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MisterCorn
Long Beach


Joined: 08 Jan 2011
Posts: 6740
Location: Nottingham, England

2004 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2018 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Martin996RSR wrote:
It looks like you hae dry-break joints on the lines coming from the front shocks to the reservoirs, so does that mean you can mount them somewhere near the battery or in the frunk?


Yes, that is the plan. I'll figure out where and get some mountings made once the front struts are in.

I managed to confirm that the rear shock was the wrong one, so that has been swapped over and the other side fitted.



For the front struts I need to open up the top of the strut tower, so I've made up an aluminium template with the centre hole marked in it, in the hope that I can use this as a guide and get in with an 86mm holesaw.





MC
 
  
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Hertsdriver
Newbie


Joined: 12 Nov 2018
Posts: 36



PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2018 3:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

why do you need to open it up? is there not enough room to manouver it into place, put the hose through first then the fitting at an angle? it looks like it has the height to clear the edge of the hole once fitted.
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MisterCorn
Long Beach


Joined: 08 Jan 2011
Posts: 6740
Location: Nottingham, England

2004 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2018 3:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hertsdriver wrote:
why do you need to open it up? is there not enough room to manouver it into place, put the hose through first then the fitting at an angle? it looks like it has the height to clear the edge of the hole once fitted.


No it won't fit. I could have the dampers modified so that it would fit, however it would be impossible to get to the adjusters to tweak the camber/caster without unbolting and dropping the mounts.

MC
 
  
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Chief
Magny-Cours


Joined: 16 Sep 2010
Posts: 2710
Location: The Middle lands


PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2018 8:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Love it, just love it pal Thumb Bandit Bandit Bandit Bandit Bandit
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DynoMike
Albert Park


Joined: 25 May 2012
Posts: 1527
Location: The Cotswolds

2003 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2018 9:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some proper components being used here MC, good to see. Do you mind me asking what price the Exe-tc dampers were? (By PM if that is more appropriate).

Motorsport toe arms are on my radar too, Matt has already priced these up for me.

Keep up the good work Thumb
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2003 996 Turbo
Previous toy 1974 Mini 1000
 
  
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MisterCorn
Long Beach


Joined: 08 Jan 2011
Posts: 6740
Location: Nottingham, England

2004 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2018 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DynoMike wrote:
Some proper components being used here MC, good to see. Do you mind me asking what price the Exe-tc dampers were? (By PM if that is more appropriate).

Motorsport toe arms are on my radar too, Matt has already priced these up for me.

Keep up the good work Thumb


Neil has emailled you about a hopeful get together soon on the engine work, I'll fill you in when I see you. Matt sourced the toe arms.

MC
 
  
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DynoMike
Albert Park


Joined: 25 May 2012
Posts: 1527
Location: The Cotswolds

2003 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2018 10:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MisterCorn wrote:


Neil has emailled you about a hopeful get together soon on the engine work, I'll fill you in when I see you. Matt sourced the toe arms.

MC


Look forward to seeing you both.

Mike.
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2003 996 Turbo
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MisterCorn
Long Beach


Joined: 08 Jan 2011
Posts: 6740
Location: Nottingham, England

2004 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2018 12:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wiring finished off.

From this.


To this.



Then bolted back in place.


There is one unattached wire. It is for the sounder for the tracker. Which I don't intend to fit but have left there in case I change my mind.

MC
 
  
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MisterCorn
Long Beach


Joined: 08 Jan 2011
Posts: 6740
Location: Nottingham, England

2004 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2018 5:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The front strut towers need opening up to enable access to the caster/camber adjustments on the front top mounts. To do this I got a piece of scrap aluminium and put holes in in the top mount locations for 8mm bolts and drilled a 1/4" hole in what is the centre of the adjusters. This was then bolted to the car to act as a guide for the hole saw.

Plate in place and area masked up to keep the metal shaving mess to a minimum.







I used a bit of oil to lubricate it, I needed to take it slowly as this is an 80mm holesaw and didn't want it to overheat.

Time to take a brave pill and drill the chassis.

Trial fit after drilling and cleaning up the edges.





Then move on to the other side.





The edge are deburred and cleaned and I'll finish smoothing them off tomorrow before they get a coating of POR15 for protection.

This is how much material was removed.



MC
 
  
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Ghianightmare
Spa-Francorchamps


Joined: 25 Apr 2017
Posts: 262
Location: Dublin


PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2018 7:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice neat job. Good housekeeping with the plastic.

Will you roll the edges at all to restore some strength?
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MisterCorn
Long Beach


Joined: 08 Jan 2011
Posts: 6740
Location: Nottingham, England

2004 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2018 7:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ghianightmare wrote:
Nice neat job. Good housekeeping with the plastic.

Will you roll the edges at all to restore some strength?


No. I don't think it will make any difference as they are mostly vertical anyway, so the strength around the base is still there. Besides, I don't see how I could do it easily and neatly. I might put a brace on top to clamp the strut top.

MC
 
  
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deMort
Long Beach


Joined: 21 Mar 2015
Posts: 6171
Location: Brighton


PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2018 8:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MC .. can i just say .. this would scare the crap outa me if it was a booked in job .. fair play there young man .

Wiring .. i know its what you do but hats off there .. impressive !

ill carry on Lurking Smile
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infrasilver
Fast & Furious
Fast & Furious


Joined: 04 Oct 2010
Posts: 8143
Location: East Midlands

2001 Porsche 996 Targa

PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2018 11:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MisterCorn wrote:
Ghianightmare wrote:
Nice neat job. Good housekeeping with the plastic.

Will you roll the edges at all to restore some strength?


No. I don't think it will make any difference as they are mostly vertical anyway, so the strength around the base is still there. Besides, I don't see how I could do it easily and neatly. I might put a brace on top to clamp the strut top.

MC


The top mounting on the strut will help keep most of its rigidity but I would still like more strength in there with some kind of donut on top, the shape of the strut tower doesn't lend itself well to this idea though.

A strut brace may be useful if you can get it to go around your pipework.
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MisterCorn
Long Beach


Joined: 08 Jan 2011
Posts: 6740
Location: Nottingham, England

2004 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 6:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have looked at all the strut braces I can find for the 996 but I don't like any of them. Due to the battery position they all lift up very high and so don't look very strong. However with my battery being much lower there is room to run something in a more sensible position. What I would like to do is make up a front strut brace which would pick up on all three of the suspension top mount points as well as on the two mounts for the standard front brace, to tie up the whole front end. It would go somewhere like this:



I'm not suggesting it is made with a balance pipe from an E46 M3 though.

I hold fire on doing anything until the front end of the car is back together and I can see which pipes go where. no rush.

MC
 
  
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Martin996RSR
Spa-Francorchamps


Joined: 08 Dec 2016
Posts: 305



PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is plenty of metal both fore and aft of the strut top mounting points, a strut brace would be putting a hat on a hat.

The flex in the 996 chassis comes from a lack of rigidity between the A and B pillars. You can solve for that with a cage that ties into more than just the floor, i.e. somewhere on both the A and B pillars too.
 
  
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Clanky
Österreich


Joined: 24 Aug 2012
Posts: 933
Location: Scotland

2007 Porsche 997 Turbo

PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 10:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just found this thread, & it's looking like something I'd love to do myself at some point... If only 996 4 s's would drop to a decent (cheap) price point...
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MisterCorn
Long Beach


Joined: 08 Jan 2011
Posts: 6740
Location: Nottingham, England

2004 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 10:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Martin996RSR wrote:
There is plenty of metal both fore and aft of the strut top mounting points, a strut brace would be putting a hat on a hat.

The flex in the 996 chassis comes from a lack of rigidity between the A and B pillars. You can solve for that with a cage that ties into more than just the floor, i.e. somewhere on both the A and B pillars too.


The cage that I am using is the safety devices on, it ties on to the rear suspension mounts and the floor at the front of the seats, as well as the floor at the front of the car. I will look to see what can be done to tie it in to the two pillars when I get to that points. Thanks for the tip Smile


I have decided to copy what Richard did on his CLR project and remove the sound insulation from the rear of the car and cover the rear shelf in alcantara. First job is to remove the insulation. I've read a few ways of doing this, either heating it up or cooling it down. It sounds like the heating method produces a right mess so I decided to attack it with some circuit freezer spray and a strong trim removal tool and mallet. I got about this far in a little over 10 minutes but now need more spray.



MC
 
  
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MisterCorn
Long Beach


Joined: 08 Jan 2011
Posts: 6740
Location: Nottingham, England

2004 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 4:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Exposed areas at the strut tower top cleaned up and treated with two coats of POR15 before the strut goes in.





Wiring for the PSE znd centre radiator temperature sensor routed over the top of the inner arch and through to the engine bay through tge large grommet at the rear.



MC
 
  
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MisterCorn
Long Beach


Joined: 08 Jan 2011
Posts: 6740
Location: Nottingham, England

2004 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 6:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is a quick note on the brakes. Standard brakes for Carrera 4 996 are as follows.

Front disk, 318mm diameter, effective diameter 261.8mm
Rear disk, 299mm diameter, effective diameter 247.6mm

Front calipers use 36 and 40mm pistons. Area 2275mm^2
Rear calipers use 28 and 30mm pistons. Area 1323mm^2

Multiplying piston area by effective diameter gives the following forces and ratios.

Front. 2275x261.8 = 585595
Rear. 1323x247.6 = 327575
Front to back ratio of 1.82:1

New brakes are Cayenne turbo front calipers, 996 turbo rear calipers. 997 GT3 disks front and rear. Turbo calipers are required for the thicker disk for the GT3. Scaling up from the standard ones as I couldn't find figures for effective diameters gives.

Front disk, 350mm diameter, effective diameter 288mm
Rear disk, 350mm diameter, effective diameter 290mm

Front calipers use 30,34,40mm pistons. Area 2749mm^2
Rear calipers use 28 and 30mm pistons. Area 1323mm^2

Front. 2749x288 = 791712
Rear. 1323x290 = 383670
Front to back ratio of 2.06:1

So the new brakes have a slightly higher front bias.

Ratio of piston areas on new to old is 1.13:1
Old master cylinder is 23.81mm, new is 27mm. So 1.28x more area.
The new master cylinder will push more fluid than is needed.

The GT3 6 piston calipers uses smaller pistons at 28,32,34mm. Using these on the front would have given a more rearward brake bias of 1.75:1

There is a presure reducing valve fitted to the rear which there might be some leeway for tweaking or fitting different version from another car, but I haven't investigated yet. I will see how the slightly increased front bias affects the car first.

MC
 
  
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ragpicker
Estoril


Joined: 14 Apr 2013
Posts: 3914
Location: North East England


PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 7:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not helpful but I look at the front callipers on my Cayenne turbo and think they are absolutely massive! Waaaay too much for a 911, but then again you can't ever have big enough brakes can you?!
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