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hopeydaze
Newbie


Joined: 06 Jan 2012
Posts: 44
Location: Wargrave, Berkshire, UK


PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

87 3.2 Carrera
then a long gap

996 C4S
996 Turbo
996.2 GT3 Comfort
997.1 GT3 Clubsport
 
  
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Stuart Mackay
Monza


Joined: 29 Apr 2013
Posts: 151
Location: Swaffham, Norfolk and Good


PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 9:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

65 Lotus Cortina (as first car)
67 Lotus Elan Drophead
67 Elan FHC
66 Cooper S
71 Escort Twin Cam
76 Escort RS2000
Years of Boring Company Cars
2000 Westfield Cosworth, still in the garage Smile
1999 Carrera 4
2007 997.1 GT3 Clubsport
_________________
2007 Speed Yellow 997 Carrera GT3 CS
2000 Westfield Cosworth
 
  
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Pedders
Trainee


Joined: 07 Aug 2016
Posts: 51



PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 10:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

01 VW Golf TDI 150
90 Toyota Celica GT4
98 Vauxhall Astra Diesel
95 Mazda RX7 Type-RM tuned by FEED
92 Peugeot 106 Diesel
86 Toyota AE86 Trueno (panda)
98 Nissan Skyline R34 GTT Abflug
00 Nissan Stagea Masa Motorsport
01 Renault Clio 182
13 Hyundai Genesis Coupe
06 Porsche C4S
18 Porsche GT3 Clubsport
 
  
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FredGT3
Silverstone


Joined: 06 Sep 2011
Posts: 141



PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2017 1:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

79 Ford Capri 1.6S
86 MG Metro
88 XR2 Mk2
89 RS Trubo
83 XR2 Mk1
93 Sierra Cosworth
94 Escort Cosworth
97 Esprit GT3
96 Esprit V8
00 Evo VI (still owned)
91 Excel SE
02 Esprit V8
03 Boxster
04 996.2 GT3
12 997.2 GTS
14 991.1 GT3

The first 911 I drove was a 964 RS, hated it on our local roads and it put me off 911's as I though if this is the best they do! I also wasn't experienced enough to know how to drive it back then.
_________________
Current 14 991 GT3

Previous 997 GTS, 996 GT3
 
  
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tonymac3
Newbie


Joined: 18 Jun 2016
Posts: 2
Location: London


PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2017 10:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alfa Sud 1.5Ti
Alfa Gulietta 2.0
Alfa GTV6
Clio Williams 3
Escort Cosworth T25
Audi S3 (LHD)
VW R32 MkIV DSG (LHD "one of 600 built)
Clio 182 Sport Cup
BMW X5
Audi Allroad
Mercedes ML350
Mistubishi Evo IX FQ-360
997 GT3 (current)
Mercedes ML350 (current)
Mercedes SL55 AMG (current)

plus a few company car hacks Sleepy Happy
 
  
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Slippydiff
Silverstone


Joined: 22 Nov 2007
Posts: 142



PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2017 9:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mk1 Escort Mexico (1st car)
Chevette HS
Opel Ascona 400
E30 M3 Evo 2
Sapphire Cosworth 2WD
VR6 Golf Highline (a massive brain fart)
E36 M3 Saloon
Impreza 22B One of 16 UK cars
964 RS Midnight Blue
964 RS Guards Red
993 RS Guards Red
Impreza P1
Mk1 996 GT3 Zanzibar
964 RS Rubystone
996 GT2 Midnight Blue
Gen 1997 GT3 Meteor Grey
Subaru Impreza WRC car (the 2nd WRC car Prodrive built)
Mk1 996 GT3 Zanzibar (I bought it back ! !)
M3 CSL
996 GT2 Basalt Black (Ohlins, remap, Ruf exhaust)
996 GT3 RS White with Red
Gen 1 997 GT3 Slate Grey
1M Coupe Orange
1M Coupe White AP's, Sparco race seats install, decat, custom geo set up.
M6 V10
964 RS Ferrari Yellow
Mk1 996 GT3 Black with Ohlins, Clubsport cage, Manthey K400 etc (still owned)
Mk1 996 GT3 Clubsport Guards Red
Cayman R Guards Red

To save you recounting, that’s four 964 RS’s four Mk1 996 GT3’s, two 996 GT2's and two 997 GT3's. Very Happy
There's a shed load of other daily drivers, but most were very mundane
Sleepy Happy
 
  
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MJA911
Indianapolis


Joined: 10 Dec 2013
Posts: 2428
Location: Berkshire

2006 Porsche 997 GT3

PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2017 10:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, that's amazing, are these sequential ownerships or sometimes parrallel?

Slightly off topic, but how did your 997 GT3's stack up in this company?
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Past: 997.2 C4S, 993 C2, 997.1 C2S, 996.1 C4
 
  
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Slippydiff
Silverstone


Joined: 22 Nov 2007
Posts: 142



PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2017 11:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fantastic cars, but a bit too accomplished as a road car.
My favorites out of the Porsche stable would be my Manthey K400 black car, the Basalt black GT2 with Ruf exhaust, map & Ohlins etc, and my first Midnight blue 964 RS. Non of them were garage queens, all were nicely fettled drivers cars.

I owned the Zanzibar Mk1 GT3 and the M3 CSL together. I then owned the Meteor 997 GT3, the Midnight blue GT2 and the Impreza WRC car at the same time. And I subsequently owned the Basalt 996 GT2 and Zanzibar GT3 (second time round) at the same time. Porsche
 
  
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jotaking
Spa-Francorchamps


Joined: 01 Jun 2012
Posts: 285



PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2017 7:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Slippydiff wrote:
Mk1 Escort Mexico (1st car)
Chevette HS
Opel Ascona 400
E30 M3 Evo 2
Sapphire Cosworth 2WD
VR6 Golf Highline (a massive brain fart)
E36 M3 Saloon
Impreza 22B One of 16 UK cars
964 RS Midnight Blue
964 RS Guards Red
993 RS Guards Red
Impreza P1
Mk1 996 GT3 Zanzibar
964 RS Rubystone
996 GT2 Midnight Blue
Gen 1997 GT3 Meteor Grey
Subaru Impreza WRC car (the 2nd WRC car Prodrive built)
Mk1 996 GT3 Zanzibar (I bought it back ! !)
M3 CSL
996 GT2 Basalt Black (Ohlins, remap, Ruf exhaust)
996 GT3 RS White with Red
Gen 1 997 GT3 Slate Grey
1M Coupe Orange
1M Coupe White AP's, Sparco race seats install, decat, custom geo set up.
M6 V10
964 RS Ferrari Yellow
Mk1 996 GT3 Black with Ohlins, Clubsport cage, Manthey K400 etc (still owned)
Mk1 996 GT3 Clubsport Guards Red
Cayman R Guards Red

To save you recounting, that’s four 964 RS’s four Mk1 996 GT3’s, two 996 GT2's and two 997 GT3's. Very Happy
There's a shed load of other daily drivers, but most were very mundane
Sleepy Happy


Think we have the winner!

What a list of Motors, it reads like a Sheik's garage!

You are one lucky boy!
 
  
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HSC911
Sepang


Joined: 23 Jul 2014
Posts: 2862
Location: Bedford


PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2017 9:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jotaking wrote:
Think we have the winner!




Agree
 
  
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LaSource
Nürburgring


Joined: 08 Feb 2009
Posts: 403



PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2017 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Was going to post here but slippy is just taking the biscuit now Smile

..but yeah it was like some standard sporty cars and hatchbacks, then a 996 GT3, and then the rest is history Smile
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997 GT3 RS 3.8
996 GT3 RS
KTM XBOW RR Superlight Spec
BMW E39 M5, BMW E46 M3
Land Rover Discovery 4 HSE

Previous:
981 GT4 3.8 Clubsport
997 GT3 RS 4.0, 997 GT3 RS 4.0, 997 GT3 RS 3.8
996 GT3 RS, 996 GT3 Mk2 Clubsport
996 GT3 Mk2 Comfort
 
  
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Slippydiff
Silverstone


Joined: 22 Nov 2007
Posts: 142



PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2017 4:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

FredGT3 wrote:
79 Ford Capri 1.6S
86 MG Metro
88 XR2 Mk2
89 RS Trubo
83 XR2 Mk1
93 Sierra Cosworth
94 Escort Cosworth
97 Esprit GT3
96 Esprit V8
00 Evo VI (still owned)
91 Excel SE
02 Esprit V8
03 Boxster
04 996.2 GT3
12 997.2 GTS
14 991.1 GT3

The first 911 I drove was a 964 RS, hated it on our local roads and it put me off 911's as I though if this is the best they do! I also wasn't experienced enough to know how to drive it back then.


Totally understandable. I went from a Type UK Impreza 22B (stolen within a month of purchase) to a 964 RS (my first Porsche) and bought 'cause I wanted something hardcore that would fly under the radar (and only those in the know knew what a 964 RS was).

The road test was horrendous, squeaky brakes (Pagid blues) knackered clutch, frequent stalling (my own ineptitude along with the usual 964 RS lightweight flywheel stalling issues) poor steering lock and heavy unassisted steering (the vendor took me through a busy village with several mini-roundabouts on a Saturday morning) boneshaking ride, and a gearbox I struggled with (as a result of it being a left hand drive car).
In all it was an unpleasant and somewhat testing experience, but .....
despite all the above, I could see what a fantastic concept it was, and the ethos behind the car.
I bought the car and the vendor took it to JZM to sort the numerous issues on my behalf.
What appeared from JZM a couple of weeks later was a complete transformation. New brakes, new clutch, de-cat/remap, Cup steeering wheel etc etc.
That was the start of 15 years of 964 RS ownership (on and off) and four different cars.
My passion for them remains undimmed to to this day. Whether I'll be able justify (or indeed afford) to get back into one, time will tell. But as anyone who has driven one on a fast, smooth twisting A or B road will tell you, they are truly wonderful cars.
Here's my "eulogy" to them. Enjoy. :

55 times better than a Boxster ? That depends on the criteria you're judging them by. They're 55 times more rare, of that I'm certain. And that, I suspect, counts for a lot.

I'd say they're 55 times more engaging, tactile and "special" to drive than any Boxster too.

0-60 ? Quite frankly if that's your benchmark for what makes a car great (or not great) you most likely won't get the RS.

Overly stiff ride ? Grow a f*ckin pair (it's an urban myth, so get one with decent, modern tyres (ie not ten year old Michelin MXX's) fresh dampers, sensible geo settings and ride heights, and you'll find them an absolute blast for A & B road hooning.

Build a rep on the cheap ? yep, course it can be done, but it's the little things that make them. Take the ali bonnet for example, lift it up ('cause there's no gas struts to help you) prop it up using the ali strut (who's end goes into a specially formed nut that doubles up as the securing nut for the strut top mount).

Pull on the inner door latch release pulls (formed from doubled up loops of seat belt material) feel the way they release the door latches so mechanically (then try the pastiche of the same idea on the Cayman R and feel how, as a sop to the RS, they've tried to incorporate the same idea into a door trim that wasn't designed for it (neither was the release mechanism) and feel how utterly sh*te it feels in it's action when compared to the original. It's what happens when the marketing men decree what goes into a car, rather than letting an engineer decide.

Put the dainty key into the ignition switch and turn it against the perfectly weighted spring loading of the switch. Just as your wrist starts to run out of articulation, the starter kicks in and the flat six bursts into life. If your foot isn't on the clutch, you'll hear the sound of the gears in the transmission rattling away as the lack of a dual mass flywheel (and the harmonic damping it usually provides) allows the gears to chatter excitedly within their casing.

Sit there and wait for some heat to percolate through the flat six, and soon after you'll be able to hear the thick, glutinous oil coursing through the pipes running the length of the car as the precious life blood is pumped towards the thermostat, only to be sent back to be warmed further without troubling the car's oil cooler.

Press down the floor hinged clutch pedal with it's initially awkward over-centre action, then gently palm the slightly baulky gearlever into first. Press the accelerator expecting the tardy, nee lazy, damped response most modern cars provide, and find this car's powerplant reacts instantaneously and you've just encouraged the rev counter around to 3000rpm, and not the 1200rpm you'd intended.

Try again, but being too timid, you stall it .......

Another attempt, this time you succeed as the car's low down torque aids your franky pathetic attempts to master the over-centre clutch, the hair trigger throttle response and the recalcitrant gearbox.

Out on the open road, the oil temperature gauge shows signs of life, the gearbox becomes less baulky and the steering starts to lighten with speed.

Twenty minutes in and the engine is now nicely warmed through. Let the fun commence ......

From your gentle fifth gear cruise, change down into third and slowly depress the long travel, floor hinged throttle pedal all the way to it's stop. The induction noise hardens and increases in volume, the drivetrain grumbles as you accelerate through the rev range and the lack of dual mass flywheel creates harsh resonances that sound more akin to a coffee grinder. But keep accelerating and they'll disappear to leave just the mechanical sound of the flat six along with it's induction noise and the cooling fan shifting vast quantities of soothing, cool air over the barrels and cylinder heads buried within the bowels of that nondescript looking engine compartment.

At 6,800 rpm in third the gamee's all over and its time to start the process all over again in fourth.
A quick, gentle lift of the throttle, along with a short, quick prod of the clutch, allows you to thread the perfectly weighted, short(ish) throw, gear lever through the gate.

A corner approaches, so you lift off the throttle and change down, you get back on the throttle and turn the steering wheel, initially the helm feels stodgy, heavy and unresponsive, you curse the lack of power steering as the nose seems unwilling to cooperate with your request for a change in direction.
But wait, the wheel in front of you isn't the sole method of altering the car's trajectory, next time try using the brakes to keep the weight over the front wheels whilst you turn them, then carefully chose the moment to get back on the throttle (hard) to utilise both the grunt of that flat six AND the traction afforded as a result of its position over the rear wheels.

Suddenly 260hp seems more than enough to make indecently rapid progress, but more than that, you're a simply massive part of the process of going fast, you have to be, because without your guiding hand, your perfect timing, your ability to deftly come off the brakes and seamlessly reapply the throttle, this car doesn't steer, it needs, no relies, on you to manage it's imperfect weight distribution.

It's hot sweaty work in the summer, no aircon along with no insulation means that a large part of the heat generated by that 3.6 litre engine finds it's way into the cabin. Soon your back will be wringing wet and that "moist" feeling is only exacerbated by the leather facings on some of the most perfectly formed bucket seats ever to grace a car. Supportive enough to enable you to retain control without having to hang onto the steering wheel, but not so all enveloping as modern race seats.

On the right roads, driving experiences don't come much better, or indeed more intense.

And when you've had your "hit", you won't feel need to race home, instead you'll be happy to potter at 6/10's, watching as other far more powerful cars overtake you, safe in the knowledge that despite what the manufacturers of their cars may tell them, their owners will have little or no idea what tactility, engagement and fun behind the wheel really are.

Finally you'll arrive home, hot, sweaty and possibly slightly deaf..... You'll undo your seatbelt, remove the keys from the ignition, wind your window up and step out.When you slam the door shut, two things will stand out :

Firstly the delightful noise the door makes when it closes. Partly a function of it's bank vault build quality, and partly the fact that it's unencumbered by door pockets, airbags, central locking motors, electric windows or their switchgear.

And the second thing that will stand out when you slam the door shut ? A light, gentle, barely discernible tinkling noise...... wink

Those that have owned and driven these wonderful cars will most likely know what this "tinkling" noise is, whilst those that think they're an overpriced, underperforming, anachronism, probably won't. But neither will they care........

Last edited by Slippydiff on Thu Jun 29, 2017 4:47 pm; edited 1 time in total
 
  
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ras62
Montreal


Joined: 20 Jan 2012
Posts: 575
Location: Cheshire


PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2017 4:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

H you have mail Thumb
 
  
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jotaking
Spa-Francorchamps


Joined: 01 Jun 2012
Posts: 285



PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2017 4:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great write up on the 964RS Experience....

I almost feel like I've owned one after that!!

Ownership sounds like the holy grail to me.

It's a shame that these are now out of the stratosphere on price!

Just out of curiosity....Does anyone know what the 964RS bottomed out at and when??

IIRC 175K+ will get you LHD glory, 200K+ for the proper side??
 
  
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Slippydiff
Silverstone


Joined: 22 Nov 2007
Posts: 142



PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2017 4:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jotaking wrote:
Great write up on the 964RS Experience....

I almost feel like I've owned one after that!!

Ownership sounds like the holy grail to me.

It's a shame that these are now out of the stratosphere on price!

Just out of curiosity....Does anyone know what the 964RS bottomed out at and when??

IIRC 175K+ will get you LHD glory, 200K+ for the proper side??


The Midnight blue car cost me £23,500 in 2001/2, but I was "late to the party". Cars were selling at £17-18K in '99/2000.
My 993 RS cost me £34,500 .....
 
  
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Slippydiff
Silverstone


Joined: 22 Nov 2007
Posts: 142



PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2017 5:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ras62 wrote:
H you have mail Thumb


Hi Rob, have responded Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin

The multiple Grin will make sense once you've read my response Very Happy
 
  
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ELA
Suzuka


Joined: 30 Aug 2011
Posts: 1122
Location: Nurburgring Doorstep


PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2017 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As ever, great to hear of your prolonged foray into Porsches top shelf H. Really knocks you back a bit when you see it typed out like that;)

What really must be taken away from it all though, is that in the darkest corners out there somewhere lie creatures of your ilk, willing to do what is right in the world and take these wonderful cars and use them; not just use them but play with and hone them till they are just right for you, and sod what anyone else thinks. Hats off to you Henry Thumb and thanks for taking the time to pass on your considered and well written thoughts on the 964RS.
_________________
1275kg 997GT3RS with:
Kessels 458bhp 3.8l & vgs-MS ECU
Akrapovic titanium exhaust
Cup 9:35 diff, Airbox, PAS, front lip
BBS 19's
H&R Suspension
Carbon wings/doors/bonnet/door cards
 
  
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markvorny
Monza


Joined: 06 Feb 2011
Posts: 162
Location: Appleby Magna


PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2017 7:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

After wrestling with company cars, then opting out and running a BMW 335i, I entered the world of 911's.

Firstly a 2009 997.2 C2S. This created a lust which I still have to this day. Thoroughly enjoyed and it proved to be far cheaper to run than the BMW.

After 2 years, I upgraded to a 12 month old 991 C4S which I have just sold to fund a 2014 991.1 GT3.

This won't be so much of a daily as the previous models. I run an Abarth 595 daily now......
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2014 GT3 Clubsport
Carrara White,
 
  
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Disco
Estoril


Joined: 13 May 2008
Posts: 3578
Location: Hertfordshire

2010 Porsche 997 GT3

PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2017 8:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jotaking wrote:
Just out of curiosity....Does anyone know what the 964RS bottomed out at and when??


I used to know a guy that sold one for £16k (which was at a significant profit, despite having bent it and had it repaired), but I am not sure of the year.

[He subsequently made strong returns on an early delivery 458 and a used 4 litre 997 RS, so you are not allowed to express sympathy... Wink ]
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Black 997 GT3 3.8 CS - Acquired for the 2012 season and beyond
Black 996 GT3 Mk2 - Gone, but will never be forgotten
 
  
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FredGT3
Silverstone


Joined: 06 Sep 2011
Posts: 141



PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2017 8:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Slippydiff wrote:

Totally understandable. I went from a Type UK Impreza 22B (stolen within a month of purchase) to a 964 RS (my first Porsche) and bought 'cause I wanted something hardcore that would fly under the radar (and only those in the know knew what a 964 RS was).


Thanks for posting Henry. The car I drove was the Rubystone press car, it was owned by a neighbour. Living in the fens our roads were too bumpy for it and as I said as a younger man I didn't get the whole 911 driving experience.

I did take some notice of one on a private track day at Anglesey where my V8 Esprit was more than a match for a well known GTR owner and his 355, I couldn't touch the 964 RS though and was marvelling at its ability under braking and through the corners.

It was my wife wanting a Boxster and finding that I enjoyed it that persuaded me to try a 911. Jamie at Paragon let me try out the 996 GT3 and I bought it immediately. I don't think I will be without a a 911 for some time now, I appreciate them now.

I do remember seeing 964 RS adverts at the low point and deeply regret not buying one!

Regards
Fred
_________________
Current 14 991 GT3

Previous 997 GTS, 996 GT3
 
  
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