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Grey996
Spa-Francorchamps


Joined: 24 Jan 2017
Posts: 346
Location: Sheffield


PostPosted: Mon Nov 11, 2019 3:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, yes Millers provided a similar sheet listing the types of metals found, I was interested in whether the amounts found where indicators of anything?
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Robertb
Dijon


Joined: 01 Sep 2003
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Location: South Oxfordshire

2002 Porsche 996 Carrera 4S

PostPosted: Mon Nov 11, 2019 4:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The analysis is of more benefit when you have baseline values and can see a trend over time.
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"911- the guilt-free supercar"

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GMG
Nürburgring


Joined: 07 Jan 2018
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 11, 2019 5:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

...oil analysis is a waste of money unless you do it every few miles as analysis can show nothing of note one reading to my crankshaft is fooked the next as the bearing shells wear through to the copper !
 
  
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Robertb
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2002 Porsche 996 Carrera 4S

PostPosted: Mon Nov 11, 2019 6:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I recall it saved poppopbangbang some trouble when analysis picked up an issue (though not a bearing) before it got worse.
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Grey996
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Joined: 24 Jan 2017
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 11, 2019 7:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Robertb wrote:
The analysis is of more benefit when you have baseline values and can see a trend over time.


Thanks that makes sense but does anyone have any ballpark values of a ‘healthy’ engine?
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Alex
Le Mans
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Joined: 06 Mar 2014
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 11, 2019 7:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah - 0% Grin
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Robertb
Dijon


Joined: 01 Sep 2003
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Location: South Oxfordshire

2002 Porsche 996 Carrera 4S

PostPosted: Mon Nov 11, 2019 7:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Grey996 wrote:
Robertb wrote:
The analysis is of more benefit when you have baseline values and can see a trend over time.


Thanks that makes sense but does anyone have any ballpark values of a ‘healthy’ engine?


If the Millers guy says it’s ok then I’d run with that.

Get on and enjoy your car and stop worrying!
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skinny_monkey
Nürburgring


Joined: 16 Sep 2014
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 11, 2019 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very roughly, you are looking for around 10ppm or less of wear metals. Your readings look fine. Google blackstone oil analysis, a lot of Americans post up their readings with oil mileage so you can set what's typical for the 996.

Iron is crank / cams and i believe IMSB is iron alloy too
Ali is pistons
Lead and copper is bearings

Oil analysis detects conventional wear. It's useful to keep an eye on how things are generally looking and particular trends. It can't detect or predict sudden or catastrophic failures, but these are not often caused by excessive wear (for example can be inherent material faults or weaknesses)
 
  
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Grey996
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Joined: 24 Jan 2017
Posts: 346
Location: Sheffield


PostPosted: Tue Nov 12, 2019 12:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

skinny_monkey wrote:
Very roughly, you are looking for around 10ppm or less of wear metals. Your readings look fine. Google blackstone oil analysis, a lot of Americans post up their readings with oil mileage so you can set what's typical for the 996.

Iron is crank / cams and i believe IMSB is iron alloy too
Ali is pistons
Lead and copper is bearings

Oil analysis detects conventional wear. It's useful to keep an eye on how things are generally looking and particular trends. It can't detect or predict sudden or catastrophic failures, but these are not often caused by excessive wear (for example can be inherent material faults or weaknesses)


Thanks
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