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Sean Massie
Newbie


Joined: 23 Apr 2005
Posts: 6



PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 9:04 am    Post subject: Another Battery Related Question Reply with quote

I don't drive my car enough - I know. So the battery going flat is a fairly regular occurrence. And I know that when I go to it later it will probably be flat and I'll have to jump it.

Anyway what I actually want to know is there anyway of stopping the alarm going off when the battery has gone flat? Having the key in the ignition doesn't stop it. Is there another way? - it hurts my ears!!

Thanks
 
  
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pietrzj
Monza


Joined: 19 Mar 2014
Posts: 211



PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 4:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

when the battery is flat the alarm siren is run off the siren's internal battery. If the siren is old it could be its battery is knackered and draining your main battery.

If its a H&P siren system it may be positioned in your engine bay. There may be a connector close by or within it that you can disconnect. There is one inside for just the battery if you are happy to not have the siren at all when the battery is flat or its been disconnected by a thief you can leave that one disconnected. Cop
 
  
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Demort
Estoril


Joined: 21 Mar 2015
Posts: 3502
Location: Sussex


PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 7:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ear protectors or have the siren removed and coded OFF as it can trigger the alarm if not coded off on a standard Porsche system.

Oh and yes 30 seconds of it going off isnt pleasent as theres no way to stop it untill its run its cycle .

Batterys going dead flat is not good for them , they tend to die much quicker.

No chance of a battery trickle charger i take it , or a solar one .
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Sean Massie
Newbie


Joined: 23 Apr 2005
Posts: 6



PostPosted: Sat Apr 22, 2017 3:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for replies.

Can't use a trickle charger unfortunately - street parking. I am using one of the solar ones which seems to improve the length of time I can leave it to about a week, sometimes longer.

The battery is only about a year old and I seem to have to change them every 18 months or so. It's been checked for extra current draw and dodgy alternator but all OK it seems.

Next time the car is in for something I think I will see if the chap can remove the siren and re-code. I think this is going to be an ongoing problem which I can't get around!
 
  
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thecarfixer
Trainee


Joined: 03 Nov 2016
Posts: 99



PostPosted: Sat Apr 22, 2017 7:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If your car only lasts a week (if that) before flattening the battery, you have a parasitic drain problem, or a faulty battery.
 
  
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Sean Massie
Newbie


Joined: 23 Apr 2005
Posts: 6



PostPosted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 8:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm sure there is a battery drain too but it can't be found.

Also I know it's got a tracker because I've got the paperwork so it could be that but God knows where it's hidden.
 
  
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thecarfixer
Trainee


Joined: 03 Nov 2016
Posts: 99



PostPosted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 8:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Best way to isolate it in the absence of any equipment like an ammeter is to start pulling fuses for permanent live circuits, do one at a time and leave the car - that'll then isolate where you need to look.

I wouldn't want to leave the car with a battery drain issue like that, over a longer term..
 
  
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pietrzj
Monza


Joined: 19 Mar 2014
Posts: 211



PostPosted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 1:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ammeter and pulling fuses is the best way, but remember different circuits are powered when the car is locked and alarmed. I fed the ammeter leads through the hood seal so I could lock the car for the test.

The quiickest way is to remove half of all the fuses and take a reading. if it is higher than expected take half of the remaining fuses out and so on.

If the reading is normal after removing the first half of the fuses, replace half of them and repeat test. I am sure you get teh idea here.

The mA value you should be in the regoin of must be on a thread somewhere. I can't remember what mine was.
 
  
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Demort
Estoril


Joined: 21 Mar 2015
Posts: 3502
Location: Sussex


PostPosted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 3:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sean Massie wrote:
I'm sure there is a battery drain too but it can't be found.

Also I know it's got a tracker because I've got the paperwork so it could be that but God knows where it's hidden.


Tracker batterys when they fail give a pulsed discharge every 30 - 40 seconds or so ..

PM me if its a standard tracker fitted by Porsche ( cobra ) and ill let you know a location to check for it .
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