dismissive remarks in his build thread.
 
  
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Marky911
Magny-Cours


Joined: 04 Jun 2009
Posts: 2517



PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2019 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmm, I'd agree if you were talking about wheel diameter, which has definitely gone down the "bigger is automatically better" route by manufacturers.
Not so much with tyre width though.
I don't think any buyers would have bought or not bought a 996 back in the day due to it having 255, 265 or 285 tyres fitted.

Rich's car is massively different to almost all other 996s. It's over 200kg lighter than it was, hence much less mass to control and much less load on the tyres.

When we are talking largely standard cars I'll stick to what to Porsche spent hundreds of thousands developing.
We'll have to agree to disagree. Thumb

Oh and my comments were just banter and no more dismissive than yours, which suggested anyone using 285's was "just after the aesthetic".
If you make a comment like that you can't then get the hump because someone answers. Grin
 
  
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Martin996RSR
Spa-Francorchamps


Joined: 08 Dec 2016
Posts: 361



PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2019 5:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think you're not really grasping how the selling of cars works. BMWs of nearly all ilks have always come with standard tyre widths wider than equivalent cars from other manufacturers. Is it because their suspension designs are inferior and they need the extra tyre width in order to make up the difference? Of course not, -it's because they are sold under the tag line of 'the ultimate driving machine..' and all the sporting pretensions that goes along with that. BMW knows that this creates the expectation that a BMW is a sporty car that requires more rubber,(even though a 316 on 225 section tyres is as pointless as a Mondeo 1.8 on 225 section tyres) and by giving it wider tyres than the competition they will pander to that expectation and sell more cars.

Porsche did/does the same thing. Just what is the benefit that you think Porsche has designed in by specifying 285 section tyres on a car that only puts down 315 hp? Even the BMW e46 M3 (which actually had sensible tyres on, unlike BMW's non-M cars) has 255 section rears but with more power and torque to handle.
 
  
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Marky911
Magny-Cours


Joined: 04 Jun 2009
Posts: 2517



PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2019 9:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We are just going to go round in circles here I think and I don't want to derail the OPs thread.

You are happy with your tyre choice. I personally wouldn't be. It's not a Porsche recommended size for your car and it's the absolute narrowest width of tyre you should run on a 10" wide rim.

The point about E46 M3s isn't really relevant. Different engine layout, weight distribution, etc.
Yes they run narrower tyres but they also run narrower rims, 9" wide for 18s, 9.5" wide for 19s, so 255 is correct for those.

I very much doubt most drivers would feel the difference between 255, 265 or 285 at road speeds, but if you feel otherwise that's great, you can be happy with your 255s. You just shouldn't make out that anyone who runs 285s is only a vein poser, as technically you're the one using the wrong size tyres.

Again I'll stick with what Porsche recommends.

Things like suspension components and setup make a meaningful difference on the road. Dropping a tyre width or two doesn't.

Genuine question -
Years ago all the Mk1 GT3 track lads used to go up to Mk2 sizes (295) for greater tyre choice. These were cars being used properly and on the limit.
Why didn't they all drop down to 255s for all the benefits it brings?

Anyway, genuinely no offence but opinion isn't fact. Thumb
 
  
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911munKy
Montreal


Joined: 26 Nov 2014
Posts: 536



PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2019 10:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think this helps sum up the difference of opinion, it’s about an AMG Merc but thee demonstration of tyre widths still applies. Fun vs performance.

https://youtu.be/HPh90yNX-mY
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Dammit
Indianapolis


Joined: 23 Sep 2016
Posts: 2274



PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2019 11:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My AMG C55 has 255 section rear tyres and 370 bhp/400Nm, but the engine is in the other end of the car. My 911 is on 285 rears, but in my defence I'm currently engaged in a project to raise power beyond that of the Merc.
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Marky911
Magny-Cours


Joined: 04 Jun 2009
Posts: 2517



PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2019 12:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Totally munky. Thumb

Top gear showed the same thing with a super quick Caterham vs the skinny tyred, basic one with half the power.

Skinny tyres = fun, because you can throw the car round with it losing grip at slower speeds. Trouble is none of us can do that on the road. You'd have to go drifting.

So it's all a bit pointless unless the driver wants to crash or get banned. Grin

Plus the difference between a 255 and 285 is nothing like the difference between a 225 and a 125, so again I don't believe there'll be anything more than a tiny subtle difference that most people wouldn't even notice, when taking 285 to 255.
 
  
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911Tip
Newbie


Joined: 30 Aug 2018
Posts: 32



PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2019 9:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Went with the below on my 996 mk1 C2 and they have been fine (general driving and some very spirited driving, but not tracking it).

Michelin Pilot Sport 4 PS4 - 225/40 R18 (92Y) XL TL Fuel Eff.: C Wet Grip: A NoiseClass: 2 Noise: 71dB

Michelin Pilot Sport 4 PS4 - 275/35 R18 (99Y) XL TL Fuel Eff.: C Wet Grip: A NoiseClass: 2 Noise: 71dB

If I could have got 265 in the PS4's I would have got those instead. Wanted the newer compound and best wet grip - even at cost of slight increased understeer. No noticeable (to me) impact on PSM.

Edit: my rims wouldn't support 285 as they are the older style.
 
  
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