Welcome to 911UK
The only place for Porsche, 911uk is the definitive enthusiast and resource site for the Porsche 911.
Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free, so join up today for full access to the site and benefit from latest member offers.

Porsche Classifieds
Porsche Buyers Guides
Sell Your Porsche on 911uk
Create a Free Classified Advert
Search Ads
Classified Adverts FAQ
Trade Classified Information
Buyer & Seller Fraud Protection
Consumer Rights Act
Pre Purchase Inspection (PPI)
Porsche Car Sourcing
Porsche Cars Wanted
Official Porsche Centre Reviews
Model
Stock
Porsche 911
991 : 2011- 23
997 : 2004- 84
996 : 1997-2005 45
993 : 1993-1998 6
964 : 1989-1993 3
Carrera 3.2 : 1983-1989 0
Carrera SC : 1977-1983 2
930 Turbo : 1975-1989 0
Early 911 : 1964-1977 3
Porsche Other Models
Classic : 1950-1965 0
Boxster : 1997- 19
Cayman : 2005- 12
Cayenne : 2003- 6
Macan : 2014- 1
Panamera : 2009- 1
912-914-924-928-944-968 0
959 - CarreraGT - RaceCar 1
Car Parts For Sale & Wanted
Other Items For Sale & Wanted
Wheels Tyres For Sale & Wanted
Number Plates For Sale Wanted

Porsche Services
Porsche Body Shop Repair
Paint Protection & Wrapping
Porsche Classic Insurance
Porsche Classic Parts
Porsche Classic Restoration
Porsche Design Collection
Porsche Engine Gearbox Rebuild
Porsche Heritage & History
Porsche News
Porsche Picture Gallery
Win a New Porsche 911

Porsche Parts
Body Parts, Body Styling
Brakes, Clearance
Electrical, Exhausts
Engine Cooling, Engine Electrical
Engine Rebuild, Heating Cooling
Interior Incar, Lighting
Rubber Seals, Service Parts
Steering, Suspension
Transmission, Workshop Tools
Early 911, 911 - 930, 928 - 968
964 - 993, 996 - 997, Boxster
Cayman, Cayenne, Panamera

Porsche Model Range
911 [991] 2011-Current
Porsche 911 [991]
911 [997] 2004-Current
Porsche 911 [997]
911 [GT] GT1-GT2-GT3
Porsche 911 [GT]
911 [996] 1997-2005
Porsche 911 [996]
911 [993] 1993-1998
Porsche 911 [993]
911 [RS] RS-RSR
Porsche 911 [RS]
911 [964] 1989-1993
Porsche 911 [964]
911 3.2 1983-1989
Porsche 911 3.2 Carrera
911 SC 1977-1983
Porsche 911 SC
911 [Early] 1964-1977
Porsche 911 [Early]
Boxster & Cayman
Porsche Boxster & Cayman
Cayenne & Panamera
Porsche Cayenne & Panamera

911uk Site Partners

Post new topic   Reply to topic
Author Message
ELA
Barcelona


Joined: 30 Aug 2011
Posts: 1267
Location: Nurburgring Doorstep


PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 5:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds an absolute weapon that H, many thanks for taking the time to post all the gory details here.
I wonder why a remote filter was fitted, it's not as though the stock position is difficult to reach.
_________________
CLR996 1086kg bespoke design
 
  
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
   
Marky911
Albert Park


Joined: 04 Jun 2009
Posts: 1725



PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 8:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As already said what an absolute beast. Gorgeous car.

I maybe be wrong but does the oil filter need to be relocated due to that airbox?

Stunning car. I miss my old one sooo much. nooo
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
Roro
Long Beach


Joined: 01 Oct 2010
Posts: 6190



PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2017 6:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Super read, nicely written and what a fantastic beast. Looking forward to the next instalment Thumb
_________________
2007 997.1 GT3
2017 F87 M2
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
Dammit
Albert Park


Joined: 23 Sep 2016
Posts: 1731



PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2018 11:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Could someone please tell me who built this car?
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
NXI20
Paul Ricard


Joined: 02 Feb 2008
Posts: 3316
Location: South Bucks

2004 Porsche 996 GT3 Mk2

PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2018 11:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Richard Chamberlain at

https://www.ctrdevelopments.com/
_________________
Nick

2004 GT3 CS in Atlas Grey with too many mods to list!
1995 993 GT2 recreation in Polar Silver
2010 GT3 CS in Riviera Blue Smile
1978 Carrera SC Barn Find in Red (restoration project)
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
Dammit
Albert Park


Joined: 23 Sep 2016
Posts: 1731



PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2018 12:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks!
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
JarmoL
Newbie


Joined: 16 Oct 2011
Posts: 30



PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2018 7:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is some fantastic build. I'd love to have engine like that in my car. Thumb

I wonder about longevity of these big displacement builds though. Can it ever be equal to stockish 3.6? Dont know

Any idea how many miles now on this particular build?
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
NXI20
Paul Ricard


Joined: 02 Feb 2008
Posts: 3316
Location: South Bucks

2004 Porsche 996 GT3 Mk2

PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2018 7:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It’s got 4500 miles on it now. Just been taken out to have the valve clearances checked. Leakdown test results are decent so it’s going back in to be thrashed a bit more Wink
_________________
Nick

2004 GT3 CS in Atlas Grey with too many mods to list!
1995 993 GT2 recreation in Polar Silver
2010 GT3 CS in Riviera Blue Smile
1978 Carrera SC Barn Find in Red (restoration project)
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
DynoMike
Barcelona


Joined: 25 May 2012
Posts: 1455
Location: The Cotswolds

2003 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2018 7:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

NXI20 wrote:
It’s got 4500 miles on it now. Just been taken out to have the valve clearances checked. Leakdown test results are decent so it’s going back in to be thrashed a bit more Wink


So they have gone the mechanical cam route and ditched the hydraulics then, no wonder it goes so well.
_________________
2003 996 Turbo
Previous toy 1974 Mini 1000
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
NXI20
Paul Ricard


Joined: 02 Feb 2008
Posts: 3316
Location: South Bucks

2004 Porsche 996 GT3 Mk2

PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2018 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Never going to rev to 9000 RPM on hydraulic lifters but I’m not convinced it’s worth the hassle of having to gap check the thing every 4500 miles.
_________________
Nick

2004 GT3 CS in Atlas Grey with too many mods to list!
1995 993 GT2 recreation in Polar Silver
2010 GT3 CS in Riviera Blue Smile
1978 Carrera SC Barn Find in Red (restoration project)
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
DynoMike
Barcelona


Joined: 25 May 2012
Posts: 1455
Location: The Cotswolds

2003 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The motor should go well past that mileage before needing adjustment, Nick, some of the bikes are checked at 30000 miles, despite revving to 14000+ rpm. 4500 seems to be needlessly early, assuming that on the road, a motor can never be used as hard as on track.
_________________
2003 996 Turbo
Previous toy 1974 Mini 1000
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
NXI20
Paul Ricard


Joined: 02 Feb 2008
Posts: 3316
Location: South Bucks

2004 Porsche 996 GT3 Mk2

PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2018 7:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I believe that's what the engine builder recommended - probably erring on the side of caution (not a bad thing given what could happen if they do go out of spec!). Of course, the GT3 valves / springs are considerably heavier than the ones in a bike so I'd guess that's also a factor. Even on the standard engine, the springs are very close to being coil-bound on full lift.
_________________
Nick

2004 GT3 CS in Atlas Grey with too many mods to list!
1995 993 GT2 recreation in Polar Silver
2010 GT3 CS in Riviera Blue Smile
1978 Carrera SC Barn Find in Red (restoration project)
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
Cheburator
Trainee


Joined: 15 Aug 2014
Posts: 90



PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 11:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

NXI20 wrote:
I believe that's what the engine builder recommended - probably erring on the side of caution (not a bad thing given what could happen if they do go out of spec!). Of course, the GT3 valves / springs are considerably heavier than the ones in a bike so I'd guess that's also a factor. Even on the standard engine, the springs are very close to being coil-bound on full lift.


Next time I race with Richard I would ask about that. Sounds wrong - the S54B32 as found in the BMW M3 of 15yrs ago has a tappet adjustment interval of 30k miles on the Street cars. In stock form it revs to 8000rpm, while in race trim it revs to 9000rpm...
_________________
Porsche 996.1 GT3 CS K400
Porsche 928 GTS 5-spd
Porsche 944 Turbo Cup race car
Porsche 928 Cup race car
Various BMWs
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
Slippydiff
Monza


Joined: 22 Nov 2007
Posts: 205



PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 6:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cheburator wrote:
NXI20 wrote:
I believe that's what the engine builder recommended - probably erring on the side of caution (not a bad thing given what could happen if they do go out of spec!). Of course, the GT3 valves / springs are considerably heavier than the ones in a bike so I'd guess that's also a factor. Even on the standard engine, the springs are very close to being coil-bound on full lift.


Next time I race with Richard I would ask about that. Sounds wrong - the S54B32 as found in the BMW M3 of 15yrs ago has a tappet adjustment interval of 30k miles on the Street cars. In stock form it revs to 8000rpm, while in race trim it revs to 9000rpm...


I believe Richard was being cautious in this recommendation. That the clearances needed adjusting wasn’t cast in stone, but merely his recommendation to keep an eye on things such as maximum revs used, cylinder leakage, and the valve clearances.
But another Porsche indy who’s run 996 GT3 R race cars (and yes it is relevant in this instance) was also adamant the clearances on this engine should be checked and adjusted if necessary.
Bearing in mind the build cost, the above suggestions sound pragmatic.
As for your example of the BMW M3 engine, I think the specific output/maximum rpm of an engine has little to do with it’s valvetrain durability and longevity.
I’m sure Mike will confirm that valve train wear has far more to do with cam lift and duration, with as Nick has said the weight of the components within the valve train, those being the valves, retaining collars and rockers etc also being a major factor.
(but the above are only my thoughts, and thus they’re not gospel...) Smile
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
DynoMike
Barcelona


Joined: 25 May 2012
Posts: 1455
Location: The Cotswolds

2003 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Slippydiff wrote:
Cheburator wrote:
NXI20 wrote:
I believe that's what the engine builder recommended - probably erring on the side of caution (not a bad thing given what could happen if they do go out of spec!). Of course, the GT3 valves / springs are considerably heavier than the ones in a bike so I'd guess that's also a factor. Even on the standard engine, the springs are very close to being coil-bound on full lift.


Next time I race with Richard I would ask about that. Sounds wrong - the S54B32 as found in the BMW M3 of 15yrs ago has a tappet adjustment interval of 30k miles on the Street cars. In stock form it revs to 8000rpm, while in race trim it revs to 9000rpm...


I believe Richard was being cautious in this recommendation. That the clearances needed adjusting wasn’t cast in stone, but merely his recommendation to keep an eye on things such as maximum revs used, cylinder leakage, and the valve clearances.
But another Porsche indy who’s run 996 GT3 R race cars (and yes it is relevant in this instance) was also adamant the clearances on this engine should be checked and adjusted if necessary.
Bearing in mind the build cost, the above suggestions sound pragmatic.
As for your example of the BMW M3 engine, I think the specific output/maximum rpm of an engine has little to do with it’s valvetrain durability and longevity.
I’m sure Mike will confirm that valve train wear has far more to do with cam lift and duration, with as Nick has said the weight of the components within the valve train, those being the valves, retaining collars and rockers etc also being a major factor.
(but the above are only my thoughts, and thus they’re not gospel...) Smile


Hi Slippy. There are many factors which need to be borne in mind here, principally the design of the ramps at either end of the cam flanks. These serve the purpose of preparing the valve for lift by decreasing the tappet clearance just prior to the actual lift profile becoming active.

Of more interest is the closing flank of the lobe and its attendant 'closing ramp', which dictates the velocity at which the valve is re-seated. If this engine runs titanium valves and beryllium-copper valve seats (possible?), they need to have a bespoke closing ramp to avoid pounding the seats out. A well designed ramp will gently seat the valve, without adding excess duration to the profile. As an analogy, it is akin to feathering the brakes just before a dead stop is reached after some hard braking, thus avoiding the dreaded kick-back due to an instantaneous velocity change.

If the engine still runs steel valves and standard seats, the mileage at which they should be checked depends largely on the duty cycle of the engine (the amount of time it spends at WOT, basically), which on a road engine is in single figure percentages. A cup car will likely experience a 45% duty cycle, so typically 8-9 times the road car's. This was why I suggested it should run longer than 100 hours between checks, but Richard was probably wanting to get them checked in order to get a feel for the valve train when running under road conditions, rather than race conditions.

The mass of the components should always be factored into the profile design, along with a properly designed valve spring. When properly matched, the inspection intervals should be relatively light.

One odd phenomenon can take place with engines that see sporadic use; the clearances can increase due to carbon lifting off the backs of the valve heads , (as a result of moisture being present in the atmosphere), which then drops onto the valve seats, increasing the tappet clearance. Generally, clearances tend to close up rather than increase, but this is one exception to that 'rule'.

I would imagine that if Richard finds that there is no change at a all in the clearances, along with minimal cylinder leakage, he will be happy for the motor to go for a longer period before inspecting them again. I get where he is coming from, I built a hillclimb motor in 2010, which due to the short run times, I had no idea of the point at which it needed checking. Fast forward to 2017, the motor came in for a freshen up, all the valve clearances were as the day it left the workshop, despite having its neck wrung at 9300 rpm for the last 5 years at least. That engine should now run happily for the next 7 seasons or so, but the valve train was a total unknown when it was built, in terms of longevity.
_________________
2003 996 Turbo
Previous toy 1974 Mini 1000
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
Cheburator
Trainee


Joined: 15 Aug 2014
Posts: 90



PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 4:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Slippydiff wrote:


As for your example of the BMW M3 engine, I think the specific output/maximum rpm of an engine has little to do with it’s valvetrain durability and longevity.
(but the above are only my thoughts, and thus they’re not gospel...) Smile


The reason I used the M3 is that physically the dimensions of the valve train components are very similar to the ones found in the GT3. It is simple physics after all. The only major difference is that the M3 uses rockers while the Mezger doesn't. As to what causes valve train wear/problems - well aware of the causes/problems, given that I tend to build my own historic watercooled race engines with somewhat modified valve trains Mr. Green
_________________
Porsche 996.1 GT3 CS K400
Porsche 928 GTS 5-spd
Porsche 944 Turbo Cup race car
Porsche 928 Cup race car
Various BMWs
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
Geo
Newbie


Joined: 29 Oct 2012
Posts: 5



PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2018 9:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What a machine! Quality engineering and good taste in spades!

Thanks SlippyDiff for the write up, I really enjoyed reading it!

Interested what sort of spring rates these JRZ's run with.... Very Happy
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
NXI20
Paul Ricard


Joined: 02 Feb 2008
Posts: 3316
Location: South Bucks

2004 Porsche 996 GT3 Mk2

PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2018 9:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Proprietary info Hand
_________________
Nick

2004 GT3 CS in Atlas Grey with too many mods to list!
1995 993 GT2 recreation in Polar Silver
2010 GT3 CS in Riviera Blue Smile
1978 Carrera SC Barn Find in Red (restoration project)
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
Slippydiff
Monza


Joined: 22 Nov 2007
Posts: 205



PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2018 1:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Apologies for the lengthy delay in updating this thread. Firstly I've found myself embroiled with a ladeeee since the end of July, that's meant I've spent far less in front of my PC, let alone having the time to write further reviews on this amazing 996 ....

But what really brought a halt to proceedings was my dear mother falling and fracturing her hip on November 19th. Though the operation to repair the fractured hip went well, she subsequently contracted sepsis ten days later and fell seriously ill.

My sister I and feared for her life, so much so that I stayed with her overnight on the Thursday 30th November.

Large hospitals are strangely surreal places in the early hours of the morning, with only occasion whispers from members of staff checking BP, oxygen sats etc, or offering kindly cups of tea, coffee or sandwiches to break the long periods of silence. But periodically the tranquility is shattered by elderly patients crying or screaming out for help, all of which I found deeply unsettling when your nearest and dearest is critically ill and trying to rest..

Sleep wasn't an option, so I tried to pass the time bringing this review up to date, but also thought it a good way to take my mind off the inevitable.
My dear mother passed away shortly before midnight two days later on Saturday 2nd December aged 90.

In the best tradition of the English stiff upper lip mentality, onwards and upwards, life must go on ! ! Do please enjoy :

It's 3.30am on a fine Sunday morning in early September, and another pre-dawn alarm call urgently wakes me from my slumber.

Now I'd like to say the exciting thought of a stint behind the wheel of this finely honed Mk1 996 GT3 was the reason for my waking so early, but it wasn't. This early morning alarm call came courtesy of some poorly stored or cooked chicken from a well known Italian chain of high street restaurants. If you'd like to know which one, just PM me and ASK....

So with the world having fallen out of my bottom Grin I grabbed another two hours sleep before getting up, showering and once again heading up to fine roads of N.Wales to test this phenomenal exercise in 996 GT3 honing.

Apologies for the hopeless images, they were taken in the shade and my iPhone 5S really isn't up to the job Get Me Coat







Same location, far more talented photographer/better camera ...



The new owner has had the car three months now, and in that time has clocked up a good few miles.
Having passengered him on 3-4 occasions, it became clear he'd mastered the throttle response and clutch operation to the point he made driving the car look easy .......

So with the first leg of the route out to our usual breakfast stop complete and a hearty full English consumed, the new owner handed the key to me and says "it's you're turn now" .....

I tend to be pretty generous when it comes to sharing cars (with the caveat I need to feel the recipient of the keys is sensible, mechanically sympathetic, knowledgeable, can "drive" and understands what they're about to drive) and knowing the owner of this car gets emotionally attached to his cars, I felt incredibly privileged to given the opportunity to drive his truly unique and stunning car.

I'd taken the time to watch and study him driving the car (and as said previously, he made it look easy ! !) so what came next was a bit of a shock.

The car has a Cup flyweight flywheel (think 964/993 RS, Mk 1 996 GT3 Clubsport, then remove three kilos more... !!!) the flywheel in itself isn't a problem (I've owned all the above fitted with LWT flywheels) No, what made the process genuinely tricky was the unsprung paddle clutch ie a full race unit more at home in a race, sprint, rally or rallycross car .

A paddle clutch has one function, that being to transmit the engine's power as efficiently as possible without any slippage. Period. In reality that means they're not designed for road use or in traffic. They are effectively in or out, and very switch like.

They can be made to last on the road by avoiding riding the clutch when setting off or changing gear, but they're primarily designed for race circuit/rally stage use.

So that was the first hurdle to overcome, the next was equally tricky.

As I've mentioned before, this car runs some very trick, custom throttle bodies and a Motec management system (not to mention the exquisite carbon airbox pictured) As with most throttle body installs, this one was utilised primarily to liberate additional horsepower and ensure the magical 500hp brief was met. And whilst the throttle bodies are an important part of what is a symbiotic blend of parts (heads, cams, exhaust, engine capacity, and induction/management) they, long duration, high lift cams and large inlet/exhaust ports aren't the perfect solution for a road going car.

So whilst this engine and its driveability were perfected after many hours on an engine dyno (not a rolling road) the throttle response low down in the rev range, sub 2k rpm, still isn't perfect.

Pair the clutch with this less than progressive low down throttle response AND the flyweight Cup flywheel/clutch assembly and things start to get "interesting" especially for an individual as inept as my good self Grin (actually I once owned an ex Prodrive Impreza WRC car, the second car they built after the one they'd built for the late, great Colin McRae) and that was actually easier to drive once you'd mastered the straight cut 'dog 'box ! ! !

But I digress, I wimped out and asked the owner to extract the car from it's parking space at our breakfast stop Hand and once clear of prying eyes, I took to the drivers seat Mr. Green

The gearbox is fitted with Cup cables and a 996 Cup shift assembly. Forget all the other short shift kits on the market (well except the superb and pricey Manthey billet shift assembly) this is THE best 996 shift you'll find, crisp and accurate whilst maintaining sensible throws AND weights. Added to which those peeking through the windows into the interior of the car won't think it's owned/driven by a complete boy racer, unlike the abominations from the likes of Numeric ....

The gearbox itself is a trick item, possibly a 2000 GT3 R or 2001 GT3 RS item (TBC) fitted with a Guard Transmissions (GT) billet LSD and probably a 8/32 crownwheel and pinion (TBC) and an external, front mounted oil cooler. Irrespective of its lineage, it transmits 500 NA horsepower to the Tarmac very, very efficiently indeed.

With each passing mile the JRZ dampers have become more compliant, and this along with the myriad rose jointed toe arms, castor arms and track control arms makes for the best handling 996 GT3 chassis I've ever driven. The suspension geo has been tweaked by danny at Unit11 and on Cup 2's in the dry the car goes where it's pointed, end of.

The finely crafted inconel and titanium exhaust is as quiet, if not quieter, than the standard exhaust, such was the previous owners insistence the car should pass every circuit's noise test. For a brief glimpse of the beautifully crafted masterpiece, watch this video at 27 seconds :

https://youtu.be/b6IQs4rEDw8

When cruising, the intake noise, the mechanical sound of the engine and the transmission (courtesy of the Cup gearchange cables) are more prevalent than any exhaust noise. But don't be thinking this is tiresome overly noisy car to drive, it isn't. Actually that's not true, the noisiest aspect of this car (apart form the induction noise) is those bloody Endless brake pads !! which squeal in protest every time they're used. And whilst there's no doubting their bite, nor indeed their ability to haul the car down from massive speeds with ease, time after time, they are ridiculously noisy.

But the ultra lightweight flywheel (and clutch) also impact steady state cruising on low throttle openings, the lack of any meaningful flywheel effect, means the the engine can fall off the cam and when it does so, it can get histrionic. It's straightforward enough to address though, you change down a gear and get the engine revs raised so it's back on the cam. It could be seen as downside, or you can view it as I did, that being it just adds to the car's incredible character.

I should add the owner has since carried out one modification to the car over the Winter (this review is based on my experience of driving the car early in September last year remember) and it has drastically changed the the drivability of the car to a degree you wouldn't think possible. But I'll update this thread with another driving review shortly (I promise it won't be another 6 months next time !!)

More to follow ….
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
DynoMike
Barcelona


Joined: 25 May 2012
Posts: 1455
Location: The Cotswolds

2003 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2018 7:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Slippy, firstly may I say sorry to hear about your Mum, that can't have been easy for you and any other family members.

Secondly, I can sympathise with you finding a hospital ward to be a lonely, often scary place, having had a fifty one week spell myself back in 1989. The experience was quite sobering at times, but as you've said, it can give you copious time in which to think - very glad your mind wandered to Zanzibar again!

Thirdly, another great write up! worship It's funny, the boys at Center Gravity really rate the 996 platform over both previous and later versions, along with said platform's build quality versus the 997 generation. That opinion was from both Chris and Pete, and it certainly sounds like your friend's car is pretty well resolved.

One thing that may help the drivability is to convert it back to drive by wire (if it is indeed cable operated at present?), in order to soften the pedal/throttle progression. There are several ways to achieve this via a remote actuator, which then opens the throttle bodies. Failing that, a cam throttle works wonders, we have to do the same on the 2 litre V8 hillclimb motors as they are ferocious little blighters when on 1:1 Mr. Green

Will the beast be gracing any tracks this year? Would be great to see it in action. Keep up the reports as and when you have driven it again.
_________________
2003 996 Turbo
Previous toy 1974 Mini 1000
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic   All times are GMT - 12 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Page 2 of 4

 
Jump to:  

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum
You cannot post calendar events in this forum