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vlad
Österreich


Joined: 16 Aug 2006
Posts: 877
Location: Berkshire


PostPosted: Fri Jul 20, 2012 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

guess I have been fortunate in 8 years of ownership - until today that is.

In for routine service and had an advisory that one of the power steering pipes end clamps is splitting and its the best part of £1K to remedy!

Seems from this thread its quite a common failure.

Seems a bit of a design flaw - to have a part that seems to frequently perish like this to be so expensive to fix.

Have others had the same happen and other than buying time with the Jubilee clip fix is there another solution.

Using a section of pipe and adding a new union at a more accessible place?
Any idea why its such a time consuming fix whats invloved? Not that I'd try and undertake it as a DIY job but just to understand where my reddies are going to go !
 
  
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leacarrera4
Montreal


Joined: 28 Dec 2010
Posts: 526
Location: essex


PostPosted: Mon Jan 20, 2014 10:02 pm    Post subject: power steering pipe Reply with quote

Whilst attending the free inspection day at byfleet opc, the technician
pointed out some small corrosion on the crimped metal to rubber to section
on the power steering pipe that is located under the o/s/f wheel arch.

He was saying its quite a labour intensive job to change because of access
while feeding the pipe around all the the other parts.

Has anyone on here changed this pipe themselves, I have the pipe and
access to a ramp and wondered what sort of job it is to do.

cheers....Lea bye
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vlad
Österreich


Joined: 16 Aug 2006
Posts: 877
Location: Berkshire


PostPosted: Mon Jan 20, 2014 10:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, I haven't changed it, but having exactly the same reported by the same OPC I did some investigation and had a jubilee clip placed around the offending connector. It seems like a weakspot with the model.

I wonder whether a specialist power steering repair company could at cheaper cost cut and reconnect the pipe ? It does look a major job especially if you have a 4WD variant.
 
  
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leacarrera4
Montreal


Joined: 28 Dec 2010
Posts: 526
Location: essex


PostPosted: Mon Jan 20, 2014 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the reply vlad
he said the same thing regarding the jubilee clip
its quick and easy to do and my corrosion is very small
but I like to do the job properly but it looks a pig Mad

jubilee clip bit of a bodge but opc said that's what they
fit because of the work involved Surprised
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911UK
Porsche Community
Porsche Community


Joined: 15 May 2002
Posts: 10335
Location: 911UK

1997 Porsche 993 Carrera 2

PostPosted: Mon Jan 20, 2014 11:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

this was posted over in the US of A
http://forums.rennlist.com/rennforums/996-forum/715293-how-to-replace-leaking-rear-high-pressure-power-steering-hose-1999-996-a.html

Quote:
Replacing a Rear High Pressure Power Steering hose on a 1999 Porsche 996 Carrera 2...

Recently after a drive in my 1999 Porsche 996 I spotted some kind of fluid dripping from the engine on the passenger side. I couldn't immediately figure out if it was oil or water but since this car had never leaked anything since I'd bought it I was quite alarmed and frankly a bit scared. I've always said, almost anyone can buy a Porsche, but only the dedicated can maintain one.

The fluid that was dripping was kind of like oily water, and that just scared me even more as I immediately began thinking of the dreaded oil/water mixing syndrome. Well, after eliminating what things were definitely not in that area of the car I kind of figured that it was one of the power steering hoses since it seemed to be coming from above the variocam unit. Next I checked the power steering fluid level and lo and behold it was bone dry. At first I thought, that's not so bad, could certainly be worse. Well no, it is bad. The Pentosin power steering/clutch fluid used in this car is highly flammable and basically can set the car on fire should it land on the exhaust pipe.
With the airbox removed I could see my leak was coming from what I identified as the high pressure line. I immediately took to the internet to see if anyone had posted a tutorial on how to swap out the leaking hose, and sadly I basically found next to nothing. A week after emailing the service manager for an estimate at one of few Porsche dealers where I live, and still getting no response, I decided it was time to take matters into my own hands.

Disclaimer: I am not a mechanic, I am a musician. I have owned a 1973 914, a 1985.5 944, a 1987 944S, and now this 1999 996, and I've never let anyone work on my car If I didn't have to (and that's been never). I believe if you have the right tools, knowledge, and the right mindset anyone can do most of the basic work you'll probably ever need to do on any decent Porsche.

So here we go...

First of all I got the part from Porsche, I got the correct, genuine part, and it's basically no more money than anywhere else. I also got a container of Pentosin.

1) Disconnect your battery.
2) Disconnect the MAF sensor from the airbox.
3) Remove the airbox.
4) Slightly loosen the bolts on the power steering pully.
5) Remove the serpentine belt (24mm).
6) Remove the power steering pully.
7) Remove the throttle body unit. The throttle body is 4 bolts, two electrical connections, an air hose, and one line that'll stay connected. Put the throttle body off to the side and wrap it in a towel or something so it doesn't get damaged.
Cool Remove the plenum, which is a fancy word for the air tube behind the throttle body. It's got four hose clamps.
9) Drain (which in my case I didn't have to) the upper power steering fluid reservoir and remove it by turning the ring counter-clockwise. No tools necessary, use your hand, it comes off easily.

Easy enough so far, right? Well here comes the difficult parts of this job, the reason why Porsche gets the big bucks...

10) Remove the AC compressor. Three bolts must be removed. All three are 13mm.
Remove the two front bolts.
Now here comes just about this whole job...The world-renowned rear bolt on the AC compressor.
This is how I did it:
Tools:
A short, lean 13mm socket for a 1/4" drive, a 1/4" universal, an 8" extension for 1/4" drive, an adapter 1/4" to 3/8", and finally a 3/8" ratchet.
With your right hand feed the ratchet set-up through the space between the manifold at cylinder #4 and 5. Place the heat sensor (you'll easily see it) out of the way for more room to work.
With your left hand reach through where the throttle body/plenum was and feel for where the third bolt is on the rear of the AC compressor.
IMPORTANT: Get the socket set squarely onto the bolt before proceeding. Do not proceed until you have achieved this.
Remember, if you strip this bolt GAME OVER.
I actually put my left hand in to hold it square on the bolt while my friend spun the ratchet with two hands.
Slide the AC Compressor out, disconnect one measly wire and place the AC unit on the ledge of the engine bay.
REMEMBER: If you get discouraged or frustrated, walk away and come back, have a friend help, use the tools I said to use, get it to sit square on the bolt. Oh and I also used some liquid wrench ( don't know if it really helped or not). IT CAN BE DONE I PROMISE YOU.

11) Remove the leaking high pressure hose.
Use a 17mm open end wrench to remove the line where it attaches to the power steering pump. Collect any fluid that comes out. Even though it's called a high pressure line, it won't come out spraying all over the place. But it's nasty stuff so don't let it get on anything else.
Now for the other end...
*make sure for this next step that you are working with the same high pressure line or you'll have to replace the return line too.
Get a small hack saw (I used the finest blade from my Sawz-All) and by hand, cut the copper line closest to you and just before the connection. You're not keeping the leaky line anyway and this will allow you to use the closed end of a wrench (15mm) on the part of the connection closest to you.
With the closed end of the 15mm wrench on the part of the connector closest to you, hold it still while with another 15mm open end wrench turn the connection closest toward the front of the car clockwise. This part took a little while for me to do. Don't get frustrated, I did it and so can you. Make sure you're ready for a little fluid to spill.
When you've disconnected this you have basically finished the job (in a way).

12) Connect up the new line, I snaked it through to the rear connector, then attached it first at the pump (17mm) and then to the rear connector (again two 15mm's). *I removed the connector end (you'll see which I mean) from the new hose line and reused the old connector (already in place on the line), no leaks at all. You may want to remove this part on the new line before you get it into place.

Put everything back together in reverse. Sorry, it's just too much to write but I'll say this... I think you'll be suprised how fast everything goes back together.
Top off the Power steering fluid and go for a test drive.
Check for leaks.
None?
Now pat yourself on the back and think twice before emailing Porsche for a service quote.

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porscheski
Nürburgring


Joined: 13 Dec 2013
Posts: 445
Location: Leicester


PostPosted: Tue Jan 21, 2014 3:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

just had exactly this issue on my 996. fluid everywhere. took it to my local garage -as it had no fluid it was half a mile away-they are very good and they diagnosed the problem in two minutes. they have put the jubilee clip fix in place and i will try and find a mobile firm to recrimp a new end on it . if thats not possible i might just run it as is. if its sealed I'm good.
i used to drive atlas crane lorries and there were firms who came out and repaired hoses on site so I'm sure its not a big deal,so long as access is ok.
 
  
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cheshire911
Estoril


Joined: 10 Jun 2012
Posts: 3863



PostPosted: Tue Jan 21, 2014 5:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quite a common fault. This was picked up in the PPI on my car. I had the proper fix carried out by my local indy - thought about a jubilee job, but then decided to have the car right. Same issue, the steel bit at the end was splitting due to corrosion.

The new fitment was greased to prevent water corroding it.

All fine.
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quattrosteph
Barcelona


Joined: 14 Apr 2012
Posts: 1430
Location: Buckinghamshire


PostPosted: Wed Jan 22, 2014 5:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Same problem with mine.....common on all 996. Jubilee clip been fitted to stop the alu to crack further. Haven't move since , been well over a year.
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DeathStar
Barcelona


Joined: 19 Apr 2012
Posts: 1474
Location: Inside the event horizon

2006 Porsche 997 Turbo

PostPosted: Wed Jan 22, 2014 5:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

quattrosteph wrote:
Same problem with mine.....common on all 996. Jubilee clip been fitted to stop the alu to crack further. Haven't move since , been well over a year.


Same here Steph - the jubilee-clip fix is fine; been about a year and no leaks whatsoever ...
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wasz
Paul Ricard


Joined: 28 Dec 2012
Posts: 3051


1999 Porsche 996 Carrera 2

PostPosted: Wed Jan 22, 2014 11:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another with a jubilee clip on a split crimp here Smile

It's doing the same job as the crimp, so mechanically identical.
 
  
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ELA
Barcelona


Joined: 30 Aug 2011
Posts: 1346
Location: Nurburgring Doorstep


PostPosted: Fri Jan 24, 2014 1:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Does anyone have a picture of where this corrosion emanates from on the PAS hose. Would just like to do a precautionary check on mine
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cheshire911
Estoril


Joined: 10 Jun 2012
Posts: 3863



PostPosted: Fri Jan 24, 2014 3:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ignore the posting from rennlist - this is for a rear hose. The part I am referring to is a pre-formed metal pipe with flexible hose attached at the front of the car. I don't know if it can be seen in situ or if the front PU has to come off.

Personally I'd say this is not a DIY job - its very fiddly and messy and quite labour intensive. If you want yours checked maybe the best way is to take it to an indy and ask him to do an inspection on the front power steering hoses?
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perrin996
Monza


Joined: 09 Jul 2011
Posts: 206



PostPosted: Fri Jan 24, 2014 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ELA wrote:
Does anyone have a picture of where this corrosion emanates from on the PAS hose. Would just like to do a precautionary check on mine


I dont have a picture but if you turn the offside wheel fully round so you can see the front arms you will be able to see the hose and the clamp.

I had a jubile clip fitted 3 yrs ago and it is still OK.

steve
 
  
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colt
Spa-Francorchamps


Joined: 13 Apr 2008
Posts: 272
Location: wiltshire


PostPosted: Fri Jan 24, 2014 4:55 pm    Post subject: pas crimp splitting Reply with quote

The pas line at the power steering rack connection is as far as i know the low pressure return hose and therefore has no significant pressure in it.It seems fine to use a jubillee clip to secure the hose either after removing what is left of the alloy crimp or over the top of it to reinforce it. either way it should last for years not months. I have even seen two clips fitted side by side as an extra precaution. I have never seen a pipe blow off or even leak in over ten years of full time porsche repair and includes ones where the crimp is anytrhing from 10% to 70% split.
Christian.................
 
  
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infrasilver
Fast & Furious
Fast & Furious


Joined: 04 Oct 2010
Posts: 8545
Location: East Midlands

2001 Porsche 996 Targa

PostPosted: Fri Jan 24, 2014 11:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Two wide jubilee clips side by side on mine have done the trick for the last 3 years.
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Griffter
Nürburgring


Joined: 22 May 2016
Posts: 385



PostPosted: Sat Jun 04, 2016 7:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mine started to split. I put a jubilee clip on. Opc congratulated me and said its fine. Specialist said the same. Mot man didn't comment.
 
  
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infrasilver
Fast & Furious
Fast & Furious


Joined: 04 Oct 2010
Posts: 8545
Location: East Midlands

2001 Porsche 996 Targa

PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2016 10:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

infrasilver wrote:
Two wide jubilee clips side by side on mine have done the trick for the last 3 years.


I inspected mine today whilst doing suspension work, after remembering this thread I thought I take a picture for reference, 5 + years on and it's still fine.


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wasz
Paul Ricard


Joined: 28 Dec 2012
Posts: 3051


1999 Porsche 996 Carrera 2

PostPosted: Wed May 10, 2017 2:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Check the other end of this pipe - middle front above anti roll bar, you can just about see it. That end also had a split crimp on mine. Mine was making a bid for freedom, however the leak was from the crusty hard lines on the rack.

You need to drop the ARB which involves removing 10 bolts. The bolt holes you see here are for the front of the crossbraces.





I used a genuine Jubilee 22-38mm clip.

I'm replacing the crusty hard lines on the rack with copper.
 
  
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CraigM
Newbie


Joined: 12 Feb 2020
Posts: 1



PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2020 9:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bit of a thread resurrection here, but I have the same problem... I've jubileed the connection, but there is still a fine most of fluid sprayed, when I had a look it appeared to be coming from the metal pipe in th foreground of the attached photo, car is a C4S, anyone able to advise what this pipe is? Is it possibly the case I didn't tighten the jubilees enough, or could the fluid come out of the top of the hose if the crimp is loose? I kept the factory crimp on, should I try removing that?

Thanks,

Craig
 



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