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Mac996t
Montreal


Joined: 26 Mar 2011
Posts: 518


2004 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Mon Dec 09, 2019 6:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I’d make a decision based on a close inspection of the old bearing and having a look in the sump at the oil pickups. I’d remove the covers from the bearing and have a look at just how much wear there is ,and if there are any bits of metal in there wether they were big pieces or a fine paste. The bearing will have been grinding away for a while so you will already have had bits circulating in the oil and so far they haven’t caused a blow up

Big pieces can jam in an oil pump and break the drive, or get stuck in the solenoids etc, fine pieces just scrape the inside.

I’ve had lots of engines apart over the years and most have shown signs of small amounts of debris going through oil pumps and leaving scratches etc, a small amount won’t make an engine fail.

If the only evidence was for fine particles I’d fit a new bearing and chance it and do an oil change in 1k miles and see how much you’ve collected

Mac
 
  
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mar1b0ro
Newbie


Joined: 16 Oct 2017
Posts: 37



PostPosted: Tue Dec 10, 2019 12:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

EGTE wrote:
That is of course fraud, well done.


Err, not if there really was a cat...bloody bad luck I'd call it.
_________________
In the land of the blind, the one eyed man is king.
 
  
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DarthFaker
Trainee


Joined: 13 Jun 2019
Posts: 57



PostPosted: Tue Dec 10, 2019 2:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mar1b0ro wrote:
EGTE wrote:
That is of course fraud, well done.


Err, not if there really was a cat...bloody bad luck I'd call it.


I think avoiding a cat isn't a good enough reason, but I believe a dog is. If I remember correctly from when I worked in insurance.
 
  
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Martin996RSR
Nürburgring


Joined: 08 Dec 2016
Posts: 446



PostPosted: Tue Dec 10, 2019 3:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What about something cat-sized but quite rare, such as a Lemur?
 
  
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HSC911
Long Beach


Joined: 23 Jul 2014
Posts: 6873
Location: Bedford


PostPosted: Tue Dec 10, 2019 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mar1b0ro wrote:
Option 6 - put car back together, drive into nearest tree at 30mph avoiding cat that came out of nowhere, claim for total loss on insurance.


Floor

Option 7 - Electrical fault in frunk which had spare can of fuel in

 
  
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UncleP
Silverstone


Joined: 27 Feb 2019
Posts: 140



PostPosted: Thu Dec 12, 2019 1:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Recent post on Pistonheads revealed that its in the small print on many policies that they won't pay out for a fire caused by an electrical fault. It's viewed similar to a mechanical failure and not the insurance companies concern.
 
  
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Robertb
Dijon


Joined: 01 Sep 2003
Posts: 7456
Location: South Oxfordshire

2002 Porsche 996 Carrera 4S

PostPosted: Thu Dec 12, 2019 1:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DarthFaker wrote:
mar1b0ro wrote:
EGTE wrote:
That is of course fraud, well done.


Err, not if there really was a cat...bloody bad luck I'd call it.


I think avoiding a cat isn't a good enough reason, but I believe a dog is. If I remember correctly from when I worked in insurance.


Not pelicans either...

https://jalopnik.com/the-guy-who-crashed-a-bugatti-into-a-lake-has-been-sent-1748158995
_________________
"911- the guilt-free supercar"

Current: 2003 C4S Coupe, seal/black

Ex: '02 C4S Coupe, '96 993 Targa, '88 Carrera Sport Coupe
 
  
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GMG
Nürburgring


Joined: 07 Jan 2018
Posts: 476
Location: Devon


PostPosted: Thu Dec 12, 2019 5:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

...he's an American what do you expect?
 
  
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Alex
Le Mans
Le Mans


Joined: 06 Mar 2014
Posts: 17203
Location: The Ribble Valley, Lancashire

2000 Porsche 996 Carrera 4

PostPosted: Thu Dec 12, 2019 9:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

UncleP wrote:
Recent post on Pistonheads revealed that its in the small print on many policies that they won't pay out for a fire caused by an electrical fault. It's viewed similar to a mechanical failure and not the insurance companies concern.


I just set the fuel line on fire with a lighter on my sister's Astra and they paid out straight away.
_________________
2000 Manual 996 C4 Arctic Silver Convertible


 
  
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DarthFaker
Trainee


Joined: 13 Jun 2019
Posts: 57



PostPosted: Mon Dec 16, 2019 6:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So I made a little video with my thoughts on IMS bearings, it covers more than I can be bothered typing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5MOvFby-NCo

If you can bear watching a northerner rant for 8 minutes, and let me know what you think.

James.
 
  
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Robertb
Dijon


Joined: 01 Sep 2003
Posts: 7456
Location: South Oxfordshire

2002 Porsche 996 Carrera 4S

PostPosted: Mon Dec 16, 2019 7:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DarthFaker wrote:
So I made a little video with my thoughts on IMS bearings, it covers more than I can be bothered typing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5MOvFby-NCo

If you can bear watching a northerner rant for 8 minutes, and let me know what you think.

James.


Some interesting thoughts there James, but please don’t keep clicking your biro in the next video! what

Are you going for an EPS cylindrical bearing?

Your comments on more bearings failing as the cars get older is contrary to everything I’ve heard... what changed your mind on that one? Looks like you were lucky that your intermediate shaft didn’t let go and do loads of damage...
_________________
"911- the guilt-free supercar"

Current: 2003 C4S Coupe, seal/black

Ex: '02 C4S Coupe, '96 993 Targa, '88 Carrera Sport Coupe
 
  
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GMG
Nürburgring


Joined: 07 Jan 2018
Posts: 476
Location: Devon


PostPosted: Mon Dec 16, 2019 8:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

...a similar story to mine...immaculate FOPC history car at 69k miles...ims failed resulting in £14k rebuild...

Prior to the failure I spoke with Hartech whom said ignore the hype and drive the car!

My advice to anyone thinking of buying one is buy one with a rebuilt motor unless you can afford a £10k plus bill...because failure can't be predicted !

Equally I wouldn't touch one with more than about 80 ish k that hadn't been rebuilt because of the main bearing wear issues.

I won't mention borescore because you can at least detect this...

My prediction is that as the years pass anything that hasn't had a rebuilt motor will be worth peanuts ... why would one take the risk?
 
  
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DarthFaker
Trainee


Joined: 13 Jun 2019
Posts: 57



PostPosted: Mon Dec 16, 2019 9:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Robertb wrote:
DarthFaker wrote:
So I made a little video with my thoughts on IMS bearings, it covers more than I can be bothered typing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5MOvFby-NCo

If you can bear watching a northerner rant for 8 minutes, and let me know what you think.

James.


Some interesting thoughts there James, but please don’t keep clicking your biro in the next video! what

Are you going for an EPS cylindrical bearing?

Your comments on more bearings failing as the cars get older is contrary to everything I’ve heard... what changed your mind on that one? Looks like you were lucky that your intermediate shaft didn’t let go and do loads of damage...


Because all things mechanical fail eventually and nothing gets better in a mechanical system without intervention.

There's a statistic for bearings called an L10 life which is a 10% failure rate at any given number of rotations at a given load and speed.

All bearings fail eventually, but as external influences, heat, poor lubrication and most significantly age/wear stack against any bearing, it will eventually fail.

These aren't pressure fed plain bearings with no surface contact, they're a ball bearing.
 
  
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