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Milo72
Monza


Joined: 19 Sep 2018
Posts: 179
Location: Buckinghamshire


PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2018 6:54 pm    Post subject: Changing dampers and springs... a DIY job ? Reply with quote

Would like some advice on changing springs and dampers on my car, and if you think it’s a DIY job. I know it’s all relative to ability and DIY is different for all. So to give an idea of my capabilities.... happy with oil changes, pads and discs (just rebuilt a calliper) but the leaking oil cooler I think is beyond my ability.

So shocs and springs, DIY or Indy? Is does have PASM if that makes any difference.

Many Thanks and HNY
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jl-c
Silverstone


Joined: 22 Jul 2013
Posts: 105
Location: Shropshire


PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2018 7:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It can be DIY as long as you have the right tools and as long as it is not your daily and you have alternative transport. Also helps if it is in a lockable garage that is safe and warm if you have to leave it mid job. At least then if it all goes west you can get help as needed! Thumb
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deMort
Long Beach


Joined: 21 Mar 2015
Posts: 6178
Location: Brighton


PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2018 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Diy ..

If you take something appart you take pictures as you go .. you lay the parts out in order on a bench or the floor so that you can see the order they came off and so refit .

hence an oil cooler is not hard .. its just laying out the parts so you know what goes where when you refit them .

Pictures young man .. hell even i do this at times .

Ok suspension can be down to what tools you have .. if parts seize and trust me they do its a bit more complicated to get things appart .. failing that its replaceing them .

Top mounts can seize .. if you cant seperate it then you will need a new shock or a garage that can seperate them.

Pasm then you need to make sure the shock doesnt spin when removing the top mount .. you have to lock the collar either in a vice or the special holding tool .

Collar is the disc with x2 cut outs in it.

I think if only as a learning experience then have a go .. make sure you can afford the parts if it all goes wrong though .. by wrong i mean its seized and they aint ever coming appart .

If it all goes pear shaped .. you take the shock / hub to a local garage and get them to work on it .. but you wont know untill you try .. and the satisfaction of being able to do it yourself far out weights the cost saved .

Garages spend thousands of pounds training their guys .. you learn yourself and that an accomplishment .

Why do you think i come here Very Happy

Answers like this and encouragement !
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Milo72
Monza


Joined: 19 Sep 2018
Posts: 179
Location: Buckinghamshire


PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2018 8:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the advice and the direction... haven’t convinced myself on the oil cooler yet, anything that has fluids in always seems to leak after I’ve had a gonat it Smile

As for the shocs, I think I will..... as you say more satisfying doing it yourself rather than paying someone else.

I note your comments on bits that are siezed, but it looks like it could all do with replacing under there... the spring looks ok but everything else looks rusty or perished. Other than some spring compressors and a socket set do I need one of these? (picture below)
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deMort
Long Beach


Joined: 21 Mar 2015
Posts: 6178
Location: Brighton


PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2018 8:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thats not a tool ive seen before but it does look like it will do the job .

All you are trying to do is make sure the shaft doent spin on the cable .. a small amount of movement is ok but with an airgun it will go to far .
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kurlykris
Indianapolis


Joined: 30 Jun 2014
Posts: 2329
Location: Warwickshire


PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2018 8:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is the special tool that demort refers to for holding the shock/damper piston when you remove it from the top mount. You cannot rotate the piston in the shock/damper at all or the shock is destroyed, you can hold it in a vice or use that tool when you undo and tighten the top nut Thumb
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Milo72
Monza


Joined: 19 Sep 2018
Posts: 179
Location: Buckinghamshire


PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2018 8:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks all...
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