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searider
Silverstone


Joined: 07 Feb 2013
Posts: 137
Location: Southampton


PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2018 11:49 am    Post subject: cleaning dust and rust from drilled discs? Reply with quote

Is there a special tool for cleaning the dirt and crap that accumulates in the holes in drilled discs?

Or is it simply a case of using a suitably sized drill?

Thanks

Duncan
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alex yates
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2018 11:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Suitably sized drill.
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searider
Silverstone


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2018 11:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cheers thumbsup
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G2
Österreich


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2018 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Apparently using the Hoover so that it belches black dust out the next time it's turned on in the living room ain't acceptable.... frustrated Hand The Wife
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infrasilver
Fast & Furious
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Joined: 04 Oct 2010
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Location: East Midlands

2001 Porsche 996 Targa

PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2018 1:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The crud build up is more than just dust, it sets like concrete and only a drill will get it all out. Most discs have a outside hole opposite the inside hole making life easier by letting you drill through both at the same time but I have had some discs that have been slightly offset and that made the job a lot harder.

I always drill mine out before venturing off on a road trip, you need the brakes to be at their best for Alpine passes.
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porkyb1
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2018 6:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Before I changed to slotted Girodiscs I cleaned out the holes after every track day using a suitable size screw, so it didn't need much effort to remove dust.

I've seen some use a power washer but I guess that would leave some to really harden on your next drive.
 
  
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wasz
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Joined: 28 Dec 2012
Posts: 2582


1999 Porsche 996 Carrera 2

PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2018 7:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes the special solution is just fit grooved discs or plain vented discs!

The holes are surely a marginal gain if that. They only really serve to clog the vents up with dust if you don't keep cleaning them out!
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infrasilver
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2018 9:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Using a power washer can leave the rear holes still plugged and that then has the potential for the disc sides to be running at different temps which in turn could warp them.
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alex yates
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2018 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Running a drill through all the holes is by far the best solution........unless you have access to an etching plant Grin
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infrasilver
Fast & Furious
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2018 10:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

alex yates wrote:
Running a drill through all the holes is by far the best solution........unless you have access to an etching plant Grin


Totally, just use a light drill or even better a Dremel type tool and it doesn't take too long.
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maldren
Österreich


Joined: 07 Oct 2016
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2018 8:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

alex yates wrote:
Running a drill through all the holes is by far the best solution.


Agreed. If you use the drill bit manually, you'll be fine, however if you use an electric drill (much quicker), set the drill bit length so that you don't drill into the back plate.
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alex yates
Brands Hatch
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2018 9:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Grin
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abcarrera
Newbie


Joined: 14 Apr 2018
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2018 6:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Advice about blocked disc vent holes please.

I did a track evening at Snetterton in my gen2 996 last week. Car performed powerwise great, but after the initial laps I noticed under hard braking a feel of judder through the brake pedal and car. Came into the paddock to take a quick look around, everything looked fine, admittedly everything very hot, let the car cool for a while and then went out again, first couple of warm up laps fine and then when I pushed on a bit the same thing into hard braking areas, this was pretty unpleasant and a bit worrying. I left it for a good 20 mins to cool down and went out one last time and same issue, basically could do 2 hot laps before the judder returned.
The discs are not warped as they fine on normal driving, braking etc.
On close inspection the following morning, the cross drilled holes that I can see are 90% blocked with dust/crud, is it possible this was the cause of the brake performance drop off, I have read several forums with technical explanations about gas build up on disc face at pad/disc interface etc etc.
I no track day monster and probably only do a couple a year, as unlike when I used to have a track focused Clio 200 and it loved to be abused, I don’t feel the same desire to rag the heck out of the 996. But when I do drive a few laps I want to know it going to be a relatively safe event.
99.9% of my driving is on road so don’t want to go all track focused on the brake setup, but would there be a pad that would take into account the odd track excursion that would not compromise my normal road driving, don’t want to be squealing to a stop when driving normally!
Advice/observations would be greatly appreciated.
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DynoMike
Barcelona


Joined: 25 May 2012
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Location: The Cotswolds

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2018 10:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've just bought a Big Boi blower from Ultimate Finish in Kent. Took it out of the box and noticed it came with a small nozzle adaptor, so put it on max speed and tried it on the discs, success!! It blew all of the crud clean out of the holes but showered me in clouds of brake dust at the same time Grin

The discs were bone dry, I doubt this would happen if they were wet. The blower is 3kw, so close to 4 hp, and is intended to be a car dryer. I was staggered that it cleaned the disc holes out. It also blew a ton of crud out of my radiator vents, so happy days.
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infrasilver
Fast & Furious
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Joined: 04 Oct 2010
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Location: East Midlands

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2018 12:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I remember some years ago when I used to read up on the technical way cars work, IIRC there is a very thin build up of gasses between the pad and the disc, similar to when driving in the heavy rain, the whole tread is never in full contact with the tarmac.

The drilled vent holes allow the pad to fully press on the disc and the gas to vent where non drilled don't. I always check the holes before a track day or high alpine road trip as this will stop brake fade and keep the brakes cooler.
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wasz
Magny-Cours


Joined: 28 Dec 2012
Posts: 2582


1999 Porsche 996 Carrera 2

PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2018 7:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I expect grooved discs would do the same and no faff with drill bits or big boys blowers...
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abcarrera
Newbie


Joined: 14 Apr 2018
Posts: 41
Location: Norwich


PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 7:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DynoMike wrote:
I've just bought a Big Boi blower from Ultimate Finish in Kent. Took it out of the box and noticed it came with a small nozzle adaptor, so put it on max speed and tried it on the discs, success!! It blew all of the crud clean out of the holes but showered me in clouds of brake dust at the same time Grin

The discs were bone dry, I doubt this would happen if they were wet. The blower is 3kw, so close to 4 hp, and is intended to be a car dryer. I was staggered that it cleaned the disc holes out. It also blew a ton of crud out of my radiator vents, so happy days.


Thanks for your input! That blower sounds the dogs danglies! I have this image of the F1 pit stops with the air guns blowing brake dust everywhere.
It must be powerful if it clears out those holes, I did a few with the wheel on and it was taking a little bit of effort to push the dust through, plus to do it properly will be wheels off as I have a set of Fuchs on my car so not a great deal of disc is seen anyway.
I had thought about a blower for drying y cars when they washed but never justified to myself when monster size microfibre towels are at hand, but ow maybe with a secondary use I can justify it now, if you don’t mind me asking is the blower expensive? Ave you used it for drying your car? Does it work well?
Thanks again bye
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Gone but not forgotten
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abcarrera
Newbie


Joined: 14 Apr 2018
Posts: 41
Location: Norwich


PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 7:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

infrasilver wrote:
I remember some years ago when I used to read up on the technical way cars work, IIRC there is a very thin build up of gasses between the pad and the disc, similar to when driving in the heavy rain, the whole tread is never in full contact with the tarmac.

The drilled vent holes allow the pad to fully press on the disc and the gas to vent where non drilled don't. I always check the holes before a track day or high alpine road trip as this will stop brake fade and keep the brakes cooler.


Thanks for the input, so seems like the blocked holes were probably the cause of the poor brake performance, I know track driving is so different to fast road as unless you are driving an alpine pass then you never brake repeatedly and so hard so often.

Do you use a different pad for track days or just go with the standard pads?

Many thanks bye
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Current car: 1998 996 C2,LSD, No sunroof, aero kit, sports seats, coil overs.
2002 996 C2, Braid Fuch (ex CLR), Exe-tc coil overs.
Boxster S 2015
BMW 535d Msport remapped 360 BHP 😊

Gone but not forgotten
2005 987 Boxster S
2007 997 Turbo
1990 964 C2 Cabriolet
1995 993 C2 with factory RS rep kit.
1987 911 3.2 Carrera
1982 911 SC
1983 911 SC
1991 944 Turbo
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abcarrera
Newbie


Joined: 14 Apr 2018
Posts: 41
Location: Norwich


PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 7:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

wasz wrote:
I expect grooved discs would do the same and no faff with drill bits or big boys blowers...


You may well be right!! Trouble is my discs are pretty new, and like I mentioned I a very occasional track day enthusiast, my annual mileage is pretty low 3k so I will struggle to need new discs anytime soon. I was thinking perhaps a slightly more aggressive pad may help? But I guess the build up of dust could be even quicker tho? Perhaps better cooling is an idea?

Or just go with it and realise it can’t do both brilliantly as there has to be a trade off and primarily it a fast road car.

Thanks for your input. bye
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Current car: 1998 996 C2,LSD, No sunroof, aero kit, sports seats, coil overs.
2002 996 C2, Braid Fuch (ex CLR), Exe-tc coil overs.
Boxster S 2015
BMW 535d Msport remapped 360 BHP 😊

Gone but not forgotten
2005 987 Boxster S
2007 997 Turbo
1990 964 C2 Cabriolet
1995 993 C2 with factory RS rep kit.
1987 911 3.2 Carrera
1982 911 SC
1983 911 SC
1991 944 Turbo
1981 924 Turbo
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DynoMike
Barcelona


Joined: 25 May 2012
Posts: 1460
Location: The Cotswolds

2003 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 7:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

abcarrera wrote:
DynoMike wrote:
I've just bought a Big Boi blower from Ultimate Finish in Kent. Took it out of the box and noticed it came with a small nozzle adaptor, so put it on max speed and tried it on the discs, success!! It blew all of the crud clean out of the holes but showered me in clouds of brake dust at the same time Grin

The discs were bone dry, I doubt this would happen if they were wet. The blower is 3kw, so close to 4 hp, and is intended to be a car dryer. I was staggered that it cleaned the disc holes out. It also blew a ton of crud out of my radiator vents, so happy days.


Thanks for your input! That blower sounds the dogs danglies! I have this image of the F1 pit stops with the air guns blowing brake dust everywhere.
It must be powerful if it clears out those holes, I did a few with the wheel on and it was taking a little bit of effort to push the dust through, plus to do it properly will be wheels off as I have a set of Fuchs on my car so not a great deal of disc is seen anyway.
I had thought about a blower for drying y cars when they washed but never justified to myself when monster size microfibre towels are at hand, but ow maybe with a secondary use I can justify it now, if you don’t mind me asking is the blower expensive? Ave you used it for drying your car? Does it work well?
Thanks again bye


Haven’t managed to use it to dry the car yet but hope to very soon. Personally, I would imagine a large microfibre would be more efficient. I bought this because of my physical situation, which makes it difficult to reach some areas of the car to properly dry it.

But one area of washing had always bugged me - the discs going rusty. I think that this blower will stop that. It was around £150, I had a 10% discount via one of their many special offers. The fact that it blew all of the dust out of the holes was a nice bonus.

In terms of brakes, all one piece discs will judder under heavy braking, but then return to normal after cooling down. So the best thing to do is get more cooling on the car, change the fluid for Castrol SRF and get some better pads. I strongly recommend contacting Nick at Uber9s. Also known as Nxi20 on here, as he is a brake specialist for 911s.
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