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Leon1davies
Montreal


Joined: 04 Oct 2015
Posts: 595
Location: Bournemouth


PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 8:00 pm    Post subject: Interesting IMS video Reply with quote

Whilst doing some youtube browsing one evening I came across this video series of a chap showing the complete process of removing the transmission to replace his IMS and clutch in his boxster and how it can be done at home.

He finishes the series with a couple of videos talking about the IMS bearing and why it was designed in the way it was. He also has a theory about why cars that are driven regularly and have regular oil changes are much less likely to fail.

It made quite a lot of sense and I found it really interesting so thought i'd share it here


Open Youtube Page


its also a really interesting series for anyone who would consider doing the work themselves so I've linked episode 1 as well


Open Youtube Page
 
  
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Robertb
Long Beach


Joined: 01 Sep 2003
Posts: 6001
Location: South Oxfordshire

2002 Porsche 996 Carrera 4S

PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 2:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fascinating, makes a lot of sense. Worth following the first link in his video to the Pedro one, which is a great '101' guide to the bearings and shafts. Second one is interesting too, obvs Pedro has his angle on his DOF.

Rather cuts across the idea of opening the bearing seals.

Certainly my own limited experience of sealed bearings on roadbikes is that oil will happily pass through a seal.
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"911- the guilt-free supercar"

Current: 2003 C4S Coupe, seal/black

Ex: '02 C4S Coupe, '96 993 Targa, '88 Carrera Sport Coupe
 
  
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Robertb
Long Beach


Joined: 01 Sep 2003
Posts: 6001
Location: South Oxfordshire

2002 Porsche 996 Carrera 4S

PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 3:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can someone with better engineering nouse than me explain why a direct oil feed to the IMS is not a good idea, or is snake oil? Seems like a good idea to me, and relatively inexpensive.
Question
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Current: 2003 C4S Coupe, seal/black

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GT4
Nordschleife
Nordschleife


Joined: 08 Nov 2008
Posts: 30143
Location: Hertfordshire and Hampshire


PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Because pulling the seals is as effective, and is free*













*OK, so you have to get in there first, but that's true of the DOF too
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GARY S
Trainee


Joined: 06 Aug 2016
Posts: 75



PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 5:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yet another person with their own "take" on the IMS. If Porsche wanted the bearing to be lubricated by engine oil:
1. Why initially fit grease. Why not fit a direct oil feed right from the start as part of the engine manufacturing process.
2. Why direct that oil change are only required every 2 yrs of 20K miles whichever comes first. Surely they would want "fresh" oil to lubricate at all times. More frequent oil changes would also make OPC's more service revenues.
3. Why not make the IMS bearing a part to be "inspected" or replaced item say after 50K or 10 yrs.
The accepted "wisdom" is that Porsche got it wrong when designing the M96/97 by having an IMS in the first place. Having "fudges" the issue by trying to "fix" it over several years they scrapped the engine in 2009/10.
 
  
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alex yates
Shanghai
Shanghai


Joined: 06 Mar 2014
Posts: 10406
Location: Lancashire

2000 Porsche 996 Carrera 4

PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 5:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

GARY S wrote:
Yet another person with their own "take" on the IMS. If Porsche wanted the bearing to be lubricated by engine oil:
1. Why initially fit grease. Why not fit a direct oil feed right from the start as part of the engine manufacturing process.
2. Why direct that oil change are only required every 2 yrs of 20K miles whichever comes first. Surely they would want "fresh" oil to lubricate at all times. More frequent oil changes would also make OPC's more service revenues.
3. Why not make the IMS bearing a part to be "inspected" or replaced item say after 50K or 10 yrs.
The accepted "wisdom" is that Porsche got it wrong when designing the M96/97 by having an IMS in the first place. Having "fudges" the issue by trying to "fix" it over several years they scrapped the engine in 2009/10.



I can answer all that with one line - because they didn't think the grease filled ball bearing would go pop.

As I've said many 'o times to the officers of the law - "seemed like a good idea at the time" Embarassed
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GARY S
Trainee


Joined: 06 Aug 2016
Posts: 75



PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 8:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You are right Alex. Porsche, the "pinnacle of automotive engineering" screwed up and left their customers high & dry. Who knows what lurks in the future with the new turbo engines?
 
  
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alex yates
Shanghai
Shanghai


Joined: 06 Mar 2014
Posts: 10406
Location: Lancashire

2000 Porsche 996 Carrera 4

PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 8:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wouldn't say that. They gave all new owners a brand new engine if it went pop. Doubt the organisation who sold me mine would do that if it blew up.
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GARY S
Trainee


Joined: 06 Aug 2016
Posts: 75



PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 8:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you remember the black & white public information film of the family who fused their home electrics when they had a burst pipe? The comment by the narrator at the end of the clip was "pity you let it happen in the first place". Same applies to Porsche.
 
  
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alex yates
Shanghai
Shanghai


Joined: 06 Mar 2014
Posts: 10406
Location: Lancashire

2000 Porsche 996 Carrera 4

PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

They are by far the pinicle of automotive Engineering. Want a good engine, buy a BMW. Want fun - buy a Porsche.
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GARY S
Trainee


Joined: 06 Aug 2016
Posts: 75



PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree about the fun bit having had a Boxster & 997 Gen 1 from new. Just a shame that I always had a nagging doubt that the fragility of the build & that ultimately spoilt the full enjoyment.
 
  
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alex yates
Shanghai
Shanghai


Joined: 06 Mar 2014
Posts: 10406
Location: Lancashire

2000 Porsche 996 Carrera 4

PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 8:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And did anything bad happen?
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GARY S
Trainee


Joined: 06 Aug 2016
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 8:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Traded up from Boxster to 997 after 3 yrs & 8k miles so no time for issues. Had 997 from 2004-16. In 43K miles I had coil packs replaces twice, tandem pump once, air con condensers replaces once, replaces corroded front brake pipes once, exhaust triangle joints & bolds once. Car was always dealer services. The "usual" issues but not what I expected from Porsche.
 
  
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