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Robertb
Long Beach


Joined: 01 Sep 2003
Posts: 6531
Location: South Oxfordshire

2002 Porsche 996 Carrera 4S

PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2018 2:11 pm    Post subject: Brake discs...DIY noob? Reply with quote

I've bought some rear brake discs for my 996 4S, and fancy giving DIY fitting a go. I am not an experienced mechanic. Is it reasonably straightforward? I've watched the obligatory YouTube vids, it looks OK.

My concerns are...
-levering the pistons apart; can I cause damage doing this?
-that the screws holding the discs on will be seized

Anything else that can/will go wrong? Any tips?

Rather than taking off the caliper initially, can I have a go at the disc screws first, and if they are seized quietly put the wheel back on and take it to the indy?

Brake pads were changed not too long ago, so the pins etc should come apart OK.
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mr_stevo
Trainee


Joined: 02 Apr 2014
Posts: 80
Location: County Durham


PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2018 2:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I did mine the hardest part was getting the pad retaining pin out as it corrodes itself in place, spent a lot of time knocking it back and forth and rubbing it with emery cloth/wd40 in between.

The rest was fairly simple including undoing the disc retaining screw although I used an impact driver.

Pushing the pads back is ok just remember to unscrew the fluid reservoir and don't have the handbrake on.
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jpsh120
Hockenheim


Joined: 30 Aug 2015
Posts: 646
Location: Somerset


PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2018 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mr_stevo wrote:
Pushing the pads back is ok just remember to unscrew the fluid reservoir and don't have the handbrake on.


Or better still open the bleed nipple, just in case the fluid over spills the reservoir.

Assuming the pistons just push back in as opposed to screw then you can use a large G clamp to do it.

In addition to the retaining screws that can be a pig, the caliper bolts can also seize. Give them a coating of penetrating fluid beforehand to make it easier.

If you have good access then you can normally get enough leverage to move them, but if you are restricted to working on the deck then it's not quite as easy.

Good luck Thumb
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moorhouse
Nürburgring


Joined: 15 Apr 2013
Posts: 451
Location: Northumberland


PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2018 3:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Should be pretty straightforward - just make sure the crosshead screwdriver is a good fit in the retaining screws. A quick squirt of WD40 should help and I generally give the screwdriver a quick tap before attempting to undo the screws (works best if the screwdriver has a shaft that goes all the way through the handle, otherwise don't go too hard in case the handle cracks). If the screwdriver has a square shaft or a hex profile near the handle then get a spanner on it to do the turning as this allows you to really lean into the handle to maximise grip on the screw head. (Obviously impact driver is great if you have one but don't think I have ever needed to use mine in years of old classic car disc changes - gets used for other stubborn stuff though)
Cheers.Ian
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coullstar
Österreich


Joined: 15 Sep 2015
Posts: 952
Location: Aberdeen/Torphins


PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2018 4:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Did this on Sat. Fairly straightforward but yes try get the screws out first and most liklely will need an impact driver.

Big allen socket to get caliper bolts out, think its 12mm.

Then caliper pin removal, as said potentially the worst bit.
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maldren
Imola


Joined: 07 Oct 2016
Posts: 769



PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2018 5:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not sure what you are using to knock out the pins but it really worth getting a Pin Punch (or set of them). Use the correct diameter punch and decent hammer (lump hammer?) and the pins should some out ok, even if they're old and corroded.

Put a light smear of copper grease on when replacing but not too much near the brakes!

If the pads don't push back easily they may just be sticking in the caliper but check the pistons are retracting freely, if not, get the calipers refurbished before they seize.
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2003 996.2 C2 Coupe Arctic Silver
 
  
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The return of Marty Wild
Österreich


Joined: 04 Nov 2016
Posts: 982



PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2018 10:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good luck, Rob. I did all 4 corners on the R32 without too much fuss. Have tins of brake cleaner, wire brushes to clean up as you go in order to maintain/improve the mechanics of the systems.

This stuff was very useful and I had no brake squeak after:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/i/261882004462

Do the Porkie calipers have some anti squeal shims or such like?
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wasz
Indianapolis


Joined: 28 Dec 2012
Posts: 2462


1999 Porsche 996 Carrera 2

PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2018 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My tips:

Try the disc retaining screw first.

Use a well fitting screwdriver.

As said smack it with a hammer a few times to loosen the corrosion before turning the screw.

Worst case: you drill the head off the screw and then unwind it with mole grips when the disc is off. Stainless replacements are on ebay.

The brake pad retaining pins: Go easy on them. If you use a punch and a hammer, then don't smack too hard. You can break the alloy caliper.

Instead, use mole grips to rotate the pin, use an old chisel to scrape the pin then turn a bit and keep going till you've scraped all around. Work it backwards and forwards and use some release oil.

WD40 is next to useless for penetrating corroded / stuck bolts yet it is always recommended for some reason on forums. Use Plus Gas instead: https://www.carparts4less.co.uk/cp4l/p/-/-/-/-/?549774741

I used a wire brush in a grinder to clean up the pin before putting back, a spray of zinc paint or similar will stop it rusting up again for a while. Or you can buy a new pin kit for about £50 front axle £25 rear.
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wasz
Indianapolis


Joined: 28 Dec 2012
Posts: 2462


1999 Porsche 996 Carrera 2

PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2018 11:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

oh yeah, mega cheap brake cleaner to clean your new discs off before fitting:

£1.98 delivered for a tin https://www.carparts4less.co.uk/cp4l/p/-/-/-/-/?NOR2897333500

Use code CP-475-YE to get 15% off cp4l
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maldren
Imola


Joined: 07 Oct 2016
Posts: 769



PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2018 12:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

wasz wrote:
WD40 is next to useless for penetrating corroded / stuck bolts yet it is always recommended for some reason on forums. Use Plus Gas instead: https://www.carparts4less.co.uk/cp4l/p/-/-/-/-/?549774741


Completely agree with Wasz

I'd say it's worse than useless, it's dangerous because it is a spray and it will get into places you don't want it on brakes.

Plus gas in the old fashioned 'dripper' type tin rather than a spray if you can get it, if not, be careful where it goes.
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2003 996.2 C2 Coupe Arctic Silver
 
  
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wasz
Indianapolis


Joined: 28 Dec 2012
Posts: 2462


1999 Porsche 996 Carrera 2

PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2018 1:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

maldren wrote:
wasz wrote:
WD40 is next to useless for penetrating corroded / stuck bolts yet it is always recommended for some reason on forums. Use Plus Gas instead: https://www.carparts4less.co.uk/cp4l/p/-/-/-/-/?549774741


Completely agree with Wasz

I'd say it's worse than useless, it's dangerous because it is a spray and it will get into places you don't want it on brakes.

Plus gas in the old fashioned 'dripper' type tin rather than a spray if you can get it, if not, be careful where it goes.


agreed! doesn't matter so much if you are changing discs AND pads, but otherwise you don't want oil on either.....
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911UK
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Joined: 15 May 2002
Posts: 9597
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1997 Porsche 993 Carrera 2

PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2018 2:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

wasz's top tips Thumb

for pads, here are some pics from a 996 GT3 http://911uk.com/viewtopic.php?t=69339 nothing that the squeel dampers werent changed
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Robertb
Long Beach


Joined: 01 Sep 2003
Posts: 6531
Location: South Oxfordshire

2002 Porsche 996 Carrera 4S

PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2018 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great suggestions and tips everyone, thank you! keep em coming...

I'll get some brake cleaner and Plus Gas.

I'm hoping the pins will be OK as the pads were changed not too long ago.
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Tobyone
Monza


Joined: 20 Jan 2018
Posts: 171
Location: Somewhere else


PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2018 9:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Clean everything first.
Take your time and have a plan.
YouTube can be really good.
Take a few photos on your phone to make sure all goes back together, incase you get brain fade. (easy on jobs you have not done before)
Use a correct size pin punch ( if it is to small it will either go on the piss and you will slip off it as you hit it or break)
decent quality tools that fit well on the fixings.
Clean and lube everything as you reassemble it.
Check everything.
Clean discs with a good cleaner.
Use a torque wrench on wheel nuts.
And enjoy it Smile
Don't touch anything in the house or your partner / housemate will kill you for black hand marks EVERYWHERE !! Wink
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bo_duke
Monza


Joined: 27 Jul 2014
Posts: 158



PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2018 11:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I did all 4 corners on my 996T about a year ago (same brakes?).
I wouldn’t have managed it without an impact driver for the brake disc screws, they are quite cheap nowadays, and I think it’s a no brainer.
I’d also buy a pad spreader. Less essential but again, cheap, and less chance of scoring pads or calliper paint.
For the pins, agree with all of the above re sanding off lumpy corrosion before trying to drive out. I started mine with a proper punch but only got it so far because the punch tip was tapered and got too thick to pass through the hole in the calliper. Hacksawed the tip off a 4 inch nail and used that to finish the job.
If you are changing the pads too, the OPCs replace the spring/pin/wear sensor and pad backing plates/anti squeal shims (which stick to the backs of the pads).
 
  
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Robertb
Long Beach


Joined: 01 Sep 2003
Posts: 6531
Location: South Oxfordshire

2002 Porsche 996 Carrera 4S

PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 2:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cheers for all the advice everyone, much appreciated. Will be having a go tomorrow.

Can anyone advise on torque setting for the caliper bolts?
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wasz
Indianapolis


Joined: 28 Dec 2012
Posts: 2462


1999 Porsche 996 Carrera 2

PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 3:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I do mine "tight enough"

Some say you should put new bolts in each time. Can be had from cp4l cheap.
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Robertb
Long Beach


Joined: 01 Sep 2003
Posts: 6531
Location: South Oxfordshire

2002 Porsche 996 Carrera 4S

PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2018 7:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Update...

Job went well... No hiccups at all. A technically-minded friend helped (a lot). We got the caliper off without needing to remove the pads (which are quite new), just slid it off over the disc, then wound the pads back with a clamp before refitting it over the new disc.

Anti-seize/penetrating oil was an inspired tip... gave the various bits a good squirt the evening before and the fasteners undid with no drama. Didn't even need my new-fandangled impact driver.

Did a front ARB drop link too, so that's three things off the MOT advisories (though the drop link seemed OK, if rather old looking... apparently 'slight play').

Cheers all thumbsup
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Tobyone
Monza


Joined: 20 Jan 2018
Posts: 171
Location: Somewhere else


PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2018 11:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Job done nice one.

Learnt stuff whilst you were at it Smile
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jerzybondov
Silverstone


Joined: 27 Apr 2015
Posts: 149



PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2018 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice work! How long did the job take in the end?
 
  
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