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sje00
Newbie


Joined: 08 Jun 2017
Posts: 32
Location: Herts


PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 12:43 am    Post subject: 996 C2 Geometry Reply with quote

Looking to do the Geometry on my 2000 996 C2.
I've heard about people applying the GT3 settings, car will be fast road and some track use.

Does anybody have settings for the Geometry for me to use??

Cheers
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ELA
Suzuka


Joined: 30 Aug 2011
Posts: 1153
Location: Nurburgring Doorstep


PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 6:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For a car intended for both road and track applications I'd look at going neutral toe, stick with stock castor (8.0 from memory) and 1'45 neg camber front and rear with as much extra track as you can get away with and perhaps a little rake angle (drop the front slightly more than the rear).
I have found the above settings work very well.
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cheshire911
Paul Ricard


Joined: 10 Jun 2012
Posts: 3400



PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 7:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The go-to people for advice and having this work carried out are Center Gravity in Atherstone, Warwickshire. Contact gia their website or leave a phone message. Used them myself and recommendation based on personal experience.
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Jamesx19
Monza


Joined: 10 Jul 2015
Posts: 190
Location: Brighton


PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi sje00,

Based on my experience of my 996 C2, and hearing stories from others such as DynoMike, I'd say that the 996 is very sensitive to what I assumed were small adjustments in geometry.

I first tried a Factory adjustment for X74 (My car is on H&R lowering springs which decrease ride height by 30mm all round) but with more front neg. camber. Which was 50' neg Camber at the front and 1 deg 40' rear. The toe was standard, so 5 ' toe in front and 10' toe in rear.

The car felt good, and when really laying power down after the apex of a corner, I could feel the car going from a slightly understeer to oversteer balance which feels really nice.
However I felt that it was slightly slow to turn in, and the car was a bit too "stable and steady" for my liking, also, the inside edges of the rear tyres were wearing fast.

Second try, working with 9Excellence in Horley, I discussed with them what I'd like to try.

I've gone with the maximum neg camber I could achieve on the front using the slotted top mount holes and standard control arms my car is fitted with.

Front is now 1 deg 22' neg Camber. Rear is 1 deg 20' neg Camber. 9E advised that they wouldn't put less neg camber on the rear. The toe angles are as before....

The car is Soooo much more pointy and eager to turn in. I like this, and the car as a whole feels smaller and more agile on the road. Rear tyre wear is improved, but I feels I may have lost a little of the under to oversteer balance that I enjoyed before, so may eventually dial a bit more rear neg camber back in..... say 1 deg 30'?

The point I think is that:

1.) The car, if all the suspension is in good nick (I've replaced pretty much everything) appear very sensitive to small adjustments.

2.) I think that (as ELA has found as well) more Front neg camber is a lovely thing, but individual drivers will have distinct preferences and not all agree

3.) My car is only used on the road. Track settings will be different again

4.) Using a good specialist such as Centre Gravity, if you can get there will be a good idea, and ultimately save you money in the long run I reckon. However, there are lots of other good independent specialists that will do a good job based on their experiences too.

Good luck
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Martin996RSR
Silverstone


Joined: 08 Dec 2016
Posts: 100



PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are several things you should bear in mind when selecting settings:

1. Can you put up with the uneven tyre wear and short tyre life that significant negative camber brings?
2. What profile tyres are you using? Higher profile tyres such as what you would use with a 17" rim can use a lot more negative camber than a low profile tyre because of the amount of give in the sidewall.
3. Straight line braking performance will be degraded by adding negative camber. There isn't a lot of weight on the front wheels of a 996 to start with. If you have hard suspension and low profile tyres, you're limiting the amount of weight transfer possible to the front wheels under braking. Adding negative camber to that cocktail means your available contact patch is also reduced.

People seem to believe that lots of negative camber is a good thing. It is only a good thing if it complements the rest of the suspension & tyres. If you over do it you'll make things worse. If you have typical 996 on 18" rims then reduce the toe to a minimum as per ELA's suggestion as it's this that governs how 'pointy' the car feels. I would consider reducing your camber to -1 degree all around. I think ELA uses 17" wheels on his car (because he's a bit of a genius when it comes to creating the best possible 996 and 17s give a better ride and better handling through being lighter) and I'd bet my bottom dollar that if he used lower profile tyres he too would run less negative camber.
 
  
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cheshire911
Paul Ricard


Joined: 10 Jun 2012
Posts: 3400



PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 11:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Before you go down the route of altering settings, it is worthwhile checking all the steering and suspension components for wear as otherwise there is little to be gained from tampering with settings.
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sje00
Newbie


Joined: 08 Jun 2017
Posts: 32
Location: Herts


PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 3:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cheshire911 wrote:
Before you go down the route of altering settings, it is worthwhile checking all the steering and suspension components for wear as otherwise there is little to be gained from tampering with settings.


Yes very true, that is part of the plan! 😉
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