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Steve997
Monza


Joined: 11 Aug 2013
Posts: 215



PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2018 12:32 pm    Post subject: 997.1 PASM Reply with quote

Read the below on rennlist and not sure if I believe it. I rarely turn psm off tbh as being a novice in a 911 find it helpful.

From my own personal experience, try turning the PSM off when putting the PASM into hard mode: It makes it a significantly better ride, more like the gen2. Well, it did on my mate's 997.1 T4S, anyway. Very odd feeling, and none of the tech guides mention anything about the PSM effecting the PASM in that way. It definitely, definitely does though.
 
  
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resigner
Suzuka


Joined: 19 Dec 2013
Posts: 1141



PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2018 3:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

well i might try it in the summer, but today, noooooooo Smile
 
  
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Steve997
Monza


Joined: 11 Aug 2013
Posts: 215



PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2018 4:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Haha exactly how i feel
 
  
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Phil 997
Brands Hatch
Brands Hatch


Joined: 05 Dec 2015
Posts: 14288
Location: Bournemouth,Dorset

2009 Porsche 997 Carrera 4S

PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2018 4:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think most of us have no idea of half the hacks and cheats available on these cars, unless they get found and discussed like this.
Always good to hear about a new one to me Thumb Thumb

I am still fighting with sorting the keyfob window up down feature Floor
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Steve997
Monza


Joined: 11 Aug 2013
Posts: 215



PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2018 7:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Found this and thought useful to share

Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM)

For the first time in the 911 series, the new 911 Carrera S is offered with a
chassis that has actively adjustable dampers. The PASM is standard equipment
for the 911 Carrera S. In comparison with the standard chassis, the vehicle with
the PASM chassis lies 10 mm lower.
The newly developed, variable damping system “Porsche Active Suspension
Management” helps to do justice to the demands for a modern chassis.
The aim was to maintain the high comfort level of the standard chassis while
increasing performance at the same time.
This technical data is merely intended to provide an overview. As it is subject
to change during the course of the model year, the data published in the
Technical Manual always remains authoritative.

The driver can choose between two programmes: “Normal” and “Sport”, both
are selected via a button on the centre console.
The function light in the button comes on with the Sport setting. At the same
time a damper icon appears in the instrument cluster display together with the
text “PASM Sport”. When the normal programme is activated, the damper icon
appears accompanied by the text “PASM Normal”. The text and icon remain
visible for 4 seconds and then disappear.
PASM combines two chassis rolled into one: One with equal measures of
sportiness and comfort and one entirely dedicated to sportiness and the race
circuit.
Normal mode (the basic setting when the vehicle starts) on the one hand
provides the same excellent comfort as the standard chassis, on the other
hand, the chassis approximates the sportiness of the sports chassis when
regulative interventions are made with active PASM. In conjunction with specially
developed software modules, the PASM ensures excellent performance and
even greater driving safety in extreme situations.

Operating principles of PASM

PASM selects the required damper hardness for each individual wheel from a
precisely co-ordinated map in both the Normal and the Sport programme.
The possible damper settings range from comfortable to decidedly sporty.
Both programmes, which overlap slightly in some areas, are additionally
superimposed with five special software modules to provide the optimum
damper settings for every driving condition.
The system automatically selects the appropriate damper hardness based on
the PASM programme selected and the driving condition identified.
The Normal programme offers comfortable settings with low damper forces.
Special control algorithms in the PASM software modules enable the chassis to
offer greater active driving safety in extreme driving situations, even with the
Normal programme. To increase driving safety at higher speeds, the dampers
are automatically switched to a harder damper setting as speed increases.
The dampers switch to a hard characteristic when Sport mode is activated.
This offers superior agility and excellent steering precision on uneven surfaces.
If the system detects an uneven driving surface in Sport mode, it immediately
switches to a softer characteristic to improve contact with the road surface.
PASM selects the optimum damper setting for this softer characteristic from
the Sport map.
Since extremely hard damping is not always the ideal solution in every driving
situation (depending on the driving surface, the vehicle may start to bounce or
shift), the intentional overlap between the Normal and Sport maps allows a
noticeably soft setting to be selected if necessary. The customer gets an
“active sports chassis” which automatically responds to the actual road surface
and switches from a hard, sporty damping setting to a comfortable range as
necessary. PASM switches back to the original characteristic as soon as the
road surface is smooth enough.

The following is a detailed description of the five software modules overlapping
Normal and Sport mode.

Lane-change module

The damper forces at both axles are immediately increased in response to
rapid steering movements, for example sudden evasive manoeuvres.
This reduces body tilt and instability, thereby significantly improving vehicle
control even in extreme situations.

Vertical-control module

In the Normal programme, the damper force is increased as soon as the
vertical movement of the body, for example when driving over uneven surfaces,
rises over a specific threshold value. This prevents body instability and therefore
woolly driving behaviour.
In the Sport programme, the damping is slightly reduced automatically to
improve contact between the road and the wheels as body movements
increase. This also results in a noticeable increase in comfort.

Lateral-acceleration module

If specific, speed-dependent thresholds for lateral acceleration are exceeded
when cornering in the Normal programme, the damper force is increased by
different, defined amounts for each side of the vehicle. This prevents vehicle
instability and significantly increases driving precision.
In the event of large vertical movements and high lateral acceleration
coinciding, the higher of the vertical-control and lateral-acceleration damping
values is set. This happens if, for example, the damping in the Sport
programme was previously decreased by the vertical-control module.

Brake module

PASM switches to harder damping at the start of a braking operation to reduce
vehicle nose-dive when braking. This way, higher brake forces can be
transmitted to the road faster. It switches back to a softer setting (this setting is
different for the front and rear axle) after a specific amount of time. The result
is improved road contact, and thus a shorter braking distance, particularly when
braking on uneven surfaces.

Load-change module

The damper characteristics for the front and rear axle are individually switched
when accelerating heavily, releasing the throttle or changing lanes. In Normal
mode, the dampers are briefly switched to a harder damping setting in these
driving conditions. This avoids excessive lifting or diving at the front of the
vehicle (“pitching”). In Sport mode, a softer damper characteristic is briefly
selected if necessary to improve traction when accelerating, particularly on
uneven surfaces.

Components

The PASM system comprises the following components:
• Four dampers with continuously adjustable damping force (each with one
bypass valve)
• PASM control module
• Two acceleration sensors for detecting vertical movement of the body
(one at the damper dome at the front right and one at the rear left).
Further signals such as lateral acceleration, steering angle, travel speed,
brake pressure, engine torque, etc. are read in via the CAN bus.
• One button for selecting the programme (Normal or Sport)
The system measures body movements via one acceleration sensor on each
axle (front and rear). Values such as lateral acceleration, steering wheel angle,
vehicle speed and information on possible braking operations are provided by
the PSM via the CAN bus. Engine rpm and torque values are provided by the
Motronic via the CAN bus.

Acceleration sensor

The acceleration sensors are attached to the front right and rear left spring
strut domes, respectively.
The arrangement allows lifting, pitching and rolling movements of the body to
be measured.

PASM control module

In left-hand drive vehicles, the PASM control module is installed on the front wall
(footwell passenger’s side) at the right. In right-hand drive vehicles it is installed
on the front wall (footwell passenger’s side) at the left.

Shock absorbers

Unlike conventional dampers, the PASM map-controlled damper also has an
electrically actuated hydraulic bypass valve (arrow).
The damping effect is provided by the oil in the damper flowing through a piston
valve when the vehicle moves. The smaller the valve cross section, the harder
the damping.
With the PASM damper, the oil can flow through a bypass valve, as well as
through a fixed valve in the main piston. The flow can be increased or reduced
by opening and closing the valve via a slide, producing continuous adjustment
of the damper force.
In the event of a system failure, the valve automatically closes. PASM is then in
the hardest damper setting and thus the safest mode from a driving dynamics
point of view (fail-safe principle).
 
  
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Phil 997
Brands Hatch
Brands Hatch


Joined: 05 Dec 2015
Posts: 14288
Location: Bournemouth,Dorset

2009 Porsche 997 Carrera 4S

PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2018 7:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Makes you wonder how anyone ever crashes these cars Grin Grin Thumb
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Others Enjoy The Moment Today.
 
  
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Steve997
Monza


Joined: 11 Aug 2013
Posts: 215



PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 3:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah the elecfroxnis certainly tidy things up and make life easier.

I disconnected the battery today and for some reason which I have no idea way it threw up a fault saying PSM failure Very Happy

No psm and the car goes sideways very easily.
 
  
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Phil 997
Brands Hatch
Brands Hatch


Joined: 05 Dec 2015
Posts: 14288
Location: Bournemouth,Dorset

2009 Porsche 997 Carrera 4S

PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 4:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Steve997 wrote:
Yeah the elecfroxnis certainly tidy things up and make life easier.

I disconnected the battery today and for some reason which I have no idea way it threw up a fault saying PSM failure Very Happy

No psm and the car goes sideways very easily.


it should go off when you hive a few hundred yards mate Thumb
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Others Enjoy The Moment Today.
 
  
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KJD
Suzuka


Joined: 18 Feb 2015
Posts: 1202
Location: Monmouthshire


PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 5:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll have to try this little find . Thumb
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deMort
Zolder


Joined: 21 Mar 2015
Posts: 5154
Location: Brighton


PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 7:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you disconnect the battery the car forgets the steering angle sensor position .. you drive it over 6mph and it remembers it .

PSM needs to know this hence the warning .

It DOESNT learn it though .. if you do steering work on a car then you have to teach the steering angle position after said work with a tester ,thats on hydraulic systems .. electric is different .


PASM .. i wouldnt recomend a car without it IMHO .. a marvelous invention .
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Steve997
Monza


Joined: 11 Aug 2013
Posts: 215



PostPosted: Sat Feb 03, 2018 8:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cheers for the advice on PSM failure. When I first saw the fault I thought the worst. Glad to hear it's nothing more than a reset.
 
  
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